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[View of Ballasore Roads]
[View of Ballasore Roads] Rade, de la Balasore
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 490 x 355mm (19¼ x 13¾"). Central fold as issued; uncut sheet.
View from the harbour in Balasore, which 'offers nothing but the sea to the view'. The letterpress published with the print explains how the sea is 'frequented by different sorts of vessels', including 'large ships from Bombay, Surate, and other parts of the western coasts', schooners from the Ganges From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33640]   £480.00  
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[Busso-Jun / The throwing the images of the Gods into the water]
[Busso-Jun / The throwing the images of the Gods into the water] Bousso-Djeng
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 495 x 360mm (19½ x 14¼"). Uncut sheet; central fold as issued.
'The religious festivals of the Hindoos consist in worshipping the images of the gods, offering up sacrifices (poojahs) and spending the remainder of the day in entertainments, dances and other amusements...in that which we are now describing, after having carried the gods in procession during several days, they convey their images to the river; and place them on the edge of two boats drawn alongside each othert. There, their adoration is followed by the grossest invectives, and the most violent imprecations...to terminate this strange and inexplicable demeanour, the two boats are separated, and the images of the gods precipitated into the river amidst the acclamations of the multitude. 'The engraving represents this moment. In the foreground is a sideview of the boats and of the position of the gods as well as of the brahmuns, the musicians, and principal actors in the ceremony. In another distance the boats are represented in front to give an idea of their separation; on the right are the assistants and spectators. 'The principal figure is that of the goddess Calkee, wife of Shieb, the genius of evil' (from letterpress published with print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33663]   £320.00  
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[A North-Wester off Calcutta]
[A North-Wester off Calcutta] Nord Ouest
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark 490 x 350mm (19¼ x 13¾"). Central fold as issued; uncut sheet.
View to the north-west of Calcutta, documenting on the frequent storms, which take their name from the direction of the wind. The accompanying letterpress described 'a dreadful noise which seems to announce the confusion of all the elements. The clouds thicken, and are torn by continual flashes of lightning; the thunder roars, and torrents of rain often deluge the country...the river then assumes the appearance of a boisterous sea, and sometimes overwhelms the vessels which have not had the prudence to fly for shelter to the creeks or canals'. From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33637]   £420.00  
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T'Cherout.
T'Cherout.
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 355 x 245mm (9½ x 13¾"). Uncut sheet.
'It is sufficient to say that the Cheroot is the seegar [cigar], all the lower classes of Hindoos who can not afford a Hooka must be content with a Cheroot which they themselves make' (from letterpress published with print). From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33654]   £240.00   (£288.00 incl.VAT)
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Djonlen-Jatrah.
Djonlen-Jatrah. [Swinging of Kistna]
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching printed in colour with hand-colouring, platemark approx 495 x 360mm (19½ x 14¼"). Uncut sheet; central fold as issued.
'The object of this feast is to celebrate the Incarnation of Kistna. The God is represented in the fore ground of the engraving; attended by his comparnions, and his favourite Radica. His mother, Jussudhah, is placed behind him, holding a lamp with five branches, as a spell to preserve her son from the enchantments of his numerous mistresses' (from letterpress published with print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33669]   £350.00  
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Dole-Jatrah.
Dole-Jatrah. [Celebration of the Orgies of Kistna]
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 495 x 360mm (19½ x 14¼"). Uncut sheet; central fold as issued.
Hindu religious festival 'believed to be a celebration of the orgies of Kistna with his mistresses and companions. As there is a religious tradition that they cast a red powder on each other, the Hindoos, upon this occasion, fling upon one another a fine earth of the same colour...It takes place like all the others [festivals] before the house of some rich Hindoo, and in sight of a temple where the Brahmuns from time to time throw a little red earth, which they call holie upon their gods. Outside are musicians, who, with different instruments and very great noise, proclaim and celebrate the feast' (from letterpress published with print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33664]   £320.00  
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[Elephants and Camels]
[Elephants and Camels] Éléphants & Chameaux
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 490 x 355mm (19¼ x 13¾"). Central fold as issued; uncut sheet.
'The elephants in the print are represented eating the leaves and the bark of some shrubs of which they break the branches with their trunk; they have all of them one of their legs pinched with a piece of wood, wich [sic] prevents their making their escape. At a distance are some camels following a corps of troops. The landscape is a pass in the Carnatic, the only entrance is by narrow roads' (from letterpress published with print). From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33645]   £490.00  
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[Ferry, or Passage on the Ganges]
[Ferry, or Passage on the Ganges] Ferry
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 490 x 355mm (19¼ x 13¾"). Central fold as issued; uncut sheet.
Ferry across the Ganges, 'with the company going over, which is composed of women of the lower classes and their children, of Coulies or day labourers, Faquirs, Jemidars, etc. These boats are at times so overloaded, that they get over with the greatest difficulty: they sometimes even sink, and disappear for ever with all the passengers...what is most remarkable, [is that] the Hindoos do not make the slightest effort to save themselves from perishing in the Ganges: they are persuaded that, whatever accident may happen to them in passing that river, proceeds immediately from the express will of God...' (from the letterpress published with this print). From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33638]   £420.00  
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Bazar.
Bazar.
[by Balthazar Solvyns.]
[Published Paris, 1811.]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 490 x 355mm (19¼ x 13¾"). With letterpress description in French and English. Central fold as issued; uncut sheet.
'There are at present in Hindoostan few Bazars frequented exclusively by Hindoos: this which the print represents is of that number' (from accompanying letterpress). The scene shows merchants selling fish, meat, fruit and vegetables. 'An European who is satisfied with a simple diet may live very cheap in India, but once luxuries are admitted, the expence of the table becomes enormous, particularly respecting wines'. From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33642]   £480.00  
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Baoulya
Baoulya
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 245 x 350mm (9½ x 13¾"). Uncut sheet.
'This species of boat is the swiftest we know...An example among others cited is of a governor general who in his Baawalee-a performed in eight days the voyage from Lucknow to Calcutta, a distance of four hundred marine leagues' (from letterpress published with print). From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33650]   £280.00   (£336.00 incl.VAT)
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Beyde.
Beyde. [Physician]
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching printed in colour with hand-colouring, platemark approx 360 x 250mm (14¼ x 9¾"). Uncut sheet.
'Menu gives the descent of Physicians from a Brahmun and a woman of the cast of Byces or Merchants. Their age in general gains them the credit of experience, which ensures to them great respect. They pursue a system of medicine traced out in the sacred writings, and from which they are not allowed to depart. As they are deprived too of instruction by the inspection of dead bodies, they are totally deficient in anatomical knowledge. 'The carved wood seen in the plate, and which is called bursah-caut, is placed in commemoration of the dead before the houses, in the bazars or markets, on the high roads, near the pagods, or on the stairs which lead to the river, where the greater number of them are to be seen, because there the Hindoos prefer to terminate their career' (from letterpress published with the print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33671]   £360.00  
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Causto.
Causto.
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 355 x 245mm (9½ x 13¾"). Uncut sheet.
A causto from Calcutta. 'He who is drawn here wrote in one of the public offices, and was perhaps the only one in the town of Calcutta' (from letterpress published with the print). Many caustos were employed as writers by the government or by foreign merchants. From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33659]   £450.00  
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Jeux
Jeux
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 355 x 245mm (9½ x 13¾"). Uncut sheet.
Hindus playing chess and dominoes, and smoking. From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33657]   £280.00   (£336.00 incl.VAT)
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Daybuc.
Daybuc. [Astronomer]
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching printed in colour with hand-colouring, platemark approx 360 x 250mm (14¼ x 9¾"). Uncut sheet.
Hindu astronomer. 'He who is the subject of the plate is sitting before his house, calculating an eclipse. Before him are his tablets, and in his hand the chalk with which he writes on a blackened board. He was often consulted by the learned, even from Europe, and expressed himself with great accuracy and precision' (from letterpress published with the print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33672]   £320.00  
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Fyl-Tcharra
Fyl-Tcharra
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 245 x 350mm (9½ x 13¾"). Uncut sheet.
'The word Feal-charra means elephant's head: and the boat represented in the print take this name from their prow...the Radjahs only, and rich people of the country, make use of them' (from letterpress published with print). From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33653]   £280.00   (£336.00 incl.VAT)
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[Horse richly caparisoned, and a Tattou]
[Horse richly caparisoned, and a Tattou] Cheval richement caparaçonné et Tattou.
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 245 x 350mm (9½ x 13¾"). With letterpress description in French and English. Uncut sheet.
Arabian horse, 'the race most esteemed in Hindoostan, of which considerable numbers are constantly imported...the horse near the Arabian is a Tattou, or one of the Hindoo race. For size and beauty he bears no comparison with the other, but is superior to him for use...' (from accompanying letterpress). From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33647]   £320.00  
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[Jugglers]
[Jugglers] Jongleurs
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 245 x 350mm (9½ x 13¾"). With letterpress description in French and English. Uncut sheet.
Indian performers: in foreground sword-swallower on left, a juggler on right 'whose tricks are less perillous', and (centre) a man who juggles with 'two canon balls of thirty or forty pounds weight'. The figure at the top of the image is 'a woman who lies flat, upon an iron plate which turns round upon a sharp point fixed on the top of a bambou' (quotations from accompanying letterpress). From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
see also ref. 15034.
[Ref: 33648]   £340.00  
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Mohabharat or Chorah.
Mohabharat or Chorah. [Explaining of the Text and Commentaries of the Mohabaurut by a Brahmun]
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808.]
Etching printed in colour with hand-colouring, platemark approx 495 x 360mm (19½ x 14¼"). Uncut sheet; central fold as issued.
'The Brauhmun, adorned with red flowers, is seated on an eminence or little hill of earth, holding in his hands the poitahs or leaves of trees upon which is engraved the text of the Mohabaurut, one of the sacred books of the Hindoos. Upon a stool before him are other poitahs, and opposite to him the salgram stone, the sunk or shell, and the guntah or bell' (from letterpress published with print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33679]   £320.00  
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Mourpenky
Mourpenky
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 245 x 350mm (9½ x 13¾"). Uncut sheet.
'Moor-punkee means peacocks head' (hence the design of the prow). 'The prince or leading person of the Moor-punkee is seated smoking his hooka under a particular canopy, in front of all the others. The grandees and servants of his retinue are under another awning. At the head of the rowers is a Jemidar, who, by his voice and his motions, regulates the measure like the leader of an orchestra...' (from letterpress published with print). From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33652]   £280.00   (£336.00 incl.VAT)
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Rahouths.
Rahouths.
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching printed in colour with hand-colouring, platemark approx 360 x 250mm (14¼ x 9¾"). Uncut sheet.
'This tribe, who inhabit a mountainous country, form...a military cast, and esteems themselves superior to the others, asserting that they, as well as the Ouriahs, descend from the first inhabitants of Hindoostan, which adds not a little to their pride...many of them are seen in the service of the grandees of the country, as well as foreigners...they are well looking and have something of a military air; but are nevertheless seldom employed in the service of the house, as they would not easily bear the subjection of domestic attendance. They run before the palanquin, go on messages, carry letters, etc' (from letterpress published with the print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33674]   £280.00   (£336.00 incl.VAT)
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Sounnar-Banyahs.
Sounnar-Banyahs. [Money-changers]
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching printed in colour with hand-colouring, platemark approx 360 x 250mm (14¼ x 9¾"). Uncut sheet; central fold as issued.
'The money changers who are also called shroffs, are at the same time bankers. They are good calculators, and lend upon pledges at a very high interest. In general, their principal characteristic is their avidity and ostentatious luxury...they are, as stockholders, at the head of the most considerable trading houses of Hindoostan...they acquire also great importance from the power which they exercise in regulating every orning the price of exchange of notes (hourdies) and of coins, which determines that of every article in the bazars or markets...' (from letterpress published with the print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33667]   £350.00  
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Tillys.
Tillys. [Retailers]
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching printed in colour with hand-colouring, platemark approx 360 x 250mm (14¼ x 9¾"). Uncut sheet; central fold as issued.
Retailers of daily articles (rice, spices, wood, fruit etc), who also change money. 'The plate represents a retailer sitting upon his little board, in the middle of his shop. The Tillys have a spoon which they use with great dexterity to take up the articles that are called for. They wrap up the smaller objects in plantain leaves. One of these leaves also serves to write the accounts of their different sales' (from letterpress published with the print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33666]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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[Vessels of all sorts]
[Vessels of all sorts] Navires
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 245 x 350mm (9½ x 13¾"). With letterpress description in French and English. Uncut sheet.
Various indian vessels: 'Here are the high vessels of the Red sea and Persian gulph, the Grabs, the ships of the Maldive isles, made of bambous and coconut trees, masts cordage and anchors. The boats employed in the pearl fishery on the coast of Ceylan, the Vliegers of Batavia, the Proues of Malacca, remarked for their swiftness: the Catamarans of Madras, and infine the Chinese Jonques' (from accompanying letterpress). Also shown, a European frigate. From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33649]   £280.00   (£336.00 incl.VAT)
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Nariel Hooka.
Nariel Hooka.
[by Balthazar Solvyns.]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 245 x355mm (9½ x 13¾"). Uncut sheet.
Hindu smoking a Narial Hooka. From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33655]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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[Snake Hooka]
[Snake Hooka] Houka à Tuyau
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1811]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 245 x355mm (9½ x 13¾"). Uncut sheet.
The Snake Hookah: 'This is the Hooka of the richer classes, and that which the Europeans have adopted...this instrument which frequently costs seveal hundred pounds, becomes an object of great expence' (from letterpress published with print). From the third volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33656]   £240.00   (£288.00 incl.VAT)
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Horry-Seng-Karten.
Horry-Seng-Karten.
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching printed in colour with hand-colouring, platemark approx 495 x 360mm (19½ x 14¼"). Uncut sheet; central fold as issued.
'Hurry is the name given to Vestno incarnate for the conservation of the human race. Hurry-Sung-Kartun is that of a religious festival celebrated in honour of the god. 'A Vestnub Brahmun recites the incarnation and the life of Hurry, whose loves are also the subject of his song. What relates to this latter part is repeated by other Vestnubs, to the sound of various instruments, the baunt, the mirdun and the kurtaul' (from letterpress published with print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33670]   £360.00  
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Mahrattes.
Mahrattes.
[by Balthazar Solvyns.]
[Published Paris, 1808.]
Etching printed in colour with hand-colouring, platemark approx 360 x 250mm (14¼ x 9¾").
A bare-footed Maratha, from the Indian warrior caste found predominantly in the state of Maharashtra, with a sheathed sword in his hands. From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33681]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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[Nila-Pooja / Various Expiations of the Hindoos]
[Nila-Pooja / Various Expiations of the Hindoos] Nylah-Poudjah
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 495 x 360mm (19½ x 14¼"). Uncut sheet; central fold as issued.
'At night, when the j'haump, of which we have already spoken, is over, the most zealous performers of expiations ressort in crowds to the munders or pagodas. There, some of them pierce their tongues with long irons, and even with a sort of cutlass or other large instrument; some get their fingers bored, and suffer iron spikes of a considerable size to remain in them; others have one hundred and twenty wounds of the same size inflicted on their foreheads, their breasts or their backs: this number, of which the mysterious amount remains unknown to us, is rigorously enjoined. Some, in fine, there are, who cause their loins to be pierced, and pass cords, the pipe of the hooka, and reeds, through the aperture, in the form of a seton. 'In this manner they go in procession the whole of the following day, stopping to dance before the doors of such as pay them; for the rich profit of these expiations through their money, and redeem their sins by the sufferings of the poor: which, in the creed of the Hindoos, is not less efficacious, nor less agreeable to God. Their march is accompanied with the sound of instruments and the acclamations of the crowd; perfumes are burned in the hands of certain Hindoos, which being probably prepared to resist the effect of the fire give something of a miraculous appearance to the feast..The feast which is celebrated with the greatest solemnity of expiatory ceremonies and tortures is that of the god Calkee. At three miles distance from Calcutta, the author was present at it. In the interior of the temple the feet waded in blood' (from letterpress published with print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33662]   £280.00   (£336.00 incl.VAT)
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Radjepouts.
Radjepouts.
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching printed in colour with hand-colouring, platemark approx 360 x 250mm (14¼ x 9¾"). Uncut sheet.
'These Hindoos, who bear the name of the country which they inhabit, form a military cast connected with that of the K'hutterys, of whom we have already spoken...they serve as soldiers for pay, preferring those who offer most. For this reason probably they are so numerous in the English armies...The Rajpoot represented in the engraving is leaning carelessly against a tree: his dress is not military, because we profess to treat only of the distinction of casts by Menu, the Hindoo legislator' (from letterpress published with the print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33673]   £260.00   (£312.00 incl.VAT)
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[Rhaaumien-Gauyin / Brahmus Chanting the Exploits of Rhaum]
[Rhaaumien-Gauyin / Brahmus Chanting the Exploits of Rhaum] Ramayin-Gayin
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 495 x 360mm (19½ x 14¼"). Uncut sheet; central fold as issued.
Brahmin singing the exploits of Rhaum (he waves a silver stick with black horse-hair attached to the end). The ceremony takes places in the court of a Hindu residence. 'The women can see or be seen only through a grating of bambou. Those who are in the varanda, or gallery, are the women of an inferiour class, who are more free to shew themselves in public' (from letterpress published with print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33661]   £320.00  
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Routh-Jatrah.
Routh-Jatrah. [Procession of the Gods in their Car]
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching printed in colour with hand-colouring, platemark approx 495 x 360mm (19½ x 14¼"). Uncut sheet; central fold as issued.
'This festival, one of the most solemn among the Hindoos, is celebrated once every year in the month of assar, which answers to our month of june. The object is to celebrate the travels of Kistna with Radica; and it consists in dragging with great pomp, the god, his mistress, and his companions, in a sort of edifice or pagoda constructed in wood, and adorned with tolerable sculpture. These relievos, and its hieroglyphic paintings are too obscene to admit of representation. With this exception the engraving gives an exact idea of this species of building, which is called Routh. Two horses of wood painted blue appear to draw, and a Brahmun to guide, it, while the machine placed upon a number of small, but very solid wheels, is moved in reality by two cords which are grasped by the most zealous among the thousands of attendants of both sexes and of every age and sect' (from letterpress published with print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33668]   £320.00  
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Porteurs de L'Ouriahs caste.
Porteurs de L'Ouriahs caste.
[by Balthazar Solvyns.]
[Paris, 1808.]
Etching, printed in colour and hand-finished. 280 x 245mm (11 x 9¾").
A porter carying a parasol, a litter in the background. From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33915]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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Tchan-Jatrah.
Tchan-Jatrah. [Celebration of the Bath of Juggernaut]
[by Balthazar Solvyns]
[published Paris, 1808]
Etching with hand-colouring, platemark approx 495 x 360mm (19½ x 14¼"). Uncut sheet; central fold as issued.
'The Hindoos believe that the god Juggernaut transports himself, in one night, from his pagoda at Cattach, in Oorisah, to the spot where the ceremony of the bath is performed near Serampore, on the banks of the Ganges. Upon the day of his arrival, they wash and bathe him, and take great care to keep him warm on account of the fever which the cold has given him. After this he does not stir out until his return, which takes place after about three months, at the end of the rainy season...The representation of Juggernaut consists only of an head and part of the arms. To the unfinished form is attached the sublime idea, that it is not for man to represent the divinity under material forms, lowering as it were the dignity and omnipotence of the godhead by supposing it in human shape...Thousands of Hindoos contemplate with transport the Brahmun, who, several times a day, throws a vase of water from the Ganges on this unformed idol' (from letterpress published with print). From the first volume of Balthazar Solvyns' 'Les Hindoûs'. Solvyns (1760-1824), a Flemish artist who lived in Calcutta from 1791 to 1803, etched a collection of 250 plates documenting various aspects of Calcutta life. The set was first published in Calcutta, where it proved a financial failure, and Solvyns produced another set which he published in Paris after returning to Europe, although again the venture was unsuccessful, probably in part due to its publication at the height of the Napoleonic Wars. Solvyns later returned to Antwerp, where William I appointed him Captain of the Port.
[Ref: 33665]   £350.00  
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