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[Emma Hamilton?] The Celestial Bed with the Rosy Goddess of Health reposing thereon.
[Emma Hamilton?] The Celestial Bed with the Rosy Goddess of Health reposing thereon.
[n.d., 1782.]
Scarce engraving. Sheet 155 x 100mm (6 x 4"). Trimmed within plate and mounted in album paper.
An illustration of a bed with supposedly supernatural powers. The bare-breasted woman draped across it is said to be Emma Hart, later Emma Hamilton, mistress of Lord Nelson. In 1780 Dr James Graham (1745-94) opened the 'Temple of Health and Hymen' in the Adelphi and later Schomberg House, Pall Mall. There he lectured on magnetism as a benefit 'healthy living', offering his 'Celestial Bed' to couples wishing to conceive for £50 a night. It measured nine by twelve feet and was supported by glass rods that would glow green when charged with static electricity. Described by the British Medical Journal described as 'one of the vilest imposters in the history of quackery', Graham got into financial difficulties and was imprisoned for debt. Emma Hart was one of his acolytes before becoming the mistress of Sir Harry Featherstonehaugh of Uppark in 1781 and becoming the muse of George Romney.
[Ref: 61766]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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[At Jamrach's, The Dealer in Wild Animals, East London.]
[At Jamrach's, The Dealer in Wild Animals, East London.]
W.H.W.
[n.d., 1887.]
Pen and ink, sheet 230 x 315mm (9 x 12½"), with a wood-engraved version of the scene. Tear entering image at top, mounted on album paper.
A view of the animal cages at Mr Jamrach's repository on St George's Street (the Ratcliffe Highway), with a keeper and a customer. In the cages are kangaroos, emus and an owl. The wood-engraving comes from the Illustrated London News of February 19th, 1887, with additional details, including a boy, camels, an elephant (on top of a cage, so probably stuffed) and some skulls. Charles Jamrach (Johann Christian Carl Jamrach, 1815-91) took over the London branch of his father's animal business c.1840. In 1857 a Bengal tiger escaped from its box at the Emporium, snatching a small boy in the street; Jamrach used his bare hands and a crowbar borrowed from a bystander to rescue the boy (who sued Jamrach for £300).
[Ref: 61991]   £280.00   (£336.00 incl.VAT)
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