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Castle of Zohauk-I-Maran.
Castle of Zohauk-I-Maran. British Commandant of Shah Shoojau's 2nd Janbaz Cavalry and Afghan Troopers of the Corps.
Handcoloured lithograph. Sheet: 440 x 315mm (17¼ x 12¼"). Some staining. Large diagonal crease through left corner.
A view of Afghanistan showing Afghan soldiers who fought with the British for Shah Shuja-ull-Mulk (1785-1842) during the First Afghan war. From 'Sketches in Afghanistan' by James Atkinson (1780-1852), 'Superintending Surgeon of the Army of the Indus, Bengal Division' during the ill-fated British expedition into Afghanistan (1838-42). A Persian scholar and linguist, Atkinson has been described as 'a Renaissance man among Anglo-Indians'. Because of his languages he met many of the Afghan protagonists, including both Shah Shoojah-ool-Moolk and Dost Mohammad Khan. Fortunately he left the British garrison in 1840 to take another post, thus avoiding the disastrous retreat from Kabul in 1842. In his book 'The Expedition into Afghanistan', also published 1842, he compared the British presence in Afghanistan to Sisyphus rolling his stone up the hill.
Abbey Travel: 508.
[Ref: 41354]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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The Troops Emerging from the Narrow Part of the Defile.
The Troops Emerging from the Narrow Part of the Defile.
[J. Atkinson.]
[London: H. Graves & Co., 1842.]
Sepia tinted lithograph heightened in white, image 250 x 365mm. 9¾ x 14¼".
Anglo-Indian troops with camels on a narrow mountain pass observed by commanding officers in the foreground. The First Anglo-Afghan War was fought between British India and Afghanistan from 1839 to 1842. From 'Sketches in Afghaunistan' by James Atkinson of the East India Company’s Bengal Medical Service. Lithography by Louis and Charles Haghe.
Abbey Travel: 508, 11. British Library: 000135888.
[Ref: 20457]   £250.00   (£300.00 incl.VAT)
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Dooraunee Shepherds.
Dooraunee Shepherds.
London Published by Richard Bentley, New Burlington Street, Regent S.t. Printed in colour at A. Ducôtés Lithographic Estab.t 70, S.t Martins Lane. [n.d., c.1839.]
Hand-coloured lithograph, rare. Sheet: 225 x 145mm (9 x 5¾").
A portrait of two Afghan shepherds. An illustration from Mountstuart Elphinstone's 'An Account of the Kingdom of Caubul...'
[Ref: 47240]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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Entrance Into Kojak Pass from Parush.
Entrance Into Kojak Pass from Parush.
[James Atkinson.]
[n.d., c.1842.]
Tinted lithograph. Sheet: 330 x 515mm (13 x 20¼'').
A view of a mountain pass through which a crowd of men and soldiers walk attented by tribesmen. Plate 9 from 'Sketches in Afghanistan' by James Atkinson, one of the earliest studies of Afghanistan.
[Ref: 50134]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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Afghaun Foot Soldiers in their Winter Dress,
Afghaun Foot Soldiers in their Winter Dress, with entrance to the Valley of Urgundeh.
[L.t James Rattray] Day & Son, lith.rs to the Queen.
London, Published by Hering & Remington, 137 Regent Street. [1848.]
Tinted lithograph with very fine hand colour. Sheet 420 x 585mm (16½ x 23") with very large margins.
Two Afghan 'Rangers', members of a British irregular unit raised in Kohistan, north-east of Kabul. Their commander, Lieutenant Maule of the Artillery, described having his hands full trying to impose discipline among these "wild, unruly, merry fellows"; Maule, his subaltern and white NCOs were all murdered by their troops in November 1841, two months after Rattray had left the area. The artist, James Rattray (1818-54), a second lieutenant in the 2nd Grenadiers of the Bengal Army, served in Afghanistan during the First Afghan War (1839-42), taking part in the famous retreat from Kabul, manning the rear guard. This lithograph is from the second edition of Rattray's 'Scenery, Inhabitants, & Costumes, of Afghaunistan from Drawings made on the Spot', published the year after the first.
Abbey: Travel 513.
[Ref: 51338]   £480.00  
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Bala Hissar, or Citadel of Cabul.
Bala Hissar, or Citadel of Cabul.
S. Bull Sc.t
Published by Henry Colburn, Great Marlborough Street, 1844.
Steel engraving. Plate 127 x 203mm. 5 x 8". Trimmed to the plate top and bottom.
The Bala Hissar is the famour citadel of Kabul, built during the 5th century B.C. It served as the prime defensive shelter for the ruler of Afghanistan. The Citadel was destroyed in 1879 by General Roberts during the Second Anglo-Afghan War.
[Ref: 20166]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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Bameen and Choolghoola.
Bameen and Choolghoola.
[Drawn by James Atkinson, lithographed by Louis & Charles Haghe.]
[London: H. Graves & Co., 1842.]
Tinted lithograph with large margins. Printed area 290 x 380mm (11½ x 15").
A view looking past a group of camping Afghans towards the acropolis of Bamyan. Bamyan has gained infamy as one of the places that the British captives, including Lady Sale and Vincent Eyre, were held after the retreat from Kabul and as the home of the two vast Buddhas dynamited by the Taliban in 2001. From 'Sketches in Afghaunistan' by James Atkinson (1780-1852), 'Superintending Surgeon of the Army of the Indus, Bengal Division' during the ill-fated British expedition into Afghanistan (1838-42). A Persian scholar and linguist, Atkinson has been described as 'a Renaissance man among Anglo-Indians'. Because of his languages he met many of the Afghan protagonists, including both Shah Shoojah-ool-Moolk and Dost Mohammad Khan. Fortunately he left the British garrison in 1840 to take another post, thus avoiding the disastrous retreat from Kabul in 1842. In his book 'The Expedition into Afghanistan', also published 1842, he compared the British presence in Afghanistan to Sisyphus rolling his stone up the hill.
Abbey Travel: 508.
[Ref: 35506]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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Dost Mahomed Khan and part of his family.
Dost Mahomed Khan and part of his family. Dost Mahomed Khan. Hyder Khan. Mahomed Akram Khan. Abdool Ghunee Khan.
Sketched at Calcutta. E.E. [Emily Eden] 1841. [Lithographed by Lowes Dickinson.]
[London: J. Dickinson & Son, 1844.]
Rare tinted lithograph. Sheet 460 x 370mm (18 x 14½"), with large margins.
Head and shoulders portraits of Dost Mohammed Khan, his two sons Muhammad Akram Khan and Haider Khan, and his cousin Abd al-Ghani Khan, from Emily Eden's 'Portraits of the Princes & Peoples of India'. Dost Mohammed Khan had been Emir of Afghanistan until he was deposed by the British in 1839 at the beginning of the First Afghan War and exiled to Mussoorie. He returned to the throne after the disasterous conclusion to the war for the British. The Hon. Emily Eden, the seventh daughter of William Eden, first baron Auckland, accompanied her brother, George, Lord Auckland (1784-1849) to India, where he served as Governor-General from 1835-1842. A highly gifted amateur artist and writer, Eden recorded her observations of life in India during this period in the form of letters and an extensive collection of sketches, meeting people like Dost Mohammed using her brother's influence. On her return to England in 1842, Eden arranged to have her images printed privately as a portfolio of 24 lithographs.
[Ref: 53226]   £360.00  
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His Late Majesty Shah Shujah Ul Mulk.
His Late Majesty Shah Shujah Ul Mulk.
[n.d. c.1850.]
Lithograph on india. Sheet 241 x 152mm. 9½ x 6".
Shuja Shah Durrani (1785-1842), was ruler of the Durrani Empire from 1803 to 1809 and again from 1839 until his death, he was the fifth King of Afghanistan.
See Ref: 20776 for successor.
[Ref: 20777]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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Town and Citadel of Ghuznee.
Town and Citadel of Ghuznee.
[L.t James Rattray] W.L.Walton, lith: Day & Son, lith.rs to the Queen.
London, Published by Hering & Remington, 137 Regent Street. [1848.]
Tinted lithograph with very fine hand colour. Sheet 420 x 585mm (16½ x 23") with very large margins.
A view of Ghazni, a walled city with an elevated citadel in eastern Afghanistan, protecting the main road to Kabul. It was captured by the British on July 23, 1839, during the First Anglo-Afghan War (1839-42) The artist, James Rattray (1818-54), a second lieutenant in the 2nd Grenadiers of the Bengal Army, served in Afghanistan during the First Afghan War (1839-42), taking part in the famous retreat from Kabul, manning the rear guard. This lithograph is from the second edition of Rattray's 'Scenery, Inhabitants, & Costumes, of Afghaunistan from Drawings made on the Spot', published the year after the first.
Abbey: Travel 513.
[Ref: 51336]   £380.00  
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Jugdelluk, The Last Stand Made by General Elphinstone's Army in the Calamitous Retreat.
Jugdelluk, The Last Stand Made by General Elphinstone's Army in the Calamitous Retreat.
[L.t James Rattray] Day & Son, lith.rs to the Queen.
London, Published by Hering & Remington, 137 Regent Street. [1848.]
Tinted lithograph with very fine hand colour. Sheet 420 x 585mm (16½ x 23") with very large margins.
Jagadalak, where the remnants of the army of General William Elphinstone that had occupied Kabul during the First Anglo-Afghan War (1839-42) were destroyed. The artist, James Rattray (1818-54), a second lieutenant in the 2nd Grenadiers of the Bengal Army, served in Afghanistan during the war, taking part in the famous retreat from Kabul, manning the rear guard. This lithograph is from the second edition of Rattray's 'Scenery, Inhabitants, & Costumes, of Afghaunistan from Drawings made on the Spot', published the year after the first.
Abbey: Travel 513.
[Ref: 51337]   £350.00  
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The Main Street in the Bazaar at Caubul in the Fruit Season.
The Main Street in the Bazaar at Caubul in the Fruit Season.
[J. Atkinson.]
[London: H. Graves & Co., 1842.]
Sepia tinted lithograph heightened in white, image 250 x 365mm. 9¾ x 14¼".
A busy market scene in Kabul, the capital and largest city of Afghanistan. The First Anglo-Afghan War was fought between British India and Afghanistan from 1839 to 1842. From 'Sketches in Afghaunistan' by James Atkinson of the East India Company’s Bengal Medical Service. Lithography by Louis and Charles Haghe.
Abbey Travel: 508, 20. British Library: 000135888.
[Ref: 20459]   £350.00  
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Fort of Mahomed Khan. - near Cabul.
Fort of Mahomed Khan. - near Cabul.
[Drawn by James Atkinson, lithographed by Louis & Charles Haghe.]
[London: H. Graves & Co., 1842.]
Tinted lithograph with large margins. Printed area 290 x 380mm (11½ x 15").
A view looking past a group of camping Afghans to the fortress of Dost Mohammad Khan (1793-1863). It was his negotiations for help from the Russians that led the British to invade Afghanistan in 1839. Forced into exile by the British, he returned in triumph in 1842. During the British invasion the Battle of Ghazni (July 23rd 1839) was a significant victory: the loss of the city caused the Afghan ruler, Dost Muhammad, to ask for terms of surrender, but finding them unacceptable, he fled Kabul. From 'Sketches in Afghanistan' by James Atkinson (1780-1852), 'Superintending Surgeon of the Army of the Indus, Bengal Division' during the ill-fated British expedition into Afghanistan (1838-42). A Persian scholar and linguist, Atkinson has been described as 'a Renaissance man among Anglo-Indians'. Because of his languages he met many of the Afghan protagonists, including both Shah Shoojah-ool-Moolk and Dost Mohammad Khan. Fortunately he left the British garrison in 1840 to take another post, thus avoiding the disastrous retreat from Kabul in 1842. In his book 'The Expedition into Afghanistan', also published 1842, he compared the British presence in Afghanistan to Sisyphus rolling his stone up the hill.
Abbey Travel: 508.
[Ref: 35508]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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Fortress of Alimusjid, and the Khybur Pass.
Fortress of Alimusjid, and the Khybur Pass.
[L.t James Rattray] W.L.Walton, lith: Day & Son, lith.rs to the Queen.
London, Published by Hering & Remington, 137 Regent Street. [1848.]
Tinted lithograph with very fine hand colour. Sheet 420 x 585mm (16½ x 23") very large margins.
A view of the Khyber Pass and the fortress of Ali Masjid, which overlooked the narrowest part of the pass and was garrisoned by the forces of Dost Mohammed. The artist, James Rattray (1818-54), a second lieutenant in the 2nd Grenadiers of the Bengal Army, served in Afghanistan during the First Afghan War (1839-42), taking part in the famous retreat from Kabul, manning the rear guard. He was sent to the pass to take the fortress but, as he finished sketching this scene, ''suddenly a report was heard, and, to my utter astonishment, walls and bastions composing the fortress blew up simultaneously in the air, like a whirlwind of sand; and so completely was it swept off from the summit of the mountain, that when the dense cloud cleared away not a vestige of the building remained''. From the second edition of Rattray's 'Scenery, Inhabitants, & Costumes, of Afghaunistan from Drawings made on the Spot', published the year after the first.
Abbey: Travel 513.
[Ref: 51335]   £350.00  
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Amir Dost Mahomed Khan.
Amir Dost Mahomed Khan.
[n.d. c.1860.]
Lithograph on india. Sheet 222 x 146mm. 8¾ x 5¾".
Amir Dost Mohammad Khan (1793-1863) ruled as King of Afghanistan twice, firstly from 1826 to 1839 and then again from 1843 to 1863. During the first Anglo-Afghan War he surrendered himself to the British and was sent to India. After his son lead the battle that defeated the British, he returned to power and captured Kandahar in 1855 and Herat in 1863.
See Ref: 20777 for predescessor.
[Ref: 20776]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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Oberster Theil einer Tempelruine in Kabulistan.
Oberster Theil einer Tempelruine in Kabulistan.
gez. v. Goldhann nach Elphinstone. J.s Jung. Sc.
[n.d., c.1820.]
Engraving. Sheet: 115 x 190mm (4½ x 7½''). Foxing.
A view of the ancient theatre in Kabul, Afghanistan remains of the Ancient Greeks who inhabited the area during the expedition of Alexander the Great.
[Ref: 50515]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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