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The Clipper Ship ''Anglesey'', 1150 Tons.
The Clipper Ship ''Anglesey'', 1150 Tons. To Commander Edward Jones, and the Officers of the Ship, this print is most respectfully dedicated by their obedient servant, W.m Foster.
T.G. Dutton, del. et lith. Day & Son, Lith.rs to the Queen.
London, Published by W.m Foster, 114 Fenchurch St. [n.d., c.1870]
Tinted lithograph. 345 x 430mm (13½ x 17"). Large margins on 2 sides.
The ship was built in London in 1852, probably by R & H Green, for the London to Australia run
[Ref: 53088]   £620.00  
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A View of the Ship Columbus, from a Drawing on the Spot
A View of the Ship Columbus, from a Drawing on the Spot Immediately after her launch, with near 4000 Tons of her cargo on board, Built at Quebec, 1824, by Charles Wood of Port Glasgow. The Length of this Immense Vessel is 300 Feet, Breadth of beam 50 Feet; depth of Hold 30 Feet, She is flat bottom'd, Measures 3900 Tons Register.
M. van Ogg Lith.o.
Printed and Sold by S. Vowles, 3 St Michael's Abbey, Cornhill [n.d., c.1824].
Rare coloured lithograph. Sheet 235 x 245mm (9¼ x 9¾"). Trimmed and mounted in album paper.
A depiction of the Columbus, a four-masted barque which was the largest ship ever built at the time. Built by Charles Wood, it was basically a raft, designed to carry large tree trunks for use as masts across the Atlantic, and to be dismantled after one voyage and its timbers sold for reuse. Her first crossing took three months, but instead of being dismantled her owners sent her back, but she was wrecked in the English Channel on 17 May 1825. An even larger version, 'The Baron of Renfrew' was wrecked the following year, making such vessels uninsurable.
See 53089 for similar item.
[Ref: 52925]   £360.00  
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The Columbus, (or Great American Raft).
The Columbus, (or Great American Raft). Commanded by Cap.t M.cKellar. R.N. Dimensions_ length 301 Feet. breadth 50 Feet 6 Inches; depth of hold 30 Feet. 3690 Register Tons. built at Quebec 1824 by Charles Wood.
Engraved by Permission from an Accurate drawing made on the Spot.
Published for the Proprietors Nov.r 1824 by Lamb, Gracechurch St. London.
Coloured lithograph. Sheet 270 x 385mm (10½ x 15¼") Slight damage in corners. Blotchy colour in sky.
A depiction of the Columbus, a four-masted barque which was the largest ship ever built at the time of launch. It was basically a raft, designed to carry large tree trunks for use as masts across the Atlantic, and to be dismantled after one voyage and its timbers sold for reuse. Her first crossing took three months, but instead of being dismantled her owners sent her back, but she was wrecked in the English Channel on 17 May 1825. An even larger version, 'The Baron of Renfrew' was wrecked the following year, making such vessels uninsurable.
See 52925 for similar item.
[Ref: 53089]   £280.00   (£336.00 incl.VAT)
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H.M. Brigantine, Dolphin, 3 Guns.
H.M. Brigantine, Dolphin, 3 Guns.
H. John Vernon, del. et lith. Day & Haghe Lithrs to the Queen.
London, Published by W. Foster, 114, Fenchurch St. [n.d., c.1852.]
Rare tinted lithograph with hand colour. Image 195 x 275mm (7¾ x 10¾"). Gallery label stuck on reverse.
'Dolphin' , 319 tons, launched at Sheerness Dockyard in 1836, was assigned to anti-slavery patrols, on the West African coast from September 1837 to October 1842, on the south-east coast of America May 1843 to March 1847, then back to Africa September 1847 until at least 1854. From 1861 to 1871 it was in Customs service at home and it was broken-up in 1894. Although there is no accompanying information, it has been suggested the scene shows 'Dolphin' taking the American slaver 'Mary Adeline' off the Congo in 1852, with the brig opening fire on a schooner whose mizzen driver is collapsing. However this does not tally with the only report in English newspapers for 1852, which told how 'Dolphin' saved 'Mary Adeline' from looting by the locals when it ran aground in the mouth of the Congo on 19 June. Certainly in this view 'Dolphin' is firing on the schooner.
See NMM: PAF8073 for a full account.
[Ref: 53074]   £420.00  
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The Great Western Steamer, In the Hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean, Sept 9th 1846 in the outward passage to America.
The Great Western Steamer, In the Hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean, Sept 9th 1846 in the outward passage to America.
Henry Melling Invenit et Lithog.
Liverpool: Dec 10th 1846 Published by the Artist. Slater St.
Lithograph. Printed area 265 x 445mm (10½ x 17½") large margins. Repaired tear on left, laid on restorer's paper.
Isambard Kingdom Brunel's SS Great Western, launched in 1837, was the first steamship purpose-built for the Atlantic crossing. Her maiden voyage, completed on 23 April 1838, was the fastest crossing up to that time. On this 1846 Liverpool to New York run she ran into bad weather. On the 19th (not the 9th) September the sails had to be pulled in but were lost anyway. Water got into the engine room and had to be pumped out. Waves broke the ice house (containing about eight tons of ice) from its deck fastenings, along with two lifeboats. The port paddle box (covering the upper half of the paddle wheel) was smashed and a splinter struck the captain in the head. A wave crashed over the ship and drenched the passengers sheltering in the saloon. Captain Mathews said to a passenger afterwards that ''Thrice on deck I thought destruction inevitable'' but because the engines never failed the Great Western survived the storm.
[Ref: 53085]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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H.M.A.S. Australia [pencil.]
H.M.A.S. Australia [pencil.]
Rowland Langmaid [pencil.]
[n.d. c.1945.]
Rare etching. 150 x 285mm (6 x 11¼"), with large margins.
HMAS Australia (I84/D84/C01), a heavy cruiser of the Royal Australian Navy, shown at anchor surrounded by yachts. After being damaged by kamikaze attacks in the Pacific she was sent for repairs at Portsmouth, where this scene was probably captured. A pupil of W.L Wyllie; Rowland Langmaid (1897-1956) served in the Royal Navy and attained the rank of Lt. Commander. He exhibited at the R.A.
[Ref: 52984]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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The taking the Nuestra Senora de los Remedias,
The taking the Nuestra Senora de los Remedias, (alias La Ninfa) a Spanish Ship of 900 Tons, 32 Guns, & 300 Men, very Richly Laden, by the Royal Family Privateers, 5 February, 1746, off Cape St Marys.
Brooking Pinx.t. Boydell sculp.
Publish'd according to Act of Parliament 1753, & Sold by J. Boydell Engraver at the Unicorn the corner of Queen Street, Cheapside.
Engraving. 340 x 470mm (13½ x 18½"). Framed. Paper toned. Unexamined out of frame.
A Spanish ship about to be attacked by three British privateers, 'Prince Frederick'. 'Duke' and 'Prince George'. The ship was being taken back to England when it was wrecked in a storm off Beachy Head. In 1753 Boydell published a series of prints about the 'Royal Family', a fleet of privateers with ships named after the family of George II.
[Ref: 53220]   £580.00  
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Clipper Ship ''Shannon'', 1450 Tons.
Clipper Ship ''Shannon'', 1450 Tons. C.L F. Daniell Esq. Commander. Built by Mess.rs Green of Blackwall
T.G. Dutton del.t et lith. Day & Son, Lith.rs to the Queen.
London, Published by W.m Foster, 114 Fenchurch Streeet.
Tinted lithograph. Sheet 390 x 520mm (15½ x 20½"). Repaired damage to margins and inscription area, staining.
Launched in 1868 for the Blackwall Line's London to Australia run, she is shown here in full sail, flying the line's house flag.
NMM PAH9337. Australia NMM 15238
[Ref: 53075]   £550.00  
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