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Habitation et Propriété de M.r Henri Fournier Sur la Montagne de S.ta Thereza à Rio Janeiro.
Habitation et Propriété de M.r Henri Fournier Sur la Montagne de S.ta Thereza à Rio Janeiro.
Dessiné par Mr N. Desmons.Lith. par A. Guesdon.
Imp. Lemercier, Pris. [n.d., 1855.]
Rare tinted lithograph. Sheet. 395 x 850mm (15½ x 33½"). Extensive tear, repaired, cracking, surface abrasion, laid on archival paper. Damaged.
A Brazilian fazenda (plantation) building, with some of the black workers dancing outside. Iluchar Desmons (b.1803) settled in Rio de Janeiro in 1840. In 1855 he published ''Panoramas de la Ville de Rio de Janeiro'', with thirteen lithographs. He often signed his plates with 'N Desmons'.
[Ref: 54161]   £450.00  
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A View of the Bay of Gaspe in the Government of Quebec Situate in the Gulf of St. Laurence.
A View of the Bay of Gaspe in the Government of Quebec Situate in the Gulf of St. Laurence. A House on the Beach in which Gen.l Wolf resided in 1759. / 2. 1500 Quintals of Fish.
Gent. Mag.
London, [n.d. 1764]
Engraving, 18th century watermark. 175 x 250mm (7 x 9¾"), with wide margins. Two vertical creases as issued.
A view of Gaspe Bay, on the northeast coast of the Gaspe peninsula, Quebec. The General Wolf mentioned is British army officer James Wolfe (1727-1759), remembered for his victory over the French at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in Quebec. The battle lasted only fifteen minutes but Wolfe was fatally shot three times; he was posthumously dubbed 'The Hero of Quebec'.
[Ref: 54089]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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Entrance into Halifax Harbour.
Entrance into Halifax Harbour.
D. Serres del. Wells Sculp.
by J. Gold, 703, Shoe Lane.
Aquatint. 140 x 230mm (5½ x 9¼"). Trimmed.
View of the harbour of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Published in the 'Naval Chronicle'.
[Ref: 53864]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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William Penn's Treaty with the Indians, when he founded the Province of Pensylvania in North America 1681.
William Penn's Treaty with the Indians, when he founded the Province of Pensylvania in North America 1681. To the Proprietaries of the Province of Pensylvania, &c. &c. This Print, Engraved from the Original Painting belonging to the late Thomas Penn Esquire, Is respectfully Inscribed by Their obedient humble Servant John Boydell.
Benj: West pinxit. John Hall sculpsit.
Published, June 12th. 1775 by John Boydell Engraver in Cheapside London.
Engraving. 485 x 615mm (19 x 24¼"). Repairs to edges.
William Penn's (1644 - 1718) 'Great Treaty' was reputedly signed with Delaware Indian leaders in 1682 under an ancient elm tree at the village of Shackamaxon, located in what are now the borders of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This highly detailed depiction of the event, shows Penn in the centre left, with his arms open, his entourage beside him, two of his men kneeling, offering gifts to the Indians who are assembled at the right. Buildings in construction can be seen behind at the left, with boats on the sea at right. The painting by Benjamin West (1738 - 1820), who was born in Pennsylvania, is now in the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. West was the first American-born artist to receive international recognition and remains one of the most important eighteenth-century painters of historical scenes. He enjoyed a career that endured more than half a century that included serving as president of the Royal Academy. William Penn, quaker leader and founder of Pennsylvania, was the first great hero of American liberty. During the late seventeenth century, Penn established an American sanctuary which protected freedom of conscience. Almost everywhere else, colonists stole land from the Indians, but Penn travelled unarmed among the Indians and negotiated peaceful purchases. He insisted that women deserved equal rights with men. He gave Pennsylvania a written constitution which limited the power of government, provided a humane penal code, and guaranteed many fundamental liberties. For the first time in modern history, a large society offered equal rights to people of different races and religions. Penn's dramatic example caused quite a stir in Europe. The French philosopher Voltaire, a champion of religious toleration, offered lavish praise. 'William Penn might, with reason, boast of having brought down upon earth the Golden Age, which in all probability, never had any real existence but in his dominions'.
[Ref: 54272]   £690.00  
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