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A private Marine of Col. Fourgeouds' Corps.
A private Marine of Col. Fourgeouds' Corps.
Blake Sculp.t.
[n.d., c.1793.]
Engraving. Sheet size: 260 x 210mm (10¼ x 8¼"). Trimmed inside plate.
A soldier holding a gun, facing the viewer, with a fort in the distance to the left, and a ship at sea to the right. A plate from the first volume of J.G.Stedman's 'Narrative of a five years' expedition against the revolted slaves of Surinam' (London 1796). 'Blake's sixteen engravings are ranked among his "most interesting and important book illustrations". (Ryskamp, p.10)
[Ref: 38909]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
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A private Marine of Col. Fourgeoud's Corps.
A private Marine of Col. Fourgeoud's Corps.
Blake Sculp.t
[London, Published Dec.r 2d. 1793 by J. Johnson, St. Paul's Church Yard.]
Etching and engraving. 260 x 210mm. 10¼ x 8¼".
Colonel Fourgeoud was Stedman’s commanding officer. Stedman found him an incompetent and callous leader but passages expressing his anger and contempt towards Fourgeoud were edited out of the Narrative. Published in "Narrative, of a Five Years’ Expedition, Against the Revolted Negroes of Surinam, in Guiana, on the Wild Coast of South America", by Captain John Gabriel Stedman. The Dutch captured the British colony of Suriname during the Second Anglo-Dutch War (1667). Under the West India Company it was developed as a plantation slave society and became a primary destination for the Dutch slave trade. The brutal regime caused high mortality; despite the import of 300,000 slaves between 1668 and 1823, the population never grew beyond 50,000. ‘Maroonage’ became the major form of resistance. Fugitive slaves, or ‘maroons’, escaped inland to form permanent communities from where they waged a campaign of guerrilla warfare against the Dutch. In 1774 the Scottish-Dutch soldier John Gabriel Stedman witnessed the brutal oppression of slaves during a campaign against the maroons, which he described in this book. The work contained 80 engravings by various hands which are generally acknowledged to have been based on drawings made by Captain J.G. Stedman, although only two of the plates bear his name. Stedman was a personal friend of William Blake’s and it is likely that William Blake modified Stedman’s designs, being those of an amateur artist. From the sole surviving watercolour by Stedman for this work, it is known that the engravers involved were allowed considerable liberty in adapting Stedman’s designs. The book was adopted by those who advocated the abolition of the slave trade, though Stedman was thought to support reform rather than abolition.
In the Victoria and Albert Museum.
[Ref: 25886]   £90.00   (£108.00 incl.VAT)
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