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[Embarkation of Charles II from the Netherlands to England, 1660]
[Embarkation of Charles II from the Netherlands to England, 1660]
AV. Venne Inv P. Philippe Fc: 1660
Etching, sheet 300 x 380mm (11½ x 14¾"). Trimmed to image, losing letterpress text above and below; fold through centre as normal.
When parliament proclaimed Charles II king and invited him to return in 1660, he turned down invitations from France and Spain to embark for England from their territory, instead accepting an invitation from the Dutch states general. This print shows him departing for England from Scheveningen on 23 May 1660 (he arrived there in triumph six days later). One of six illustrations published in 'Verhael van de Reys van Carel II, Coning van Groot-Brittannië, in Hollandt van 25 Mey tot 2 Junij 1660', a volume published in the Hague in 1660. Engraved after Adriaen van de Venne (1589-1662), Dutch artist and poet who lived in the Hague from 1625 onwards. He played an active role in the Guild of St Luke in the city.
[Ref: 42871]   £280.00   (£336.00 incl.VAT)
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[Charles II issuing the declaration of Breda, 1660]
[Charles II issuing the declaration of Breda, 1660]
T.vliet in. T. Matham fc.
Etching, 17th century watermark; sheet 345 x 460mm (13½ x 18"). Trimmed to image; crease through centre as normal.
Charles II issuing the declaration of Breda, which stated the terms on which he was prepared to return to England as king. The declaration was issued on 4 April 1660, and a little over a month later Charles II was proclaimed king by both houses of parliament in England. Charles II turned down invitations from France and Spain to embark for England from their territory, instead accepting an invitation from the Dutch states general. He sailed from Breda to Delft by yacht, from there to the Hague, and eventually departed for England from nearby Scheveningen on 23 May 1660 (he arrived triumphantly in London six days later). One of six illustrations published in 'Verhael van de Reys van Carel II, Coning van Groot-Brittannië, in Hollandt van 25 Mey tot 2 Junij 1660', a volume published in the Hague in 1660 describing and depicting the king's journey through the Netherlands to England. Engraved after Jacob Toorenvliet (1641-c.1719), painter and printmaker based in Leiden.
[Ref: 42873]   £390.00  
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[Charles II making a speech at the Estates General of Holland]
[Charles II making a speech at the Estates General of Holland]
[Anon., 1660]
Etching, sheet 355 x 460mm (13¾ x 18"). Trimmed; crease through centre as normal.
Charles II on right, standing under a canopy, with Count Willem Frederik and Prince Jan Maurits either side. Soon after issuing the declaration of Breda on 4 April 1660, Charles II was proclaimed king by both houses of parliament in England. He turned down invitations from France and Spain to embark for England from their territory, instead accepting an invitation from the Dutch states general. He travelled from Breda to Delft, from there to the Hague, and eventually departed for England from nearby Scheveningen on 23 May 1660 (he arrived triumphantly in London six days later). One of six illustrations published in 'Verhael van de Reys van Carel II, Coning van Groot-Brittannië, in Hollandt van 25 Mey tot 2 Junij 1660', a volume published in the Hague in 1660 describing and depicting the king's journey through the Netherlands to England. Engraved after Jacob Toorenvliet (1641-c.1719), painter and printmaker based in Leiden.
[Ref: 42874]   £280.00   (£336.00 incl.VAT)
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[Charles II's Departure for England.] Qvo Fas Et Fata Nos Vocant.
[Charles II's Departure for England.] Qvo Fas Et Fata Nos Vocant.
N. Venne: P. Philippe Fe: 1660.
Engraving. Very scarce. 17th century watermark; Sheet: 310 x 390mm (12¼ x 15¼"). Trimmed and tipped into album sheet; crease as normal.
A scene showing Charles II's departure for England from Scheveningen to reclaim the crown of England, Scotland and Ireland in May 1660. The scene shows Charles standing on the beach about to board a boat decorated with a crown, a huge crowd forms around made up of people and carriages. In the distance several canon are fired in salute.
[Ref: 42947]   £450.00  
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De KoningVertrekt met syn Broeders van Schevelingen.
De KoningVertrekt met syn Broeders van Schevelingen.
[n.d. c.1685.]
Etching. 95 x 108mm. 3¾ x 4¼".
Charles II preparing to embark at Scheveningen. Anonymous engraving probably Dutch from a Broadside that would have small engravings arranged in rows or alternatively around one central etching.
[Ref: 17471]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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[Netherlands] Martinus Trompius H.F. Hollandiæ et occidentalis Frisiæ Rerum Maritimarum Vicepræfectus.
[Netherlands] Martinus Trompius H.F. Hollandiæ et occidentalis Frisiæ Rerum Maritimarum Vicepræfectus.
H.Pot Pinxit. I.Suiderhoef Sculp.
[n.d., c.1680.]
Engraving. 410 x 320mm. Trimmed to plate.
Maarten Tromp (1598-1653), Dutch admiral, killed by a sharpshooter in the battle of Scheveningen against the English. Half-length portrait within decorative border.
[Ref: 4707]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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Admiral Penn. One of Cromwell's Admiral's who took Jamaica from the Spaniards from the Original Picture.
Admiral Penn. One of Cromwell's Admiral's who took Jamaica from the Spaniards from the Original Picture.
Sr. P. Lely pinxt. R. Earlom sculpt.
London Published by S. Woodburn, 1811.
A fine mezzotint impression. Image 158 x 108mm. Cut to the image and surrounded by an extra paper sheet.
Sir William Penn (1621-1670) was an English admiral, and the father of William Penn, founder of the colony of Pennsylvania. He served his apprenticeship at sea with his father. In the first Civil War he fought on the side of the parliament, and was in command of a ship in the squadron maintained against the king in the Irish seas. The service was arduous and called for both energy and good seamanship. In 1648 he was arrested and sent to London, but was soon released, and sent back as rear admiral in the Assurance. The exact cause of the arrest is unknown, but it may be presumed to have been that he was suspected of being in correspondence with the king's supporters. In the First Anglo-Dutch War, he served in the navy of the Commonwealth of England, commanding squadrons at the battles of the Kentish Knock (1652), Portland, the Gabbard and Scheveningen (1653). In 1654 he accepted the naval command in the expedition to the West Indies sent out by Cromwell. In 1655 he commanded the fleet that launched a bungled attack on La Hispaniola. Afterwards the less desirable island of Jamaica was seized for the Commonwealth regime. On their return he and his military colleague Venables were sent to the Tower. He made humble submission, and when released retired to the estate he had received from confiscated land in Ireland. In the Second Anglo-Dutch War he was captain of the fleet at the Battle of Lowestoft in 1665 under James Stuart, Duke of York.
[Ref: 12693]   £75.00   (£90.00 incl.VAT)
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Scheveningen, Holland. [in pencil.]
Scheveningen, Holland. [in pencil.]
W. Haeburn Little [signature in pencil.]
[n.d. c.1940.]
Etching. 190 x 166mm. 7½ x 6½".
Scheveningen is one of the eight districts of the Hague. It is a modern seaside resort.
[Ref: 14448]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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[Battle of Scheveningen, 1653]
[Battle of Scheveningen, 1653] Abbildung des Bludigen See Treffens Zwischen den Hollandern und Engellandern, so drey tage gewehret Geschehen im Augusto, Anno 1653.
[Anon., c.1655]
Engraving, scarce; 300 x 375mm (11¾ x 14¾"). 18th century impression; creases; laid on backing sheet.
German print showing the Battle of Scheveningen in 1653, the final battle of the first Anglo-Dutch war. The British had blockaded the Dutch coast and the battle was the result of Dutch attempts to lift the blockade. Both sides claimed victory- the English because of their greater losses to Dutch, and the Dutch because the blockade was lifted. Detailed key identifying ships and key personnel, including the ship of the Dutch commander Maarten Tromp (killed in battle) right foreground, and those carrying the English admirals George Monck and William Penn.
[Ref: 33751]   £360.00  
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[Last Battle of Admiral Tromp.] Laeste Zeeflach van M.H. Tromp Admirael van Hollandt: etc Tegen die van Engelandr 1653.
[Last Battle of Admiral Tromp.] Laeste Zeeflach van M.H. Tromp Admirael van Hollandt: etc Tegen die van Engelandr 1653.
[n.d., c.1653.
Engraving. Sheet: 120 x 155mm (4¾ x 6¼"). Trimmed, some loss in left edge. Folds as normal.
A view showing the Battle of Scheveningen fought between the English and Dutch during the First Anglo-Dutch War in which Admiral Tromp was killed by a sharpshooter while climbing the rigging of Sir William Penn's ship.
[Ref: 42949]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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