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Fac Simile de la Dernière lettre du General Moreau à Madame Moreau.
Fac Simile de la Dernière lettre du General Moreau à Madame Moreau.
Engraved by I. Girtin, 330, Oxford Street.
Pub.d Sep.t 30. 1813, by Cox, [D'Angilou] 66 Stafford Place, Pimlico.
Engraving. Verso in ink To the Mrs Spurgeon; Sheet: 245 x 190mm (9¾ x 7½"). Trimmed. Two vertical folds.
A rare image by Girtin of a facsimilie of the last letter sent by Jean Victor Marie Moreau (1763-1813) to his wife, Moreau was mortally wounded during the Battle of Dresden in 1813. Moreau had helped with the rise of Napoleon but he was exiled to the USA in 1804, he returned to Europe and joined forces with his old friend Crown Prince Charles John of Sweden and Tsar Alexander I against the French forces. As well as a facsimilie of the letter the print includes a translation in English and a poem glorifying Moreau.
[Ref: 47006]   £170.00   (£204.00 incl.VAT)
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[Broadside against Napoleon]
[Broadside against Napoleon] Second Edition. An Address To those Brave, Gallant, and Loyal Hearts, the Commanders, Officers, Seamen, and Marines, of The British Navy [...]
[c.1803] London: Printed for J. Asperne, (Successor to Mr. Sewell,) at the Bible, Crown, and Constitution, No. 32, Cornhill; by J. Gold, Shoe-Lane; Price One Penny, or 6s. the 100 and 9d. per Dozen.
Letterpress, sheet 375 x 280mm (14¾ x 11").
Broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height, addressing sailors to prepare them for invasion: 'British Seamen! At this important crisis you have arduous duties to perform: you must submit to many privations, and encounter many hardships and dangers [...] every Tar who has a Sweetheart on shore, or a Wife, or a Daughter, or a Sister that is dear to him, must feel how much it is his interest and duty to make every exertion in his power, to defeat the infamous designs of the enemy, and to hold all danger trifling, and all labour cheap, which may conduce to place these tender and valued connections in a state of security'. Reprinted from the 'Naval Chronicle' magazine. The publisher James Asperne (1757-1820) was best-known for publishing the popular 'European Magazine'. A note at the end suggests: 'Noblemen, Magistrates, and Gentlemen, residing near the Coast, would do well by ordering a few Dozen of the above of their Booksellers, and causing them to be stuck up in their respective Vicinities, and distributed amongst the Sailors.'
[Ref: 33284]   £350.00  
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Plain Answers to plain Questions, in a Dialogue between John Bull and Bonaparte, Met Half-Seas over between Dover and Calais.
Plain Answers to plain Questions, in a Dialogue between John Bull and Bonaparte, Met Half-Seas over between Dover and Calais. John Bull. How do you do? / Bonaparte. Pretty well; but hope to be better when I am in London. / John Bull. When do you expect to get there? / Bonaparte. About the end of September; or October at latest. [...]
[c.1803] London: Printed for J. Hatchard, No. 190, Piccadilly [...] Printed by J. Brettell, 54, Great Windmill Street, Hay [...]
Letterpress, sheet 520 x 440mm (20½ x 17¼"). Folds and creases; large area missing lower right.
Large broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height, in the form of a dialogue between Napoleon and John Bull (representing Britain), in which Bull questions Napoleon about his reasons for various conflicts, freedom of the press, religion, and invading Britain. Published by John Hatchard (1768-1849), who founded the Piccadilly bookseller still thriving over two hundred years on.
[Ref: 33291]   £150.00  
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[Broadside against Napoleon]
[Broadside against Napoleon] James Asperne Reprints the following Resolutions of the Inhabitants of the Parish of St. Mary Lambeth, held at the Royal Oak, Vauxhall, July 26th, 1803, Robert Slade, Esq. in the Chair, from a Conviction of their Utility at the present important Critis, and that he may have an Opportunity of dispersing them with his other loyal Papers, which he has already circulated to the amount of nearly 300,000 in Number. [...] Robert Slade, Chairman.
[c.1803] London: Printed for J. Asperne, (Successor to Mr. Sewell,) at the Bible, Crown, and Constitution, No. 32, Cornhill, by T. Maiden, Sherbourn-Lane;1 Price One Penny, or 6s the 100.
Letterpress, sheet 445 x 280mm (17½ x 11"). On laid paper watermarked 1802.
Broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height. The text publishes resolutions made at a meeting of inhabitants of St. Mary Lambeth (the parish stretching along the south of the Thames from Vauxhall to Waterloo), that in the face of possible invasion, all able-bodied residents of the parish must enrol to assist in the defence of their country. The wider application of the broadside was both to serve as an example to other parishes for increasing enrolment, and to defame Napoleon (much of the text consists of allegations of attrocities and tyrannical acts carried out by the consul). A note at the bottom of the sheet suggests 'Noblemen, Magistrates, and Gentlemen, would do well by ordering a few Dozen of the above Tracts of their different Booksellers, and causing them to be stuck up in the respective Villages where they reside, that the Inhabitants may be convinced of the Cruelty of the Corsican Usurper.' The publisher James Asperne (1757-1820) was best-known for publishing the popular 'European Magazine'.
[Ref: 33282]   £250.00  
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[Broadside against Napoleon]
[Broadside against Napoleon] The Duke of Shoreditch, or, Barlow's Ghost. / Countrymen: After my Spirit had rested in peace more than two hundred years, I was, in a manner, called from my grave by a report in circulation, that the French intended to invade the now United Kingdoms of England and Ireland [...]
London: Printed for J. Asperne, Successor to Mr. Sewell, at the Bible, Crown, and Constitution, No. 32, Cornhill, by T. Maiden. [Price 1d. or 6s. the 100.] August 10th, 1803.
Letterpress, with 1802 watermark; sheet 445 x 270mm (17½ x 10½"). Creasing on right.
Broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height. This broadside, essentially a call for increased participation in the volunteer corps, is voiced by the ghost of a Shoreditch shopkeeper, aroused from his peace by rumours of the planned invasion. The ghost is initially confident of the Britons' ability to repel the French, but soon finds that 'the exercise of Arms had been long laid aside, except upon particular emergencies' and fears that the country will be overrun unless military participation is strengthened. Contains references to Finsbury, Clerkenwell and Shoreditch. The publisher James Asperne (1757-1820) was best-known for publishing the popular 'European Magazine'.
[Ref: 33276]   £350.00  
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[Broadside against Napoleon]
[Broadside against Napoleon] Substance of the Speech of Jacob Bosanquet, Esq. At the Royal Exchange, July the 26th, 1803
[1803] Printed for J. Asperne (Successor to Mr. Sewell,) at the Bible, Crown, and Constitution, No. 32, Cornhill; by W. Lane, Leadenhall Street. Price One Penny each, or 6s the 100 / Where may be had, at the same Price, Sheridan's Address to the People. Also a Collection of all the Loyal Papers that have been and will be Published.
Letterpress, sheet 435 x 280mm (17 x 11"). Creasing lower right.
Broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height, taken from a speech by Jacob Bosanquet (1755-1828), who was Chairman of the East India Company in 1803. This speech, made at an assembly of commercial interests, calls for the solidarity of those present with British interests, and to'unite in an unanimous declaration to stand or fall with our Country and our King'. Bosanquet compares Britain with Ancient Rome and Constantinople, and sees the Sack of those cities as examples to be avoided, of how even great cities can fall through inadequate vigilance. A note at the bottom of the sheet suggests 'Noblemen, Magistrates, and Gentlemen, would do well by ordering a few Dozen of the above Tracts of their different Booksellers, and causing them to be stuck up in the respective Villages where they reside, that the Inhabitants may be convinced of the Cruelty of the Corsican Usurper.' The publisher James Asperne (1757-1820) was best-known for publishing the popular 'European Magazine'.
[Ref: 33287]   £250.00  
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[Broadside against Napoleon]
[Broadside against Napoleon] Countrymen! / The City of Syracuse (in Sicily) had maintained a successfull Contest with the Carthaginians; lulled into Security, however, by an advantageous Peace, she had reduced her Fleets and Armies, and the Carthaginians, who still retained their Envy and Hatred of her, seized the Opportunity to renew the War [...]
[c.1803] London: Printed for J. Hatchard, 190, Piccadilly. Price One Shilling per Dozen. [Hales, Printer, Old Boswell Court, London.
Letterpress, sheet 555 x 450mm (21¾ x 17¼"). Folds and creases; paper tone; on laid paper with fleur-de-lys watermark.
Large broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height. It reprints a passage from Act1, Scene 3 of Philip Massinger's play 'The Bondman' (c.1624), a play which concerns the siege of Syracuse by the Carthaginians. The general Timoleon's call to arms is here used to encourage Britons to show similar bravery. The text concludes 'it is needless to mention what followed this animating Debate. A Part of the Enemy fleet was sunk at Sea, those that landed were immediately put to the Sword, and their Commander slain. Published by John Hatchard (1768-1849), who founded the Piccadilly bookseller still thriving over two hundred years on.
[Ref: 33292]   £450.00  
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[Broadside against Napoleon]
[Broadside against Napoleon] Address to the People of Great Britain. By W.J. Denison, Esq.
[1803] Printed for J. Asperne (Successor to Mr. Sewell,) at the Bible, Crown, and Constitution, No. 32, Cornhill; by W. Lane, Leadenhall Street. Price One Penny each, or 6s the 100 / Where may be had, at the same Price, Sheridan's Address to the People. Also a Collection of all the Loyal Papers that have been and will be Published.
Letterpress, sheet 455 x 280mm (18 x 11"). Creasing.
Patriotic poem published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height, by William Joseph Denison (1770-1849), banker and politician, and a founder of the Reform Club. Like several other 'loyal Papers' of the time, it invokes historical precedents such as conflicts with the Romans and Spanish, as well as past and present British military and naval heroes such as Marlborough, Duncan, St. Vincent, and Nelson. A note at the bottom of the sheet suggests 'Noblemen, Magistrates, and Gentlemen, would do well by ordering a few Dozen of the above Tracts of their different Booksellers, and causing them to be stuck up in the respective Villages where they reside, that the Inhabitants may be convinced of the Cruelty of the Corsican Usurper.' The publisher James Asperne (1757-1820) was best-known for publishing the popular 'European Magazine'.
[Ref: 33288]   £250.00  
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A Second Dialogue between Buonaparte and John Bull / Scene---Calais
A Second Dialogue between Buonaparte and John Bull / Scene---Calais Buonaparte. How do you do, Monsieur Anglois? / John. What's that to you? / Buon. Nay, John, don't be angry. / John. Angry! I am angry, and I will be angry [...]
[c.1803] London: Printed for J. Hatchard, No. 190, Piccadilly. Price Sixpence per Dozen. [Hales, Printer, Old Boswell Court, London.
Letterpress with large margins, and 18th century watermark; sheet 530 x 440mm (21 x 17¼"). Folds and creases.
Large broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height, in the form of a dialogue between Napoleon and John Bull (representing Britain). Napoleon is calm and complacent about his achievements, where John Bull angrily disputes these as a sacrifice of 6000 men (the Battle of Lodi); a massacre (the Battle of Alexandria), and poisoning the French army's injured soldiers. The 'scene' is Calais, a common point for channel crossings previously depicted in Hogarth's similarly anti-Gallican 'The Calais Gate'. Published by John Hatchard (1768-1849), who founded the Piccadilly bookseller still thriving over two hundred years on.
[Ref: 33290]   £450.00  
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[Broadside against Napoleon.]
[Broadside against Napoleon.] Englishmen! You have been unjustly charged with Supineness and Despondency. The Enemies of Government and the Admirers of the Corsican Tyrant, have interpreted your silent Confidence, into despair and dismay [...] Timoleon.
London: Printed by J. Brettell, for J. Hatchard, No. 190, Piccadilly.... Price 6d. per Dozen. [n.d., c.1804]
Letterpress, sheet 540 x 440mm (21¼ x 17¼"). Folds
Large broadside published soon after the end of the Peace of Amiens, a call for ''Half a Million of Britons to avenge the Insults they have too long endured from a Love of Peace''. The pseudonym 'Timoleon' is taken from Massinger's play 'The Bondman', in which Timoleon led the defence of Syracuse against the Carthaginians, a popular source for anti-Napoleon broadsides. Published by John Hatchard (1768-1849), who founded the Piccadilly bookshop still on the same premises two hundred years later.
For Hogarth's 'Calais Gate' see ref. 31474; for another use of Massinger in this context see ref. 33292.
[Ref: 33289]   £450.00  
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[Broadside against Napoleon]
[Broadside against Napoleon] The Bishop of Llandaff's Thoughts on the French Invasion, originally addressed to the Clergy of his Diocese.
[c.1803] Printed for J. Asperne, (Successor to Mr. Sewell,) at the Bible, Crown, and Constitution, No. 32, Cornhill, by S Rousseau, Wood Street, Spa Fields; Price One Penny, or 6s the 100 / Where may be had, at the same Price, Sheridan's Address to the People. Also a Collection of all the Loyal Papers that have been and will be Published.
Letterpress, sheet 390 x 255mm (15¼ x 10"). Crease top right.
Broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height, extracted from 'A Charge delivered to the Clergy of the Diocese of Llandaff, in June, 1798, by R. Watson, D.D. F.R.S. Bishop of Llandaff'. Watson's thoughts are addressed to any sympathisers with the French cause: 'I would say to the most violent Democrat in the kingdom,- Suppose the business done: after Seas of Blood have been shed, Millions of Lives lost, Towns plundered, Villages, burned, the Royal Family exterminated, and unutterable calamity has been endured by persons of all ranks:- after all this has been done, what Advantages will you have obtained beyond what you now possess [?]'. A note at the bottom of the sheet suggests 'Noblemen, Magistrates, and Gentlemen, would do well by ordering a few Dozen of the above Tracts of their different Booksellers, and causing them to be stuck up in the respective Villages where they reside, that the Inhabitants may be convinced of the Cruelty of the Corsican Usurper.' The publisher James Asperne (1757-1820) was best-known for publishing the popular 'European Magazine'.
[Ref: 33286]   £220.00  
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[Broadside against Napoleon] No. 2
[Broadside against Napoleon] No. 2 Loyal Songs. / The Briton's Song [&] Song of the Highland Armed Association.
London: Printed for J. Asperne, [Successor to the late Mr. Sewell], at the Bible, Crown, and Constitution, No. 32, Cornhill, by S. Rousseau. Price One Penny, or 6s the 100. August 12, 1803
Letterpress, with 1803 watermark; sheet 385 x 270mm (15¼ x 10½").
Broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height, consisting of two songs adapted to popular tunes, proclaiming British readiness for any invasion. 'The Briton's Song' contrasts Revolutionary France with British rule: 'Our Forefathers bled on the Scaffold and Plain/ T'establish a Government wise, just and pure;/ We'll defend it till Death, and reject with disdain/ One that scarce for a Day or an Hour can endure./ Shall your fam'd Guillotine. In Old England be seen?/ No!- we mean to live happy, while frantic you sing/ Your fam'd 'Ca Ira',/ And Hymn 'Marsellois',/ For the true Briton's Song shall be "God save the King." The 'Song of the Highland Armed Association' is specifically Scottish in its theme and references. A note at the bottom of the sheet suggests 'Noblemen, Magistrates, and Gentlemen, would do well by ordering a few Dozen of the above Tracts of their different Booksellers, and causing them to be stuck up in the respective Villages where they reside, that the Inhabitants may be convinced of the Cruelty of the Corsican Usurper.' The publisher James Asperne (1757-1820) was best-known for publishing the popular 'European Magazine'.
[Ref: 33278]   £250.00  
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[Broadside against Napoleon]
[Broadside against Napoleon] Proclamation, Made to every Man in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, this First Day of August, in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Three, and in the Forty-fourth Year of the Reign of our especially dear Son King George The Third [...]
[1803] London: Printed for J. Asperne, Successor to Mr. Sewell, at the Bible, Crown, and Constitution, No. 32, Cornhill, by J. and E. Hodson. [Price 1d. each, or 6s. the 100] / Where may also had, A Collection of all the Loyal Papers that have been and will be Published.
Letterpress, sheet 310 x 195mm (12¼ x 7¾"). On laid paper watermarked 'C Badd 1799'
Broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height, stating the risk posed by Napoleon, the 'Murder, Rapine, Slavery and Death, in Cruel and horrible Wantonness' he has committed, and the duty of the British to assist in the defence of their country. The publisher James Asperne (1757-1820) was best-known for publishing the popular 'European Magazine'.
[Ref: 33285]   £220.00  
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The Prophecy! or, Bonaparte Killed at Last by his Own Troops!
The Prophecy! or, Bonaparte Killed at Last by his Own Troops! A True Story, just brought from Paris [...] This Story is founded on a Dream of Bonaparte [...] The Dream is here given in Verse. [...]
[1803] Printed for J. Hatchard, 190, Piccadilly. 1d. each; 6d. per dozen; or, 3s. 6d. per 100. [Brettell, Printer]
Letterpress, sheet 425 x 315mm (16¼ x 12½"). Creasing on left.
Broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height. This ballad prophesises Napoleon's death in the wake of an unsuccessful invasion of Britain. As in other broadsides of the period, Napoleon's alleged killing of his own injured soldiers at Jaffa is invoked as evidence of his treachery. In the aftermath, the new rule of France is imagined: 'no more Consuls, Frenchmen shout,/ But King Louis make your Head. / With Moreau, Minister of State,/ Not made Ambition's Fool,/ But choosing a much safer Fate,/ Than over France to rule'. Victor Moreau was forced into exile in the United States by his opposition to Napoleon. The final verses defend Britain's monarchy (with a reference to the revolutionary, Thomas Paine) and the high taxes during the war as a temporary measure necessary to combat Napoleon. Published by John Hatchard (1768-1849), who founded the Piccadilly bookseller still thriving over two hundred years on.
For a contemporary portrait of Moreau, see ref. 28221.
[Ref: 33275]   £350.00  
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[Broadside against Napoleon]
[Broadside against Napoleon] Song, to the Tune of Mother Casey. / The French, tis said,/ Are thieves by trade,/ And well they fill the function;/ For where they go,/ Both friend and foe,/ They rob without compunction [...]
[c.1803.] London: Printed for J. Asperne, (Successor to Mr. Sewell,) at the Bible, Crown, and Constitution, No. 32, Cornhill, by T. Maiden, Sherbourn-Lane;1 Price One Penny, or 6s the 100.
Letterpress, sheet 340 x 210mm (13½ x 8¼").
Songsheet published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height. The song encourages strong British resistance, referencing French actions in Switzerland and Holland and their supposed plans 'to land their troops at Dover'. Napoleon is compared to Robespierre. Napoleon, it says, is praised now as Robespierre once was, but if Napoleon were to be executed, 'With general voice,/ Would France rejoice,/ And set the bells a-ringing'. A note at the bottom of the sheet suggests 'Noblemen, Magistrates, and Gentlemen, would do well by ordering a few Dozen of the above Tracts of their different Booksellers, and causing them to be stuck up in the respective Villages where they reside, that the Inhabitants may be convinced of the Cruelty of the Corsican Usurper.' The publisher James Asperne (1757-1820) was best-known for publishing the popular 'European Magazine'.
[Ref: 33279]   £250.00  
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[Broadside against Napoleon]
[Broadside against Napoleon] Union and Watchfulness, Britain's True and Only Security. / A few words to every British Subject inculcating this very important idea.
[c.1803] London: Printed for J. Asperne, (Successor to Mr. Sewell,) at the Bible, Crown, and Constitution, No. 32, Cornhill, Price One Penny, or Six Shillings per Hundred; and may be had of the Booksellers, at the West-End of the Town, &c. &c. Page, Printer, Black Friars Road.
Letterpress, sheet 385 x 260mm (15¼ x 10¼"). On laid paper watermarked 1801.
Broadside published at the time when fears of an invasion of the British Isles by Napoleon were at their height, imploring all Britons to take up arms to defend the country, if required. 'To suffer or to die in such a cause, is our first duty, and our highest honour'. The publisher James Asperne (1757-1820) was best-known for publishing the popular 'European Magazine'.
[Ref: 33283]   £250.00  
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People of England.
People of England. ... We will save our country - and may every Briton who feels not the insults that have been heaped upon his country, and resents not the bloody threats that are held out against itm become a colonist f france and the ever repining slave of Buonaparte!. Publicola.
London, July 6, 1803. Printed for J.Ginger, No. 169, Piccadilly... D.N.Shury, Printer, Berwick Street, Soho.
Letterpress broadside, paper size 550 x 435mm, 21¾ x 17¾". Stitch holes in left margin; stained at top.
A pro-war broadsheet, published shortly after the demise of the 'Peace of Amiens'.
For the 'postscript' see ref. 10044
[Ref: 27538]   £490.00  
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Publicola's Postscript to the People of England.
Publicola's Postscript to the People of England. ... If you suppose that Buonaparte will not attempt Invasion, you are deceived!
London, July 18, 1803. Printed for J.Ginger, No. 169, Piccadilly; by D.N.Shury, Berwick Street, Soho.
Letterpress broadside, paper size 550 x 435mm, 21¾ x 17¾". Mounted on album paper.
A pro-government broadsheet, published shortly after the demise of the 'Peace of Amiens'. It argues in favour of the continuation of income tax (introduced by Pitt in 1798) to maintain the army in the face of the Napoleonic threat. It is the 'postscript' to another broadside of the same year.
for another Publicola broadsheet see ref. 27538
[Ref: 10044]   £690.00  
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