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The View and Humours of Billingsgate.
The View and Humours of Billingsgate.
The Wonders of ye Deep, often attempted, and never perform'd but by Arnold Vanhaecken, 1762.
[1762.]
Engraving with 18th century watermark. Plate: 575 x 445mm (22½ x 17½"). Very small margins. Central staining on right centre margin.
A satire on the fish market at Billingsgate, showing a large variety of fishmongers selling their wares. In the centre a man with a basket is knocked down by a dog sprinting across the scene. A later re-print of the 1736 and is the first plate to a series of fish prints engraved by Giles King.
BM Satire 2284.
[Ref: 44414]   £550.00  
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View of the Observatory erected over the Cross of St Pauls Cathedral,
View of the Observatory erected over the Cross of St Pauls Cathedral, from which a Panoramic View of London and its Environs was executed by Tho.s Hornor in the Summer of 1821, with a Sketch of St Pauls showing its elevation with respect to the neighbouring buildings.
[Engraved by Samuel Rawle?]
[n.d., c.1823.]
Scarce etching. 285 x 230mm (11¼ x 9") very large margins. Slight spotting and soiling.
A view of a hut on a wooden scaffold on top of the dome of dome of St Paul's Cathedral, with a prospect of the City and a detail of the scaffold. In 1821 the cross above St Paul's Cathedral was removed to be reguilded: Thomas Hornor (1785-1844) got permission to erect an observatory in its place in order to paint a true panorama of London. His original intention was to sell prints, but could not attract enough subscribers. Instead he launched a plan to display the panorama in a purpose-built dome in Regents Park, the 'Colosseum', publishing this plate in the prospectus in 1823. The panorama opened to the public in 1829, but the cost led Hornor and his principal backer to flee to America to avoid creditors.
[Ref: 59217]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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