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The Village Ale-House.
The Village Ale-House. No more the Farmer's News, the Barbers Tale / No more, the Woodman's ballad shall prevail / No more the Smith his duskey brow shall clear / Relax his pond'rous strength, and lean to hear; / The Host himself, no longer shall be found / Carefull to see the mantling bliss go round: / Nor the coy Maid, half willing to be press'd, / Shall kiss the Cup, and pass it to the rest. Goldsmith
H. Bunbury Esq.r Delin.t. J. Grozier Sculp.
London, Published April 7.th 1787 by W. Dickinson Engraver & Printseller No. 158. New Bond Street
Rare stipple, printed in sepia. 425 x 530mm (16¾ x 20¾"), 18th century watermark. Trimmed into plate at bottom.
An idealised tavern interior, with a pretty maid drinking from a large tankard. The verse is from Oliver Goldsmith's poem, 'The Deserted Village', decrying the population shift to the cities brought about by the Industrial Revolution.
[Ref: 55685]   £360.00  
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The Ghost of Omichund.
The Ghost of Omichund. What Woes, he cried, hath lust of Gold, O'er my poor Country widely roll'd, Plunderers proceed!
[London: printed for T. Wright, 1773.]
Engraving. 165 x 110mm (6½ x 4¼"), very large margins. Stains and holes in margins.
Robert Clive falls back to be supported by two officers, horrified by the appearance of the ghost of Omichund, a Bengali merchant. Behind a man hangs from a palm tree by his wrists. The plate illustrated a text in the 'Westminster Magazine, a satirical dialogue between 'Nabob' (Clive) and Omichund. After Clive recaptured Calcutta after the 'Black Hole' incident in 1757, Omichund was send as an intermediary to help negotiate a treaty with Mir Jafar. When he demanded a cut of 5% of the treasure recovered, threatening to expose the deal, Clive had a fake copy of the treaty made op for Omichund to sign, a trick that worked. It was reported that Omichund went mad and died shortly, leading to this attack on Clive's treachery, but he lived another decade in this will he bequeathed £2000 to the Foundling Hospital (the list of benefactors describes him as ''a black merchant of Calcutta'') and also to the Magdalen Hospital in London.
BM Satires 5101.
[Ref: 55606]   £70.00   (£84.00 incl.VAT)
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National Types. Ethiopia.
National Types. Ethiopia.
G. Bridgman delin. Printed by C.F. Kell, Castle St, Holborn E.C. Deposé.
Reynolds & Co. 32 St James St. London [n.d., c.1880.].
Tinted lithograph. Printed area 335 x 205mm (13¼ x 8") large margins.
An appallingly-racist caricature of an Ethiopian in smart European dress, but bandy-legged and feet pointing sideways. The Amon Carter Museum of American Art identifies the artist as the Canadian George Bridgman (1864-1943) who taught anatomy for artists at the Art Students League of New York for some 45 years.
See Amon Carter Museum of American Art 1974.45 for 'America' from this series.
[Ref: 55659]   £190.00   (£228.00 incl.VAT)
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John Gilpin.
John Gilpin. Proof.
Painted by Tho.s Stotard Esq.r R.A. Engraved by W.H. Worthington.
Published by William Pickering and William Henry Worthington, January 1st, 1825.
Engraving. Sheet 270 x 585mm (10¾ x 23"). Trimmed into plate, some surface wear.
A man rides a galloping horse, unable to stop, his wig flying off. A scene from William Cowper's comic ballad, which was inspired by a draper of Cheapside. Attempting to ride to the Bell Inn, Edmonton, Gilpin lost control of his horse and over-shot his destination by ten miles, arriving in Ware. Written in 1782 the poem was extremely popular, with pirate editions of the book and even John Gilpin toys, an early example of merchandising. Editions have been illustrated by artists as diverse as Randolph Caldecott and Ronald Searle.
[Ref: 55696]   £380.00   (£456.00 incl.VAT)
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Political Dinner, Tom & Bob taking a lesson on the Constitution & not neglecting their own.
Political Dinner, Tom & Bob taking a lesson on the Constitution & not neglecting their own.
London, Published by Jones & Co, Sep.r 8th 1821.
Coloured aquatint. 120 x 180mm (4¾ x 7"). Holes in margins, some staining to edges.
A dinner, with wine being spilt and poured on the floor. From Peirce Egan's 'Real Life in London'.
[Ref: 55720]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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A Masquerade.
A Masquerade. 148.
Published 4.th April, 1795, by Laurie & Whittle, 53, Fleet Street, London.
Fine coloured etching. 200 x 250mm (8 x 9¾"). Slight creasing near flag.
A fancy dress party, including guests dressed as Selene, Falstaff, a cleric, a devil, a Jew, a Turk and a black man in a jester costume.
Not in BM.
[Ref: 55645]   £360.00  
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Splendid Jem, once a dashing hero in the Metropolis, recognized by Tom amongst the Convicts, in the Dock Yard at Chatham.
Splendid Jem, once a dashing hero in the Metropolis, recognized by Tom amongst the Convicts, in the Dock Yard at Chatham.
Drawn & Eng.d by Rob.t Cruikshank.
[n.d. c.1821.]
Hand-coloured aquatint. 145 x 220mm (5¾ x 8¾").
Jem, one of a gang of convicts kept on hulks on the River Medway prior to gaol transportation, lifts his cap to Tom. Australian interest. From Pierce Egan's "Life in London".
[Ref: 55724]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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