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Catalogue: Miscellanea
[Architectural detail by John Soane?]
[Architectural detail by John Soane?]
Lin: Inn Fields Feb:y 2.d 1797 [ink mss.]
Ink and wash. Sheet 680 x 560mm (26¾ x 22"). Folds, some creasing and slightwear to folds.
A sketch with features labelled ''Architrave for doors and windows full size'' in old ink mss.
[Ref: 44976]   £950.00  
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[A set of original illustrations by Neave Parker for 'Bombus, the Bumble-Bee'.]
[A set of original illustrations by Neave Parker for 'Bombus, the Bumble-Bee'.]
[Some larger images signed 'Neave Parker'; one dated 1939 by the artist. All are stamped '13 August 1939' to verso.]
Ten pen & ink drawings on scraperboard, cut to various sizes: six c.325 x 205mm, 12¾ x 8"; the rest 190 x 145mm (7½ x 5¾"), or smaller. Various pen and pencil annotations to margins and versos; all are captioned with their intended positions in the text, i.e. 'chap 3 page 31'. Larger images also with relevant quotation, and marked 'full page'. The group includes a 'frontispiece', 'contents page', and 'tailpiece'. Pinholes to margins; extremities generally a little bumped and creased. Altogether a fine set.
The book by Ray Palmer, one of the 'Animals All' series of children's books, was first published in London by T. Nelson & Sons in 1940. A unique archive of charming images of insect and other animal and plant life that features a hedgehog, shrew, field mouse and a swallow catching bees on the wing. W. Neave Parker (1910 - 1961) worked as a surveyor for a short while before going on to serve in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, working in the Photographic Unit. After making the acquaintance of Maurice Burton, a scientific associate at the Natural History Museum and also honorary science editor at the Illustrated London News, he began to produce animal illustrations. The first of his drawings of prehistoric animals appeared in the Illustrated London News on 30 September 1950. He became an accomplished scientific illustrator and the National History Museum commissioned him to do a series of picture postcards; the museum retains the 19 original drawings for this series. Parker also illustrated numerous children's books. His drawings are held in the Ulster Museum and he was the subject of an exhibition there entitled, ' The Prehistoric World of Neave Parker' in 1993.
See BL W.P.5331/2.
[Ref: 25331]   £450.00  
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A Table of English Silver Coins. No. 1 [&] A Table of English Gold Coins. No. 2.
A Table of English Silver Coins. No. 1 [&] A Table of English Gold Coins. No. 2.
Sumptibus Societatis Antiquariæ Lond. [n.d., c.1760.]
Pair of engravings. Each 270 x 450mm, 10½ x 17¾".
A pair of engraved tables listing the types of coins issued by English monarchs, silver ones from 1066, gold since Edward III in 1344, both within a decorative frame-like border.
[Ref: 26856]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT) view all images for this item
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[Charles I's Death Warrant.]
[Charles I's Death Warrant.]
Suptibus Societat. Antiquariæ Lond. 1750.
Hand coloured engraving. 420 x 480mm.
An unusual engraving of the Warrant, set within a memorial cartouche. See Ref: 21804 uncoloured impression.
[Ref: 1233]   £220.00  
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First Chin'as Sons, with early art elate, [/] Form'd the gay Teapot, and the pictured plate...
First Chin'as Sons, with early art elate, [/] Form'd the gay Teapot, and the pictured plate...
[n.d., c.1880.]
Embossed card with ink and watercolour letterpress. Card: 215 x 265mm (8½ x 10½"). Foxing.
An embossed card with decorated letterpress, the poem discusses Chinese porcelain and its decoration. Above the text are four vignettes showing Chinese men at their craft.
[Ref: 46147]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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Bathurst, Lord Bathurst.
Bathurst, Lord Bathurst.
[n.d. c.1812.]
Copper engraving. 260 x 171mm. 10¼ x 6¾".
Earl Bathurst, of Bathurst in the County of Sussex. Here the representative coat of arms, particuarly for Henry Bathurst, 3rd Earl Bathurst (1762-1834) the British politician. He was MP for Cirencester and owing primarily to his friendship with William Pitt he was a lord of the admiralty from 1783 to 1789; a lord of the treasury from 1789 to 1791; and commissioner of the board of control from 1793 until 1802. he returned to office with Pitt in 1804 and became Master of the Mint, and was President of the Board of Trade until 1812 when he became Secretary of State for War and the Colonies under Lord Liverpool, during this time the Australian regional town of Bathurst, New South Wales was named after him.
[Ref: 18976]   £80.00   (£96.00 incl.VAT)
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Doggiana, by Cynophilus.
Doggiana, by Cynophilus. A Poet is a lank Greyhound; for the Public her runs game down...
Printed by C. Hullmandel. [n.d., c.1827]
Lithograph. Watermark 'Fellows' 1824. Sheet: 275 x 220mm (10¾ x 8¾"). Some marking.
A frontispiece to 'Doggiana' showing a dog in clothes standing above a pyramid.
[Ref: 42712]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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Lenox Duke of Richmond.
Lenox Duke of Richmond.
[n.d., c.1800.]
Engraving. Plate: 170 x 105mm (6¾ x 4") large margins.
The coat-of-arms of the Duke of Richmond with the moto 'En la Rose Je Fleure'.
[Ref: 45727]   £45.00   (£54.00 incl.VAT)
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[Facsimile of the patent of nobility granted to Edmund Dunch by Oliver Comwell.]
[Facsimile of the patent of nobility granted to Edmund Dunch by Oliver Comwell.] Oliver by the Grace of God Lord Protector of the Commonwealth...
Longmate sculp.
[London, 1787.]
Engraving. 270 x 285mm (10½ x 11¼"), possibly signed by the author, very large margins. Paper toned.
A patent of nobility giving the title of Baron Burnell of East Wittenham to Edmund Dunch (1602-78), MP for Wallingford during the trial of Charles I and governor of Wallingford Castle. His was the only Baronage made by Cromwell not renewed by Charles II, although he was not exempted from the general pardon at the Restoration. From Noble's ''Memoirs of the Protectorate-House of Cromwell''. A signature, 'Mark Noble', is written in ink under the same name in the dedication.
[Ref: 44340]   £240.00  
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Geometrical Elevations of the West Fronts
Geometrical Elevations of the West Fronts of the Cathedrals of Salisbury, Norwich, St Paul's London, St Peter's Rome, and the Great Pyramid of Egypt, to one Scale.
Drawn and Etched by T.H. Clarke. Aquatinted by R. Havell. Printed by Hayward.
London, Published March, 1831 by Priestley and Weale, High Street, Bloomsbury. Proofs on India Paper s8/ _ Plain s6/.
Etching with aquatint, proof on india. 320 x 465mm (12½ x 18¼"). Repairs.
[Ref: 46253]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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[Legal judgement]  Charta Agnetis filiae Johis Blundi Aaroni filio Isaac, Fluriae Filiae Toscei, & Iaobo filio suo, Judaeis de Anno 1231 & 15o. Hen: 3y.
[Legal judgement] Charta Agnetis filiae Johis Blundi Aaroni filio Isaac, Fluriae Filiae Toscei, & Iaobo filio suo, Judaeis de Anno 1231 & 15o. Hen: 3y.
ex Autographis penes Ric. Rawlinson L.L.D. R.S.S & AT socii Anno 1753. [British, c.1750s.]
Engraved facsimile of a Latin legal document, probably an adjudication. A much shorter, four-line Latin text, lettered to a scroll, below. Two documents printed from a single folding plate, depicted with their official wax seals. 400 x 220mm. 15¾ x 8¾". Watermarked laid paper. Fold splitting; some soiling and staining. Trace of pen annotations to verso.
The original documents are from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24715]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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[Edward III and Westminster Abbey c.1330]  Mandatum Edw. III. an regn.II. Abbati & Conventu Westm. de tollendo lapide e Scotia olim deportato & Reginae Suae Matri tradendo.
[Edward III and Westminster Abbey c.1330] Mandatum Edw. III. an regn.II. Abbati & Conventu Westm. de tollendo lapide e Scotia olim deportato & Reginae Suae Matri tradendo.
Ex Autographo penes Capit: Westmonast: in aere incidi curavit Ric. Rawlinson L.L.D.B. et ANT.SS. 1753.
Engraved facsimile of a royal proclamation in Latin to the Abbot and Canons of Westminster Abbey, signed by the King. Watermarked laid paper, sheet 135 x 290mm. 5¼ x 11½". Several fold creases, some splitting at edges or centre. A little soiled and stained.
The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24719]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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[Papal Decree by Innocent IV.]
[Papal Decree by Innocent IV.]
Ex Autographa Inocentii P.IIII Leonorae Henrici III Angl. R. Conjugi Concessa Anno 1250. Penes Ric: Rawlinson L.L.D. et R.S.S. in aere excusa anno MDCCXLI [1741]. [British, c.1770.]
Engraved facsimile of a papal missive in Latin to King Henry III of England. Official papal seal and signature below. Wove paper, large margins, 260 x 220mm, 10¼ x 8¾". Horizontal fold creases, mostly marginal foxing.
The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24720]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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[de Somery family charter]  Carta Confirmacionis [in Excambium] inter Adam de Sumeri et Henricum filium Henrici de London de Tempore Regis Johannis.
[de Somery family charter] Carta Confirmacionis [in Excambium] inter Adam de Sumeri et Henricum filium Henrici de London de Tempore Regis Johannis.
Ex Autographo penes Ric. Rawlinson L.L.D. R.S. et AT. S.S. An.MDCCLIV [1754].
Engraved facsimile of a late 12th/early 13th century agreement in Latin between Adam de Sumari (de Somery) and 'Henry'; seal below text. 175 x 275mm, 7 x 10¾". Faintly time-stained; diagonal crease through upper right corner.
The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24739]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[Durham Cathedral]  Donatio Terrarum in Wotton, Escoumbe, et Stanhope (Episcopatu Dunelmensi) a Dno Antonio Dunelm. Epo. Concessarum, Waltro de Berineton et Heredibus.
[Durham Cathedral] Donatio Terrarum in Wotton, Escoumbe, et Stanhope (Episcopatu Dunelmensi) a Dno Antonio Dunelm. Epo. Concessarum, Waltro de Berineton et Heredibus. ...Antonius de Bek al'Beake Consecrat 9. Jan. 1283. Obiit 3 Mart. 1310.
Ex Autographo penes Ric. Rawlinson, L.L.D. et R & AS. 1752.
Engraved facsimile of a c.1300 Latin illuminated manuscript authorized by Antony Bek (Beck; d. 1311), Prince Bishop of Durham; confirming receipt of a grant of land from a local landowner. With the Bishop's official seal below text. Watermarked laid paper, sheet 315 x 270mm, 12½ x 10½". Trimmed to plate. A little soiled and stained; extremities a little bumped. Trace of pen mss. to verso.
A frankalmoigne: a tenure by which a religious corporation holds lands given to them and their successors forever, usually on condition of praying for the soul of the donor and his heirs - called also tenure by free alms. The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24899]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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[Two grants of land in Yorkshire]  Confirmatio Johis de la Pomeray Johi filio Nicholai de Osgotby de Terris & in Osgotby.  [&]  Relaxatio Witti de Alreton Abbati & Monachis Scae Mariae de Kyrkestall de Terris in Alreton (Vulgo Allertn) Com. Ebor.
[Two grants of land in Yorkshire] Confirmatio Johis de la Pomeray Johi filio Nicholai de Osgotby de Terris & in Osgotby. [&] Relaxatio Witti de Alreton Abbati & Monachis Scae Mariae de Kyrkestall de Terris in Alreton (Vulgo Allertn) Com. Ebor.
ex autog penes Ric Rawlinson L.L.D. et R.S.S. 1752.
Two engraved facsimiles of c.1350 Latin manuscripts, from a single plate: a secular grant of land at Osgodby, North Yorkshire; and a gift of land at Allerton, near Bradford, West Yorkshire to Kirkstall Abbey, by a local landowner. Seals below text. Watermarked laid paper, sheet 345 x 235mm, 13½ x 9¼". Trimmed into plate at left. Tatty extremities.
A frankalmoigne: a tenure by which a religious corporation holds lands given to them and their successors forever, usually on condition of praying for the soul of the donor and his heirs - called also tenure by free alms. The original documents are from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24894]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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[Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire]  Confirmatio Robti de Berne (sia) de Annuo redditu in Calverlay Deo & scae Mariae & Monachis de Kyrkestall in perpetuam Elemosinam.
[Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire] Confirmatio Robti de Berne (sia) de Annuo redditu in Calverlay Deo & scae Mariae & Monachis de Kyrkestall in perpetuam Elemosinam. ...de Tempore Hen: 3ii.
[British, R. Rawlinson, c.1750s.]
Engraved facsimile of a c.1250 Latin grant of land around Calverley to the monastery; seal below text. Sheet 135 x 235mm, 5¼ x 9¼". Trimmed within plate.
A frankalmoigne: a tenure by which a religious corporation holds lands given to them and their successors forever, usually on condition of praying for the soul of the donor and his heirs - called also tenure by free alms. Calverley is now a village in the City of Leeds metropolitan borough in West Yorkshire. Kirkstall Abbey is now a ruined Cistercian monastery north-west of Leeds city centre in West Yorkshire, on the north bank of the River Aire. It was founded c.1152. It was disestablished during the Dissolution of the Monasteries under the auspices of Henry VIII. Kirkstall Abbey was acquired by Leeds Corporation as a gift and opened to the public in the late 19th century. The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24889]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Bolton Abbey, North Yorkshire]  Charta terrae in Bleistrete, Eboraci, a Magistro Et Conventu D. Petri, Canonicus S. Mariae de Boelton, circa temp. Steph. R.
[Bolton Abbey, North Yorkshire] Charta terrae in Bleistrete, Eboraci, a Magistro Et Conventu D. Petri, Canonicus S. Mariae de Boelton, circa temp. Steph. R.
...concessa penes Ric. Rawlinson. L.L.D. & S.R.S. [n.d., c.1750s.]
Engraved facsimile of the c.1150 Latin foundation charter of Bolton Priory; seal below text. Watermarked laid paper, sheet 245 x 180mm, 9¾ x 7". Trimmed close to and within plate. Chip to lower right edge and lower right corner.
A frankalmoigne: a tenure by which a religious corporation holds lands given to them and their successors forever, usually on condition of praying for the soul of the donor and his heirs - called also tenure by free alms. The monastery was originally founded at Embsay in 1120. Led by a prior, Bolton Abbey was technically a priory, despite its name. It was founded in 1154 by the Augustinian order, on the banks of the River Wharfe. The land at Bolton, as well as other resources, were given to the order by Lady Alice de Romille of Skipton Castle in 1154. The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24885]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Land grant, Nottinghamshire]  Confirmatio Robti de Burun de Terris in Cotegrave Deo & btae Manae & sco Johi Baptistae & btis Pauperibus scae Domus Hospitalis Tertm & frebus eiusdem Domus De sevientibus in perpetuam Elemosinam.
[Land grant, Nottinghamshire] Confirmatio Robti de Burun de Terris in Cotegrave Deo & btae Manae & sco Johi Baptistae & btis Pauperibus scae Domus Hospitalis Tertm & frebus eiusdem Domus De sevientibus in perpetuam Elemosinam. ...de Tempore Hen: 3ii. ie Nutritus familiaris qui in Domo Domini alitur.
[British, R. Rawlinson, c.1750s.]
Engraved facsimile of a Latin grant of land in Cotegrave by Robert de Burun to the hospital and brethren of St. John of Jerusalem c.1210-20; seal below text. Sheet 215 x 195mm, 8½ x 7¾". Lacking lower margin; some creasing.
A frankalmoigne: a tenure by which a religious corporation holds lands given to them and their successors forever, usually on condition of praying for the soul of the donor and his heirs - called also tenure by free alms. The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24745]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire]  Carta Adami Abbatis de Kirkstall Com. Eborac. de annua pensione Priori et Conventui de Kirkstall concessa 1252.
[Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire] Carta Adami Abbatis de Kirkstall Com. Eborac. de annua pensione Priori et Conventui de Kirkstall concessa 1252.
Penes Ric. Rawlinson, L.L.D. et R.S.S. Anno 1752.
Engraved facsimile of a Latin charter issued by Adam, Abbot of Kirkstall (1249-1259); seal below text, with large margins. 205 x 200mm, 8 x 8".
Kirkstall Abbey is now a ruined Cistercian monastery north-west of Leeds city centre in West Yorkshire, on the north bank of the River Aire. It was founded c.1152. It was disestablished during the Dissolution of the Monasteries under the auspices of Henry VIII. Kirkstall Abbey was acquired by Leeds Corporation as a gift and opened to the public in the late 19th century. The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24734]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[The Knights Templars in Yorkshire]  Charta Donationis Witti Pict (aviensis) Motendini sui & Cultura de Heddigeley Fratribus Miliciae Templi Salomonis in perpetuam Elemosinam.
[The Knights Templars in Yorkshire] Charta Donationis Witti Pict (aviensis) Motendini sui & Cultura de Heddigeley Fratribus Miliciae Templi Salomonis in perpetuam Elemosinam. ... Regnante Edvardo 1o.
penes Ric. Rawlinson L.L.D. et R.S.S. 1752.
Engraved facsimile of a c.1240 Latin gift of the mill of Headingly to the Knights Templars by a local landowner. 225 x 260mm, 8¾ x 10¼". Very small chip to right margin; a little soiled.
A frankalmoigne: a tenure by which a religious corporation holds lands given to them and their successors forever, usually on condition of praying for the soul of the donor and his heirs - called also tenure by free alms. The Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon, commonly known as the Knights Templar (or simply Templars) were among the most famous of the Western Christian military orders. Officially endorsed by the Catholic Church around 1129, the Order became a favoured charity throughout Christendom, and grew rapidly in membership and power. Templar knights were among the most skilled fighting units of the Crusades. The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24731]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire]  Concordia facta inter Abbatem et Conventum de Kyrkestall (Com: Eboracae) et Tho. de Rocheley de Homagio &c. a dicto Abbate, retentis &c. Dat.a Festo Sti. Nicolai (6 Dec.) Ao.22. Ric, II, Dui. ['1398' added in pen.]
[Kirkstall Abbey, Yorkshire] Concordia facta inter Abbatem et Conventum de Kyrkestall (Com: Eboracae) et Tho. de Rocheley de Homagio &c. a dicto Abbate, retentis &c. Dat.a Festo Sti. Nicolai (6 Dec.) Ao.22. Ric, II, Dui. ['1398' added in pen.]
Ex Autographo penes Ric. Rawlinson, L.L.D. Oxon et R. & N.S.S. 1754.
Engraved facsimile of a Christmas agreement in Latin between Kirkstall Abbey and a local landowner; seal below text. 210 x 265mm, 8¾ x 10½". Handling and folding creases. Chip to lower left margin; a little soiled.
A frankalmoigne: a tenure by which a religious corporation holds lands given to them and their successors forever, usually on condition of praying for the soul of the donor and his heirs - called also tenure by free alms. Kirkstall Abbey is now a ruined Cistercian monastery north-west of Leeds city centre in West Yorkshire, on the north bank of the River Aire. It was founded c.1152. It was disestablished during the Dissolution of the Monasteries under the auspices of Henry VIII. Kirkstall Abbey was acquired by Leeds Corporation as a gift and opened to the public in the late 19th century. The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24727]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[The Charterhouse Priory] Testimonium et concessio Obitus a Joh. Priori et Conventu domus Salutationis Dei matris ord: Cartusiens. Lond Witto Hulles.
[The Charterhouse Priory] Testimonium et concessio Obitus a Joh. Priori et Conventu domus Salutationis Dei matris ord: Cartusiens. Lond Witto Hulles. Priori &c. hosp. S Joh. Jertm pro aqueductu fibimet concesso de devotionib. pro illis in perpetuum faciendis.
In festo Assumpt B.M.V. A.D. M.CCCC.XXX [1430].
Ex autogr penes Ric. Rawlinson, L.L.D. et R.S.S. A.D. 1751.
Engraved facsimile of a Latin illuminated manuscript issued by the Prior of Charterhouse, granting a trental of masses for William Hulles, the Prior of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem. Decorative floral flourishes and seal. Watermarked laid paper, sheet 255 x 320mm, 10 x 12½". Trimmed to plate. Some puncture holes to lower part.
The London Charterhouse was the fourth house of the order of Carthusians founded in England. It flourished for nearly three centuries in prosperity, its brethren retaining a good character for severe discipline and holy life, when the storm of the dissolution broke upon them. Charterhouse School was founded by Thomas Sutton in 1611 on the site of the old monastery in Charterhouse Square, Smithfield. The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24722]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[Land grant, Yorkshire]  Charta capitalis Messuagii & Terrae in Loftus juxta Harewoode a Dno Hamone de Alta-Ripa [Dantry] Willo de Hameletone Decano Eboracensi Conecssa...
[Land grant, Yorkshire] Charta capitalis Messuagii & Terrae in Loftus juxta Harewoode a Dno Hamone de Alta-Ripa [Dantry] Willo de Hameletone Decano Eboracensi Conecssa...
ex Autographo penes Ric. Rawlinson LLD et SRS. A.D.1751. [British, c.1750s.]
Engraved facsimile of a Latin deed of transfer of land to William Hamilton, Dean of York. 150 x 240mm. 6 x 9½".
William Hamilton was deputy chancellor of England from 1286 to 1289, then Lord Chancellor from 1305 to his death on April 20, 1307. The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24714]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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[Patent of Peerage to Edmund Dunch, Baron Burnell of East Wittenham]
[Patent of Peerage to Edmund Dunch, Baron Burnell of East Wittenham] To the Right Hon.ble George Earl of Leicester; President of the Society of Antiquaries. &c [...]
Longmale sculp [1787]
Engraving, sheet 260 x 285mm (10¼ x 11¼"). Trimmed inside platemark and glued to album sheet with hand-drawn border. Rare.
Engraving of the Patent of Peerage to Edmund Dunch, Baron Burnell of East Wittenham. Dunch was a kinsman of and enobled by Oliver Cromwell. From Mark Noble's 'Memoirs of the Protectoral House of Cromwell' (2 volumes, 1784). Dedicated to George Townshend, second Marquess Townshend and earl of Leicester (1753-1811), antiquary and politician. In 1784 Leicester was elected President of the Society of Antiquaries, defeating Edward King in the first contested election in the history of the society.
Moule DCLXXII; For Townshend see refs. 36325 and 27041.
[Ref: 37358]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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[Illustrations to 'Uncle Peter. A True Story']
[Illustrations to 'Uncle Peter. A True Story'] The two creatures were lying side by side on the rug. chap 8 page 54. [&] The dogs would wait until he descended. chap 11 page 74
Neave Parker [n.d., but 1940].
Two pen & ink illustratons on scraperboard; images 205 x 135mm. 8 x 5¼" & 205 x 130mm. 8 x 5". Stamped '5 Mar 1940' to verso. With 14 others, total 16. Some wear.
A black cat and a dog in an interior, and a cat treed by two dogs, original book illustration for 'Uncle Peter. A true story...' by Harper Cory W. Neave Parker (1910 - 1961) worked as a surveyor for a short while before going on to serve in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, working in the Photographic Unit. After making the acquaintance of Maurice Burton, a scientific associate at the Natural History Museum and also honorary science editor at the Illustrated London News, he began to produce animal illustrations. The first of his drawings of prehistoric animals appeared in the Illustrated London News on 30 September 1950. He became an accomplished scientific illustrator and the National History Museum commissioned him to do a series of picture postcards; the museum retains the 19 original drawings for this series. Parker also illustrated numerous children's books. His drawings are held in the Ulster Museum and he was the subject of an exhibition there entitled, ' The Prehistoric World of Neave Parker' in 1993.
See BL W.P.5331/5.
[Ref: 25286]   £750.00  
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The Pillory.
The Pillory.
J. Chapman sc.
[Published Jan. 1804 by James Cundee, Ivy Lane.]
Stipple. Sheet size: 140 x 85mm (5½ x 3¼"). Trimmed inside plate. Slight staining.
A plate from 'The Criminal Recorder; or, Biographical Sketches of Notorious Public Characters', printed and published by James Cundee, Ivy Lane, London, illustrating the use of the pillory.
[Ref: 38044]   £45.00   (£54.00 incl.VAT)
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[Procession.]
[Procession.]
[n.d. c.1770.]
Engraving. 115 x 207mm. 4½ x 8¼".
Two horse-drawn carriages led by standard bearers; accompanied by foot-guards and staff carrying candlesticks. The horses heads of the first carriage are decorated with bells; the carriage and slips over the horses's backs carry the charge of an up-turned crescent moon.
[Ref: 20249]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[Henry VII]  A Pardon Granted by Hen. 7th given under his Signet Seal at Richmond 27th. Novr. in the 21st [year] of his Reign [c.1506] to Thos: Barker therein Nam'd in Excuse of the Matters therein suggested;
[Henry VII] A Pardon Granted by Hen. 7th given under his Signet Seal at Richmond 27th. Novr. in the 21st [year] of his Reign [c.1506] to Thos: Barker therein Nam'd in Excuse of the Matters therein suggested; from the Original in the hands of Ric. Rawlinson L.L.D. & At. R.S.F. 1754.
[British, 1750s.]
Engraved facsimile of a Royal Pardon issued (in English) by Henry VII (1457 - 1509); seal below text. 195 x 305mm, 7¾ x 12".
Henry was King of England and Lord of Ireland from his seizing the crown on 22 August 1485 until his death on 21 April 1509, as the first monarch of the House of Tudor. The original document is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24737]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[Two drawings of the coffin of Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of Charles I]
[Two drawings of the coffin of Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of Charles I]
Two drawings, one pen and ink with hand colouring (285 x 215mm, 11¼ x 8½") and the other pencil and watercolour (280 x 465mm, 11 x 18¼"); watermark I. Taylor. Both glued to backing sheets; the former having been divided separated horizontally into three, and the latter with vertical crease and watermarks to paper.
Two drawings of the coffin of Elizabeth Stuart (1635-50), second daughter of Charles I and Henrietta Maria. One shows the coffin from above and from the side (with section of the vault in which it was placed, and its length indicated); the other is of the inscription on the top: 'Elizabeth 2d. Daughter of ye Late King Charles Deced Sept. 8th. MDCL.'. After the execution of Charles I, Elizabeth and her younger brother Henry went to live in Penshurst in Kent, but after Elizabeth's brother Charles (the future Charles II) landed in Scotland to assume the throne, parliament resolved to transport Elizabeth and Henry 'out of the limits of the Commonwealth'. They were temporarily lodged in Carisbrooke Castle on the Isle of Wight (despite Elizabeth's protestations that her health made transporting her inadvisable), where she died soon after arriving. She was buried in a small vault near the communion table in St Thomas's Church at Newport.
[Ref: 42310]   £260.00   view all images for this item
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[Tally stick c.1229.]
[Tally stick c.1229.] Thom Godesire det Toscy de Kant Jud xxx s. red / med ad festu sci mich Anno gre m. cc. vicef nono & med / ad festu sci martin px seqns p cursucur pl Andr de mikelgat. / & Ingeram Tallear.
[G. Vertue?]
[British, R. Rawlinson, c.1750s.]
Engraved facsimile of the Latin tally of one Thomas Godsire; transcription below, large margins. 105 x 175mm, 4½ x 7". Several fold creases (one splitting in lower margin). A little soiled and stained.
Tally sticks served as records or receipts for financial transactions such as the payment of taxes, debts and fines. From the 12th century onward tally sticks were officially employed by the Exchequer of England to collect the King’s taxes. In recording a debt, wooden sticks were often split horizontally into two parts: the lender receiving one part, the stock; and the debtor, the other part, the foil. Sticks dating from 1296 were found in the Chapel of the Pyx, Westminster Abbey in 1808. England abolished the use of tally sticks in 1826. This tally is from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24717]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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[Two medieval tally sticks.]
[Two medieval tally sticks.] Thom Godesire det Toscy de Kant Jud xxx s. red / med ad festu sci mich Anno gre m. cc. vicef nono & med / ad festu sci martin px seqns p cursucur pl Andr de mikelgat. / & Ingeram Tallear (1229). [&] Ego Thomas Brian de Badick debeo d d Lombard. viij Marcas...1232.
[G. Vertue?]
[Under both inscriptions]...Ric: Rawlinson LLD... 1753.
Two engraved facsimiles to a single sheet, of the Latin tallies of Thomas Godsire and Thomas Brian de Badick; with transcriptions below each. Sheet 275 x 155mm, 10¾ x 6". Trimmed within plate. Fold creases, some surface punctures and damage. A little soiled and stained. Trace of pen annotations to verso.
Tally sticks served as records or receipts for financial transactions such as the payment of taxes, debts and fines. From the 12th century onward tally sticks were officially employed by the Exchequer of England to collect the King’s taxes. In recording a debt, wooden sticks were often split horizontally into two parts: the lender receiving one part, the stock; and the debtor, the other part, the foil. Sticks dating from 1296 were found in the Chapel of the Pyx, Westminster Abbey in 1808. England abolished the use of tally sticks in 1826. These are from the collection of Richard Rawlinson (1690 – 1755), a clergyman and antiquarian who bequeathed a huge collection of books and manuscripts to the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In 1716 he was ordained, but as he was a nonjuror and Jacobite, the ceremony was performed by a nonjuring bishop, Jeremy Collier. In 1728 he became a bishop, but seems to have preferred to pass his time in collecting books and manuscripts, pictures and curiosities, rather than in discharging his episcopal functions. At his death Rawlinson left to the Library 5,205 manuscripts bound in volumes that include many rare broadsides and other printed ephemera, his curiosities, and some other property that endowed a professorship of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford. The Rawlinsonian Professor of Anglo-Saxon was first appointed in 1795. He was also a benefactor to St John's College, Oxford.
[Ref: 24718]   £80.00   (£96.00 incl.VAT)
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The Tree of Reformation,
The Tree of Reformation, Representative of the London Reformatory Institution for Adult Male Criminals, G.t Smith Street, Westminster.
Drawn by William Carter, Inmate.
Feb 19th 1853.
Lithograph, scarce. Sheet 530 x 345mm (20¾ x 13½"). A few nicks in edges. Dusty.
An allegorical scene, with the inmates climbing the tree, marked from 'Probation' at ground level, past '1 Month' to '11 Months', 'Emigration' and, finally, 'America'. Some climbers fall, others end on the wrong branch.
[Ref: 45624]   £380.00  
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[A set of original illustrations by Neave Parker for 'Vulpes: an English fox'.]
[A set of original illustrations by Neave Parker for 'Vulpes: an English fox'.]
[Larger images signed 'Neave Parker'; one dated [19]39 by the artist. All are stamped '2 Aug 1939' to verso.]
Twelve (12) pen & ink drawings on scraperboard, cut to various sizes: six c.270 x 180mm, 10½ x 7"; these laid down to chipboard mounts with original tissue guard leaf preserved. One 230 x 195mm (9 x 7¾"); the rest progressively smaller. Pencil (in one case pen) annotations to margins give intended positions in the text - i.e. 'chap 8 page 58'. Larger images also with relevant quotation below. Generally a little bumping and creasing to extremities of smaller sketches. Altogether a fine set.
The book by Harper Cory (real name William Henry Corkill) was one of the 'Animals All' series of children's books, first published in London by T. Nelson & Sons in 1940. A delightful series of graphic adventures in the life of a fox; two images show the hero of the story's encounters with hunting hounds. The final study is lettered 'The End' in pen in thick Gothic script. W. Neave Parker (1910 - 1961) worked as a surveyor for a short while before going on to serve in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, working in the Photographic Unit. After making the acquaintance of Maurice Burton, a scientific associate at the Natural History Museum and also honorary science editor at the Illustrated London News, he began to produce animal illustrations. The first of his drawings of prehistoric animals appeared in the Illustrated London News on 30 September 1950. He became an accomplished scientific illustrator and the National History Museum commissioned him to do a series of picture postcards; the museum retains the 19 original drawings for this series. Parker also illustrated numerous children's books. His drawings are held in the Ulster Museum and he was the subject of an exhibition there entitled, ' The Prehistoric World of Neave Parker' in 1993.
See BL W.P.5331/1.
[Ref: 25298]   £450.00  
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The Standard of Weights and Measures in the Exchequer. Anno 12º. Henri Septimi.
The Standard of Weights and Measures in the Exchequer. Anno 12º. Henri Septimi. From the Original table formerly in the Treasury of the King Exchequer at Westminster, and noew preserved in the M.S. Library of the late Earl of Oxford.
[Engraved by George Vertue?]
Sumptibus Sciet. Antiquariæ Londini 1746.
Engraving. 610 x 460mm, 24 x 18".
Henry VII's Exchequer, or treasury department, created new standards of measurements for merchants in 1497 and subsequently sent standard weights to 43 English shire towns. This broadsheet was copied from a parchment pasted on an oak table formerly in the Treasury of the Kings Exchequer at Westminster, later in the library of the Earl of Oxford, whose collection of manuscripts became the Harleian Collection of the British Library. It gives definitions of the weights and measures, with some illustrations. Much of the original was written in red ink: according to the note top right the engraver has underlined this text. According to an undated price list, this sheet (published by the Society of Antiquaries whose official engraver was George Vertue) originally cost 2s 6d.
BM: 1871,1209.929.
[Ref: 27766]   £320.00  
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