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[Life of Aesop: Aesop convicting his fellow servants of having eaten the figs.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop convicting his fellow servants of having eaten the figs.] [So thrive false witnesses...]
[Etched by Thomas Dudley after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Aesop, having beeen accused of eating his master's figs, has vomited to show he had eaten nothing, then insists his accusers do the same, proving their guilt. Plate 1 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life" (1687), to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.235, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48708]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Aesop resolving the gardener's problem.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop resolving the gardener's problem.] [No more you learned fops...]
Tho: Dudley fecit [after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
A gardener asks of Xanthus why his cultivated herbs did not grow as well as wild ones. Aesop replied that Mother Nature regarded them as step-children rather than her own. Plate 7 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life" (1687), to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.241, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48712]   £110.00   (£132.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Aesop ordered by Xanthus to take a dish to her that loves him best.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop ordered by Xanthus to take a dish to her that loves him best.] [A Wife, or Dog, as certaine reasons prove...]
Tho: Dudley fecit 1678 [after Francis Barlow].
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Xanthus, Aesop's master, hands a dish of meat to Aesop, expecting him to give it to his wife. However Aesop gives in to a dog, seen in the background. Top right are musicians in a gallery Plate 8 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life", to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.243, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48699]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Aesop serving tongues.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop serving tongues.] [The maryed men afronted at the jest...]
[Etched by Thomas Dudley after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Aesop, ordered to serve a dinner of the best, serves up tongues at every course to Xanthus and his guests. When confronted, Aesop replies ''What excels the tongue? It is the great channel of learning and philosophy''. Plate 10 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life" (1687), to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.252, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48715]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Aesop taken to prison.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop taken to prison.] [How vaine are mens designes...]
Tho: Dudley fecit [after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Having found treasure for Xanthus, Xanthus still orders Aesop to be imprisoned. Aesop complains of the bad faith and is released. Plate 14 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life" (1687), to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.247, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48710]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Beaten by Xanthus.] [Philosophers like Fortune-tellers thrive,
[Life of Aesop: Beaten by Xanthus.] [Philosophers like Fortune-tellers thrive, / Those by false notions, these false flateries live, / And those as oft true vertue do mistake, / As these false auguries, and predictions make.]
[Etched by Thomas Dudley after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 200 x 165mm (8 x 6½"). Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Aesop as a slave on Samos, being beaten by his owner Xanthus for saying he had seen two crows, when only one was in sight. Plate 16 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life", to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.249, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48698]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Aesop interpreting an inscription on a tomb, thereby discovering a treasure.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop interpreting an inscription on a tomb, thereby discovering a treasure.] [How poore is man whom sordid interest sways...]
Tho: Dudley fecit [after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Aesop agrees to decypher an inscription and find the treasure in return for his freedom. After he digs it up, Xanthus reneges, but Aesop tricks him into giving Aesop half the trove. Plate 19 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life", to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.250, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48704]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)

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[Life of Aesop: Aesop interpreting to the Samians the portent of the eagle and the public ring.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop interpreting to the Samians the portent of the eagle and the public ring.] [In vaine the learned do their knowledge boast...]
Tho: Dudley fecit [after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Aesop agrees to decypher a portent and, in doing so, forces his master Xanthus to give him his freedom. Plate 20 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life" (1687), to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.251, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48709]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)

Unfortunately this item is either sold or reserved. If you are interested in similar items and cannot find what you're looking for on our website, please consider filling in our interests form. If you register, we can also send you items that match your interests when the website is updated.


[Life of Aesop: Aesop kneeling before king Croesus.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop kneeling before king Croesus.] [Of all the graces, Heaven in man designd...]
[Etched by Thomas Dudley after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Aesop negotiates with Croesus to prevent war between Lydia and Samos. Plate 21 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life" (1687), to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.252, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48714]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Aesop welcomed on his return to Samos from the court of Lydia.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop welcomed on his return to Samos from the court of Lydia.] [When eloquence the stubborn powers assailes...]
[Etched by Thomas Dudley after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, small tear, mounted on album paper.
Aesop, having negotiated peace with his former master Xanthus of Lydia, steps off a boat with an olive branch in his hand, and is welcomed by the rulers of Samos, with a band of horns and trumpets. Plate 22 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life", to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.259, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48707]   £110.00   (£132.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Aesop falsely accused by Eunus, his adopted son.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop falsely accused by Eunus, his adopted son.] [To what vast heights had Aesop's glory run...]
Tho: Dudley fecit [after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Eunus had forged letters, apparently from Aesop offering his services to foreign kings. Aesop is condemned to death and Ennus is given Aesop's estates as a reward. Plate 23 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life", to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.241, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48713]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Aesop in the sepulchre fed by Hermippus.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop in the sepulchre fed by Hermippus.] [So pitied falls the innocent accused...]
[Etched by Thomas Dudley after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Eunus, Aesop's adopted son, forged papers that inplicated Aesop in treason. King Lycerus ordered Hermippus to put Aesop to death, but instead he hid Aesop until he was reprieved. Plate 24 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life", to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.255, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48701]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Eunus confronted by Aesop.]
[Life of Aesop: Eunus confronted by Aesop.] [Ungrateful Eunus how could you betray...]
[Etched by Thomas Dudley after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Eunus, Aesop's adopted son, forged papers that inplicated Aesop in treason. When Aesop is vindicated, Ennus is condemned to death, but Aesop intercedes oh his behalf and re-adopts him. However, shamed, Eunus can be seen flinging himself from a cliff behind. Plate 26 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life", to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.257, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48700]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Aesop with King Nectenabo, king of Egypt.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop with King Nectenabo, king of Egypt.] [How vaine are mens designes...]
Tho: Dudley fecit [after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Nectenabo challenged Xanthus to build a tower that touches neither earth nor heaven. Aesop trains eagles to carry children in baskets, travels to Egypt and tells Nectenabo they are the workmen for the tower and requests Nectenabo send the building materials to them. Nectenabo replies he has no men that can fly and admits defeat. Plate 27 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life", to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.258, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48711]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: the death of Aesop.]
[Life of Aesop: the death of Aesop.] [Reader reflect upon this scene of woe...]
T D [Thomas Dudley] fecit [after Francis Barlow].
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Aesop, on a diplomatic mission to Delphi from King Croesus of Lydia, was sentenced to death on a trumped-up charge of temple theft, and is thrown from a cliff. Plate 30 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life", to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.259, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48706]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Aesop bought by the philosopher Xanthus.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop bought by the philosopher Xanthus.] [How poore's the price...]
Tho: Dudley fecit [after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper.
Aesop bought in a slave market. Plate 5 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life", to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.239, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48702]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Life of Aesop: Aesop passing the house of the father of Xanthus's wife.]
[Life of Aesop: Aesop passing the house of the father of Xanthus's wife.] [Insulting women while their slaves obey...]
Tho: Dudley fecit [after Francis Barlow.]
[Amsterdam: Etiènne Roger, 1714.]
Proof etching. Sheet 205 x 165mm (8 x 6½") Trimmed within plate, mounted on album paper. Letterpress overprinting.
Having caused Xanthus's wife to leave him, Aesop stands outside her father's house telling a servant that Xanthus would be celebrating his second marriage the following day, the wife listening. She soon rushed home. Plate 9 of thirty-one illustrations added to the second edition of Barlow's "Æsop's Fables, With His Life", to illustrate the translation of Planudes's Life of Aesop, which was unillustrated in the first edition of 1666. This example comes from an Amsterdam edition, 'Les Fables d'Esope', with the printing plate trimmed down. All of the plates were designed by Barlow: they were etched c.1678-9, only five by Barlow; the rest, including this one, by Thomas Dudley. Originally the plate extended down with a title verse (possibly written by Aphra Behn, who wrote new verses for the fables), but for this non-English edition the verse was trimmed off and new borders engraved. Little is known of Dudley: on one plate of this series he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar; and in 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter. He etched some portraits but these prints after Barlow are his most important work.
BM: 1871,0812.242, described as a proof state.
[Ref: 48703]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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Philosophers like Fortune-tellers thrive,
Philosophers like Fortune-tellers thrive, / Those by false notions, these false flateries live, / And those as oft true vertue do mistake, / As these false auguries, and predictions make.
[Etched by Thomas Dudley after Francis Barlow.]
[London, 1687.]
Etching. Sheet 250 x 170mm (9¾ x 6¾"). Trimmed within plate on three sides, paper toned.
Aesop being beaten by Xanthus for saying he had seen two crows, when only one was in sight. One of thirty-two illustrations to the 2nd edition of 1687 of Barlow's Aesop, showing scenes from his life. Aesop began life as a slave in Samos, owned by Xanthus.
[Ref: 40312]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[Aesop welcomed on his return to Samos]
[Aesop welcomed on his return to Samos] When Eloquence the stuborne powers assailes, / It oft beyond dull brutall force prevailes [...]
[Thomas Dudley after Francis Barlow, 1678/9]
Etching, platemark approx. 240 x 165mm (9½ x 6½").
One of thirty-two illustrations to the second (1687) edition of Francis Barlow's Aesop, showing scenes from the life of the Greek storyteller. All of the plates were designed by Barlow but only five were etched by him. The rest, including this one, were etched by Thomas Dudley (1678-9, fl.). Little is known of Dudley- he signed himself as a student of Wenceslaus Hollar in one print and while he etched some portraits, his prints after Barlow are his most important work. In 1679 he went to Lisbon, where he is known to have made further prints, and he is not supposed to have returned to England thereafter.
[Ref: 47305]   £70.00   (£84.00 incl.VAT)
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[Part of frontispiece to 'Secrets of Art and Nature']
[Part of frontispiece to 'Secrets of Art and Nature']
[Ric. Gaywood Sculp]
[1660]
Etching, 65 x 160mm. 2½ x 6¼". Trimmed and glued to backing sheet.
Top part of the frontispiece to 'Secrets of Art and Nature, being the Summe and Substance of Naturall Philosophy ... First designed by John Wecker ... and now much Augmented and Inlarged by Dr R. Read' (London, Simon Miller, 1660). Shows portraits of Saint Alberto Magnus and Alexis of Piedmont, author of 'The secretes of the Reuerende Maister Alexis of Piedmont containing excellent remedies against diuers diseases, woundes, and other accidentes, with the maner to make distillations, parfumes [...]' (1592).
BM 1884,1213.36 (full frontispiece)
[Ref: 15827]   £60.00   (£72.00 incl.VAT)
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Diversæ Avium Species Studiosissime ad Vitam delineatæ Per Fra: Barlow Insignissim: Anglum Pictorem.
Diversæ Avium Species Studiosissime ad Vitam delineatæ Per Fra: Barlow Insignissim: Anglum Pictorem.
H. Terasson Fecit London [in cartouche.]
Printed for Rob.t Sayer at the Golden Buck in Fleet Street. [n.d., c.1755.]
Etching; 18th century watermark. 210 x 300mm (8¼ x 11¾"). Creasing; small margins.
A cartouche with three birds, one in flight, with trees and church in background, and a dovecote on the left. Pencil drawing of a man verso. Plate 9 of an edition of Francis Barlow's 'Various Birds' published c.1755.
[Ref: 48157]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Royal Coat of Arms]
[Royal Coat of Arms] Carolo Dei Gratia Fidei Defensori Anno Restaurato DDD CLVIIIII
R. Gaywood fecit [1660]
Etching, sheet 255 x 180mm (10 x 7"). Text and tomb of Charles I verso.
Illustration from 'The Sphere of Gentry' (1661) by the herald-painter Sylvanus Morgan. Although not credited here, the painter and etcher Francis Barlow (d.1704) is known to have worked on designs for the book's illustrations. British Museum cataloguing states that Barlow's hand is visible in the rendering of the lion and unicorn in this print.
[Ref: 42828]   £230.00   (£276.00 incl.VAT)
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[A farmyard with hen and chicks.]
[A farmyard with hen and chicks.]
Fra: Barlow delin.
P.Tempest Excud. [n.d., engraved c.1680 but 18th century impression.]
Etching. 135 x 180mm (5¼ x 7"), very large margins. Paper lightly toned.
This print was orginally published in Francis Barlow's ''Multae et diversae avium species variis formis et pernaturalibus figuris per Fra. Barlow Anglum''. This later state has the pagination '3.c.' bottom left.
[Ref: 44167]   £70.00   (£84.00 incl.VAT)
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[Hens attacked by an eagle.]
[Hens attacked by an eagle.]
Fra; Barlow delin. Fra: Place fecit.
P.Tempest Excud. [n.d., engraved c.1680 but 18th century impression.]
Etching. 140 x 185mm (5½ x 7¼"), 18th century watermark very large margins. Paper lightly toned.
An eagle swooping down into a farmyard. The print was orginally published in Francis Barlow's ''Multae et diversae avium species variis formis et pernaturalibus figuris per Fra. Barlow Anglum''. This later state has the pagination '5.c.' bottom left.
BM 1835,0711.2.
[Ref: 44091]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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[A farmyard with chickens and pig.]
[A farmyard with chickens and pig.]
Fra: Barlow delin. Fra: Place fecit.
P.Tempest Excud. [n.d., engraved c.1680 but 18th century impression.]
Etching. 135 x 180mm (5¼ x 7"), very large margins. Paper lightly toned.
A cockeral, hens & chickens, a pig's head poking out from a sty. The print was orginally published in Francis Barlow's ''Multae et diversae avium species variis formis et pernaturalibus figuris per Fra. Barlow Anglum''. This later state has the pagination '4.c.' bottom left.
[Ref: 44166]   £70.00   (£84.00 incl.VAT)
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Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of England, Scotland, France and Ireland,
Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, and the Territories Thereunto Belonging.
Engrav'd by Cha.s Turner, from the celebrated print by W. Faithorne.
London: Published by S. Woodburn, 112, St Martin's Lane [n.d, 1816.]
Mezzotint. 390 x 265mm (15¼ x 10½") very large margins. Staining at top.
A full-length portrait of Oliver Cromwell after Francis Barlow, in armour, surrounded by allegorical detail. The title of William Faithorne's original engraving, published in 1658, is within the image: 'The Embleme of Englands Distractions As also of her attained, and further expected Freedome & Happiness'. Published in 'Fifteen Splendid Portraits of Royal Personages'.
Ex. collection of the Hon. Christopher Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 40267]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
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[Dogs and cats in a yard.]
[Dogs and cats in a yard.]
[Richard Gaywood.]
[British, n.d., c.1680.]
Etching, 140 x 210mm. 5½ x 8¼".
A greyhound and spaniel looking up at two squirrels in a tree upper right; two cats lower right, a mastiff chained to a thatched building at left, and a forth dog sitting at centre of composition. From a series of plates showing groups of animals, numbered '10' lower right. The composition derives from Francis Barlow's drawing of three dogs and two cats, which was etched in reverse by Gaywood for 'Variae quadrupedum species'. Gaywood modified this design, including another dog at bottom centre and another cat at lower right, and has removed one of the original cats and added the tree with squirrels in the background. This appears to be a reissue of his plate, with the number and a 'Y' added (upper right).
[Ref: 19465]   £60.00   (£72.00 incl.VAT)
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[An eagle flying holding a chick in its talons.]
[An eagle flying holding a chick in its talons.]
Fra; Barlow delin. Fra: Place fecit.
P.Tempest Excud. [n.d., engraved c.1680 but 18th century impression.]
Etching. 140 x 185mm (5½ x 7¼"), 18th century watermark. Paper lightly toned, small margins trimmed.
An eagle fyling over buildings, taking a bite from the captured chick. The print was orginally published in Francis Barlow's ''Multae et diversae avium species variis formis et pernaturalibus figuris per Fra. Barlow Anglum''. This later state has the pagination '10.c.' bottom left.
BM 1850,0223.865.
[Ref: 44092]   £80.00   (£96.00 incl.VAT)
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The Kings Burds.
The Kings Burds.
F. Barlow pinx.
I. Smith ex.
Very fine mezzotint, 235 x 175mm (9¼ x 6¾"). Collector's stamp of Frederick Augustus II of Saxony. Trimmed to plate, glued on album sheet at edges.
A scene showing various animals, including ducks, geese with goslings a plumed bird and a pet monkey reaching up at a long-billed bird perched on a broken column on the left. A squirrel is visible on a tree in the background.
[Ref: 59546]   £420.00  
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[Ram stood before a flock of sheep]
[Ram stood before a flock of sheep]
F. Barlow delin.
P. Tempest ex. [c.1690] Bit later
Etching, 18th century watermark; sheet 105 x 150mm (4 x 6"). Small margins.
Etching after Francis Barlow (probably by Jan Griffier), from one of the sets of designs after Barlow published by Pierce Tempest between 1680 and 1694. Barlow (c.1626-1704) was one of the finest English printmakers of the seventeenth century, whose work included illustration, political satire, natural history plates and playing cards.
[Ref: 47677]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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View on the River Wye near Bakewell in Derbyshire.
View on the River Wye near Bakewell in Derbyshire.
Granger sculp.t
[n.d. c.1780.]
Engraving. 228 x 323mm. 9 x 12¾". Trimmed to the plate along upper edge and sides. Small hole on right by tree.
A view on the River Wye, for Barlow's "General History of Europe". A fishing scene.
[Ref: 18893]   £85.00   (£102.00 incl.VAT)
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[James Scott, duke of Monmouth]
[James Scott, duke of Monmouth] Illustrissimus et Potentissimus Princeps Jacobus Dux de Monmouth & Bucclugh [...]
FB
Sold by S. Lye at the Oval Frame against the South Sea House in Bishop gate Street [c.1680].
Etching, sheet 340 x 260mm (13¼ x 10¼"). Trimmed; glued to backing sheet at edges.
James Scott, duke of Monmouth and first duke of Buccleuch (1649-1685), politician, on horseback. Monmouth was the eldest illegitimate son of Charles II and his mistress, Lucy Walter. He was executed in 1685 after making an unsuccessful attempt to depose his uncle, King James II (the 'Monmouth Rebellion'). Etched by Francis Barlow (d.1704), painter and etcher who designed sets of natural history plates, and also made propaganda prints supporting the Whig cause during the Popish Plot (an alleged Catholic conspiracy to assassinate Charles II) of 1679.
[Ref: 43029]   £360.00  
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[Spaniel with game birds.]
[Spaniel with game birds.]
F.Barlow delin.
J. Smith excud. [n.d., c.1690.]
Mezzotint, fine. 145 x 200mm (5¾ x 8"). Thread margins.
A hunting dog, seated on a bank watching a bouquet of pheasants feeding in front of it; in the background a man on a horse being led by a groom and a distant landscape beyond a gate.
CLB: state ii of iii. Ex: Collection of The Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 44164]   £420.00  
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