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Le Comte de Kevenhuller Veld Maréchal, et General ~ Commandant des Armées de Sa Majesté la Reine díHongrie &c. en Baviére ~
Le Comte de Kevenhuller Veld Maréchal, et General ~ Commandant des Armées de Sa Majesté la Reine díHongrie &c. en Baviére ~
J. Meitens Pinxit à Vienne. G. Bickham Sculp. London.
Publish'd by Wm. Meyer according to Act of Parliament; August 1742. Sold by Henry Overton without Newgate London 1745.
Copper engraving. 317 x 216mm. 12½ x 8½". Trimmed to the plate.
Ludwig Andreas von Khevenhüller, (1683-1744), Austrian field-marshal who came of a noble family that was originally from Franconia and had settled in Carinthia. He first saw active service under Prince Eugene of Savoy in the War of the Spanish Succession and by 1716 had been given command of Prince Eugene's own regiment of dragoons. He distinguished himself at the battles of Peterwardein (5 August 1716) and Belgrade (1717), and became in 1723 Major-General of Cavalry (General-Feldwachtmeister), in 1726 proprietary colonel of a regiment and in 1733 Lieutenant-General (Feldmarschalleutnant). After the Battle of Guastalla (19 September 1734), his skilful generalship won for him the grade of General of Cavalry. He continued in military and diplomatic employment in Italy to the close of the war. In 1737 Khevenhüller was made Field Marshal, Prince Eugene recommending him to his sovereign as the best general in the service. Khevenhüller surpassed himself in the War of the Austrian Succession. As commander-in-chief of the army on the Danube he not only drove out the French and Bavarian invaders of Austria in a few days of rapid marching and sharp engagements (January 1742), but overran southern Bavaria, captured Munich, and forced a large French corps in Linz to surrender. On his return to Vienna, Maria Theresa decorated the field marshal with the Order of the Golden Fleece. He died suddenly at Vienna on 26 January 1744.
[Ref: 19468]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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