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Defeat of the British Army, 12,000 strong under the Command of Sir Edward Packenham, in the attack of the American lines defended by 3,600 Militia commanded by Major General Andrew Jackson January 8the 1815, on Chalmette plain, five miles below New Orle
Defeat of the British Army, 12,000 strong under the Command of Sir Edward Packenham, in the attack of the American lines defended by 3,600 Militia commanded by Major General Andrew Jackson January 8the 1815, on Chalmette plain, five miles below New Orle ans on the left bank of the Mississippi. Drawn on the Field of Battle and painted by H.the Laclotte arch.t and assist Engineer in the Louisiana Army the Year 1815.
Dessine par H.the Laclotte. Grave par PL Debucourt.
[c.1817.]
Extremely scarce etching with aquatint, printed in sepia. Sheet 545 x 695mm (21½ x 27¼"). Several closed tears from extremities, some into image. The lower right corner has been re-attached.
Magnificent prospect of the battle at Chalmette Plantation, Louisiana, on January 8th 1815, the largest engagement of the Battle of New Orleans, a prolonged battle between the United Kingdom and United States which took place from December 23rd, 1814, to January 26th, 1815. American forces, commanded by General Andrew Jackson, defeated an invading British Army intent on seizing New Orleans and the vast territory America had acquired with the Louisiana Purchase. The Treaty of Ghent had been signed on December 24th, 1814, but news of the peace would not reach the combatants until February. The battle is often regarded as the greatest American land victory of the Anglo-American War of 1812 to 1815, called the 'War of 1812'. At the end of that January day, the British had 2,042 casualties: 291 killed (including Generals Pakenham and Gibbs), 1,267 wounded (including General Keane) and 484 captured or missing. The Americans had 71 casualties: 13 dead; 39 wounded and 19 missing. Seal of the United States between English and French titles. Print made by Philibert Louis Debucourt (1755 - 1832), after the painting by Jean-Hyacinthe Laclotte, composed from his first-hand sketches of the battle. Laclotte was an architect, artist and engineer born in Bordeaux. He worked in New Orleans from 1806 until 1815, where he designed the Orleans Theater and planned the Faubourg Plaisance subdivision of the city. In 1810, he had formed a partnership with Arsene Latour and opened a school of drawing, architecture, carpentry and decorating. This print comes onto the market extremely rarely (usually hand coloured). Eight impressions are known in institutional collection: at the Library of Congress, New York Public Library, Amon Carter Museum, the New Orleans Historical Society, and four at the New York Historical Society.
[Ref: 55078]   £6,500.00  
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[Battle of the Boyne.] To His Royal Highness George Prince of Wales, This Plate engraved from the original Picture of The Battle of the Boyne,
[Battle of the Boyne.] To His Royal Highness George Prince of Wales, This Plate engraved from the original Picture of The Battle of the Boyne, in the Collection of the R.t Hon.ble the Lord Grosvenor Is by permission Dedicated by His Roal Highnesse's most faithful obedient Servants - Benj.n West and John Hill.
Painted by B. West, Historical Painter to His Majesty. Engraved by John Hall.
Published as the Act directs, 18 Oct.r 1781 by B. West, j. Hall & W. Woollett, London.
Etching with engraving, 18th century watermark. 485 x 615mm (19 x 24¼"). Trimmed to plate, some toning of paper.
William III on a white horse, leading his army across the Boyne, 1st July 1690. Bottom right the Duke of Schomberg is carried off by four soldiers, having been shot in the neck
BM: 1876,0708.2600, final published state.
[Ref: 54702]   £420.00  
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Triumphal Entry of the Brave and Glorious Guards into London, July 9, 1856.
Triumphal Entry of the Brave and Glorious Guards into London, July 9, 1856. Sketched from Opposite the Treasury Buildings and Horse Guards. ''Alma'' - ''Inkermann'' - ''Sebastapol.''
London: Published July 11th, 1856, by Read & Co., 10, Johnson's Court, Fleet Street.
Fine coloured tinted lithograph. Sheet 455 x 530mm (18 x 20¾"), with blind stamp of 'Ackermann & Co' under publication line. Repaired tear at top, crease through inscription area.
Battalions of Grenadier, Fusilier and Coldstream Guards, veterans of the Crimean War, in Whitehall, having marched from Nine Elms Station on their way to Buckingham Palace and Hyde Park. Led by their brass band, they carry their battle-scarred ensigns. This print was published only two days after the event.
[Ref: 54705]   £360.00  
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The Thirty-first Regiment, Sir Harry Smith's Division, advancing to the Charge, At the Battle of Moodkee, on the 18th. of December 1845.
The Thirty-first Regiment, Sir Harry Smith's Division, advancing to the Charge, At the Battle of Moodkee, on the 18th. of December 1845. To Major General Sir Harry Smith, Bar.t G.C.B. &c. &c. this Plate is most respectfully Inscribed, by his very obliged and obedient Servant, Rudolph Ackermann, 191, Regent Street.
Painted by H. Martens, from a Sketch by Major G.F. White 31st Reg.t. Engraved by J. Harris.
London: Published June 14.th 1848, by Rudolph Ackermann, at his Eclipse Sporting & Military Gallery, 191 Regent Street.
Aquatint, printed in colours and hand finished. 525 x 670mm (20¾ x 36½"). Trimmed to plate, edges chipped, two slight creases.
A view of the Battle of Mudki which was fought between the East India Company and Sikh Khalsa Army during the First Anglo-Sikh War. On the right the British Army approaches the Sikhs standing behind a row of cannon. It was a costly battle for both sides: among the British dead was Major General Sir Robert Henry Sale, veteran of Seringapatam, the First Burmese War and the First Afghan War, in which he commanded the garrison of Jalalabad and famously rescued his wife from Afghan captivity.
[Ref: 54704]   £750.00  
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View of the Royal Artillery Barracks, Woolwich. Dedicated by permission, to the Rigth Hon.ble the Earl of Mulgrave, Master General of the Ordnance, by his most obedient humble Servant, [Jas. Cockburn, Major in the Royal Artillery. ]
View of the Royal Artillery Barracks, Woolwich. Dedicated by permission, to the Rigth Hon.ble the Earl of Mulgrave, Master General of the Ordnance, by his most obedient humble Servant, [Jas. Cockburn, Major in the Royal Artillery. ]
Drawn by Major Cockburn. Engraved by R. Havell & Son. 3 Chapel Street, Tottenham Court Road.
[Published March 30, 1816, for the Proprietor, by Colnaghi & Co, Cockspur Street, London.]
Coloured aquatint. Sheet 340 x 500mm (13½ x 19¾"). Trimmed, losing end of dedication and publication line.
The Royal Artillery excercising. From "Cockburn's Woolwich'.
Ogilby: 186.
[Ref: 54950]   £390.00  
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This Armoury was Honoured by the Presence of Their Majesties King William the 4th and Queen Adelaide on the 5th August 1830.
This Armoury was Honoured by the Presence of Their Majesties King William the 4th and Queen Adelaide on the 5th August 1830.
Drawn by C. Caplin. Engraved by Ja.s Bedaway.
Printed by Gaywood & Longworth.
Scarce engraving. 420 x 310mm (16½ x 12¾"). Repaired tear on right.
A representation of a trophy commissioned to celebrate the State Visit of William IV and Queen Adelaide to the Royal Armouries in the Tower of London, 5th August 1830. They were received by Arthur, Duke of Wellington, who was Constable of the Tower. Placed on the Grand Staircase, it features a bust of the king surrounded by a variety of weapons, including relics of Blenheim and Waterloo. The trophy was destroyed in the fire in the Tower of London of 1841
[Ref: 54747]   £380.00  
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