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[The Iron Steam Yacht 'Alexandria', 416 Tons.Built for H.I.M. the Emperor of Russia, by C J Mare & Co of Blackwall. Designed By Mr. Watermann Junr. &. Fitted With Engines Of 140, Horse Power By Sir John & Mr. George Rennie.]
[The Iron Steam Yacht 'Alexandria', 416 Tons.Built for H.I.M. the Emperor of Russia, by C J Mare & Co of Blackwall. Designed By Mr. Watermann Junr. &. Fitted With Engines Of 140, Horse Power By Sir John & Mr. George Rennie.]
[T.S. Robins Del.t E.T. Dolby Lith. M. & N. Hanhart Imp.t.]
[Published May 14.th 1852 by Messers. Fores, 41, Piccadilly, London.]
Coloured lithograph, proof before all letters. 425 x 573mm (16¾ x 22½").
A view of the steam yacht 'Alexandria', which was built for the Tsar of Russia in England. The boat steams through the water with a pair of small boats with fishermen using a net in the foreground.
See Ref: 8913 for a lettered version.
[Ref: 31205]   £650.00  
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Fores's Marine Sketches  The Iron Steam Yacht 'Alexandria',  416 Tons.
Fores's Marine Sketches The Iron Steam Yacht 'Alexandria', 416 Tons. Built for H.I.M. the Emperor of Russia, by C J Mare & Co of Blackwall. Designed By Mr. Watermann Junr. &. Fitted With Engines Of 140, Horse Power By Sir John & Mr. George Rennie.
T.S. Robins Delt. E.T. Dolby Lith. M. & N. Hanhart Impt.
Published May 14th. 1852 By Messrs. Fores, 41, Piccadilly, London.
Coloured lithograph, image 310 x 450mm. 12¼ x 17¾". Some surface soiling; tear in lower inscription.
A fine view of the Imperial Russian Steam Yacht. Also inscribed below the image with statistical details The ship's length was 195ft. 10in. with a breadth of 21ft. 7in.
[Ref: 8913]   £680.00  
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The British Queen.
The British Queen. As seen from Blackwall Wharf, on Wednesday 10.th July 1839, on her first Voyage to New York.
[n.d. c.1840.]
Zincograph, rare. Sheet 146 x 197mm. 5¾ x 7¾". Stained & creased.
Blackwall Wharf was an early departure point for early steamship services. The SS British Queen was commissioned in 1839 and named in honour of Queen Victoria. After completing nine round trip voyages she was laid up in 1841. She made her maiden voyage to New York on July 11, 1839 and stopped at Portsmouth before entering the Atlantic.
[Ref: 25161]   £75.00   (£90.00 incl.VAT)
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[View of British Steam Vessels under Weigh.]
[View of British Steam Vessels under Weigh.]
[Published by R Ackermann, 101 Strand, [London, 1820]
Coloured aquatint, unlettered. Sheet 369 x 540mm. 14½ x 21¼". Images cut and laid on separate sheet.
A view of British Steam Vessels under Weigh as Designed and Constructed by Barrodall Robert Dodd of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne. The paddle steamer on a pleasure trip in the centre of the image is surrounded by sailing barges, sailing boats and, in the foreground, a rowing boat. An inset shows the interior of the principal cabin of the main vessel; an American vessel to left for comparison purposes.
In the Sciencist & Society Picture Library.
[Ref: 25910]   £360.00  
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The
The "Countess of Ellesmere" and "Weaver" Iron Steam Vessels. Built for the Trustees of the Late Duke of Bridgewater, by John Laird, Esq. Birkenhead. To the Right Hon.ble the Earl of Ellesmere, this print is most respectfully dedicated by His Lordship's most obedient Servant Saml. Walters.
Drawn by Sam.l Walters, Liverpool. T.G. Dutton, Lith.
Published Nov.r 1852 by Sam.l Walters 97 Bold Street Liverpool.
Tinted lithograph, rare. 361 x 515mm. 14¼ x 20¼".
Merchant steamers built by John Laird (1805-1874) the Scottish shipbuilder and key figure in the development of the town of Birkenhead.
In the RMG; Parker: 2004.
[Ref: 27186]   £420.00  
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[White Star Liner].
[White Star Liner].
S.A. Gammick [?].
Etching, 5.7/8" x 8.½".
The White Star Liner docked.
[Ref: 2623]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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The Great Britain Steam Ship.
The Great Britain Steam Ship. 1000 horse power _ Length 322 Feet _ Breadth 50 feet _ Weight of Iron used in the Ship & Engins 1500 Tons. Built at Bristol & Launched 19th July 1843 _ 3500 Tons.
J.T. Wood, 33 Holywell St, Strand London. J. Windsor Card Maker 2 Meredith Street, Clerkenwell.
[n.d., c.1843.]
Steel engraving on porcelain card. Sheet 115 x 150mm (4½ x 6"). Some staining to edges.
A souvenir card for the launching of Isambard Kingdom Brunel's SS Great Britain, at the time the largest ship in the world.
[Ref: 42027]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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The Great Eastern Steam Ship.
The Great Eastern Steam Ship.
Eng.d & Pub.d by Ellis, 51 Jewin St. City, London. [n.d., c.1850].
Engraving. Sheet size: 310 x 395mm (12¼ x 15½").
The 'Great Eastern' steam ship was designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel and built by Scott Russell & Co.Ltd, London (screw engines by James Watt & Co.Ltd, Birmingham), five funnels, six masts, iron construction, paddle and screw propulsion and a speed of 12 knots. Work started on the ship, which at first was going to be called the Leviathan, in 1854. There were many problems in building the ship and in trying to launch it, and the ship, now renamed the Great Eastern, was not finally afloat until January 1858. She was cheered on her way by enormous crowds as she travelled down river towards the sea. The public impact of the launching of the 'Great Eastern' was enormous and the event was widely celebrated in the press. During sea trials on 9th September 1859 the Great Eastern's heaters exploded, killing six firemen and devestating the grand saloon. The explosion would have sunk a lesser ship, but the Great Eastern survived. Brunel's new construction methods, dividing the ship up into compartments with watertight bulkheads, limited the extent of the damage. However, the bad news hastened the death of Brunel, who passed away on 15th September. In 1864, the Great Eastern was sold for a fraction of its cost to a cable laying company. The time that the ship spent laying cables for the new telegraph system was its most successful. It was used to lay the first telegraph cable to America. The Great Eastern was finally broken up in 1888.
[Ref: 33627]   £360.00  
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The great Eastern named: The Leviathan.
The great Eastern named: The Leviathan.
Berlin, F. SALA & Co. Unter d Linden 57 [n.d., c.1860].
Tinted lithograph. Printed area: 260 x 375mm (10¼ x 14¾"). Faint vertical crease.
The 'Great Eastern' steam ship was designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel and built by Scott Russell & Co.Ltd, London (screw engines by James Watt & Co.Ltd, Birmingham), five funnels, six masts, iron construction, paddle and screw propulsion and a speed of 12 knots. Work started on the ship, which at first was going to be called the Leviathan, in 1854. There were many problems in building the ship and in trying to launch it, and the ship, now renamed the Great Eastern, was not finally afloat until January 1858. She was cheered on her way by enormous crowds as she travelled down river towards the sea. The public impact of the launching of the 'Great Eastern' was enormous and the event was widely celebrated in the press. During sea trials on 9th September 1859 the Great Eastern's heaters exploded, killing six firemen and devestating the grand saloon. The explosion would have sunk a lesser ship, but the Great Eastern survived. Brunel's new construction methods, dividing the ship up into compartments with watertight bulkheads, limited the extent of the damage. However, the bad news hastened the death of Brunel, who passed away on 15th September. In 1864, the Great Eastern was sold for a fraction of its cost to a cable laying company. The time that the ship spent laying cables for the new telegraph system was its most successful. It was used to lay the first telegraph cable to America. The Great Eastern was finally broken up in 1888.
[Ref: 33628]   £230.00  
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The Great Eastern Steam Ship.
The Great Eastern Steam Ship. Presented Gratis with "The Guide," March 5, 1859.
E. Landells sc.
"Nassau Steam Press," W.S. Johnson, CO, St. Martin's Lane, W.C.
Wood engraving, sheet approx 620 x 910mm (24½ x 35¾"). Folded.
Large image of the 'Great Eastern' steam ship, by far the largest ship of her time, with decorative border and cartouches showing it in construction and from different angles, published in advance of the ship's maiden voyage. The ship was designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel and built by Scott Russell & Co.Ltd, London (screw engines by James Watt & Co.Ltd, Birmingham), to meet demand for a ship capable of journeying to India and the Far East under steam and without stopping for refueling. Work started on the ship, which at first was going to be called the Leviathan, in 1854. However, due to problems encountered in building the ship and in trying to launch it, the ship (by now renamed the Great Eastern) was not finally afloat until January 1858. She was cheered on her way by enormous crowds as she travelled down river towards the sea. The public impact of the launching of the Great Eastern was enormous and the event was widely celebrated in the press. During sea trials on 9th September 1859 the Great Eastern's heaters exploded, killing six firemen and devestating the grand saloon. The explosion would have sunk a lesser ship, but the Great Eastern survived. Brunel's new construction methods, dividing the ship up into compartments with watertight bulkheads, limited the extent of the damage. Brunel, already mortally sick by this time, passed away on 15th September. In 1864, the Great Eastern was sold for a fraction of its cost to a cable laying company. The time that the ship spent laying cables for the new telegraph system was its most successful. It was used to lay the first telegraph cable to America. The Great Eastern was finally broken up in 1888.
[Ref: 41081]   £220.00  
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De Groote Zaal in het Stoomschip, de Great-Eastern
De Groote Zaal in het Stoomschip, de Great-Eastern
C.C.A. Last Steend v. P. Blommers te 's Hage.
[c.1860]
Rare lithograph with tintstone, sheet 145 x 235mm (5¾ x 9¼"). Surface loss;
Dutch print showing the interior of the 'Great Eastern' steam ship designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel and built by Scott Russell & Co.Ltd, London. After many problems during construction, the ship was not completed until 1858, arousing enormous public interest at the time. During sea trials on 9th September 1859 the Great Eastern's heaters exploded, killing six firemen and devestating the grand saloon. The explosion would have sunk a lesser ship, but the Great Eastern survived. Brunel's new construction methods, dividing the ship up into compartments with watertight bulkheads, limited the extent of the damage. However, the bad news hastened the death of Brunel, who passed away on 15th September. In 1864, the Great Eastern was sold for a fraction of its cost to a cable laying company. The time that the ship spent laying cables for the new telegraph system was its most successful. It was used to lay the first telegraph cable to America. The Great Eastern was finally broken up in 1888.
[Ref: 39843]   £70.00   (£84.00 incl.VAT)
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The Great Western.
The Great Western. Lying at her Moorings at Broad Pill.
I. Walter, Pinxd. Scale of 40 feet to an Inch.
Lithographed & Published by T. Bedford, 44 Broad Quay Bristol. [n.d., c.1840.]
Lithograph, image 170 x 245mm. 6¾ x 9¾". Lightly soiled. Sheet corners missing.
The SS Great Western, launched in 1837, was the first steamship purposely built for the Atlantic crossing. When it completed the crossing on 23 April 1838, it was the fastest ship ever to do so. An attractive lithograph. After Joseph Walter (1783 - 1856), marine painter, who worked in Bristol.
[Ref: 10912]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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The Great Western. Passing Clevedon, on her return from New York.
The Great Western. Passing Clevedon, on her return from New York. Length 236 Feet, Breadth 59 Feet, Tonnage 1320, 2 Engines of 225 Horse Power Each.
Engraved by W. Willis.
Printed by J. Harris 39, Broad St. Sold by all Booksellers.
Zincograph laid on ornamental boarder sheet. Sheet 229 x 274mm. 9 x 10¾".
The SS Great Western of 1838 was purpose built for crossing the Atlantic and the initial unit of the Great Western Steamship Company. She was designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel and was the model for all successful wooden Atlantic paddle-steamers.
In the Bristol City Council Museum [Ma4435].
[Ref: 25163]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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The Hindostan, of 1800 Tons and 520 Horse Power.
The Hindostan, of 1800 Tons and 520 Horse Power. To the Court of Directors of the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, This Print of the Hindostan departing from Southampton on the 24th Sept.r 1842, to open the comprehensive plan of Steam Communication with British India, &c.
Painted by W.J. Huggins, Marine Painter to his Majesty William IV. Engraved by E.Duncan.
London, Published July 1st 1843, by M.r Huggins, 105 Leadenhall Street.
Coloured aquatint, scarce, in a very fine maple frame. 430 x 630mm, 17 x 24¾". Repaired tear in sky trimmed to plate.
SS Hindostan, a side paddle-wheel steamer launched in 1842, covered the P&O route from England to India. She sank in a cyclone in Calcutta in 1864 while employed as a storeship.
[Ref: 17682]   £950.00  
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[HMY Victoria and Albert.]
[HMY Victoria and Albert.] ...Named and Launched by Lady Milford, at H.M. Yard Pembroke Dock the 16th January 1855.
[c.1860.]
Unique, pencil and ink drawing on card, within decorative embossed frame; dimensions and caption in ink mss. Total sheet 210 x 260mm, 8¼ x 10¼".
Attractive amateur sketch of HMY Victoria and Albert, a 360 foot steamer launched 1855, a Royal Yacht of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom until 1900, owned and operated by the Royal Navy. She displaced 2,470 tons, and could make 15 knots on her paddles. There were 240 crew. She was scrapped c.1904.
[Ref: 15286]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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S.S. 'Iolé'. First Ship of the Salvation Navy dedicated to the Service of God, by General Booth, July, 1885.
S.S. 'Iolé'. First Ship of the Salvation Navy dedicated to the Service of God, by General Booth, July, 1885.
Marlborough Gould & Co., 52 Old Bailey, London E.C.
Issued at Head Quarters Trade Department, Salvation Army.
Chromolithograph in contemporary maple frame. Printed area 350 x 470mm.
The first of four ships in the 'Salvation Navy', founded 1880.
[Ref: 6959]   £450.00  
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The Pacific Steam Navigation Company's Royal Mail Steam Ship. John Elder 3,500 Tonneaux, 600 Chevaux. Construit par John Elder & Cie. A Glasgow.
The Pacific Steam Navigation Company's Royal Mail Steam Ship. John Elder 3,500 Tonneaux, 600 Chevaux. Construit par John Elder & Cie. A Glasgow.
Lith. Roques & Goullaud.
[n.d. 1869]
Lithograph 500 x 380mm [sheet size]
'John Elder', 1869 - 3,832 gross tons, length 382ft x beam 41.7ft, one funnel, three masts, clipper bows, iron hull, single screw, speed 12.5 knots, accommodation for 70-1st, 100-2nd and 273-3rd class passengers. Crew of 104. Launched on 29th Aug. 1869 by John Elder & Co., Glasgow and named for her builder, she was owned by Pacific Steam Navigation Co.. She was completed after the death of John Elder and named as a tribute to the changes affected by his compound engines. Liverpool and started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Valparaiso on 13th Dec.1869. In Feb.1872 after four round voyages, she was rebuilt and lengthened to 406.4ft, re-boilered and given a second funnel. In 1877, her third mast was removed and she was placed on the joint PSNCo. - Orient Line Australian service and started her first voyage from Adelaide via Suez to Liverpool on 19th April. On 27th Jan. 1879 she started her first London - Melbourne - Sydney voyage and commenced her last on this route on 27th May 1886 before reverting to the Liverpool - Valparaiso service. On 17th Jan.1892 she was wrecked in fog on Cape Carranza Rocks en route Valparaiso to Talcahuano, Chile with 139 passengers but with no loss of life. Pacific Steam Navigation Company: Formed in London in 1838, the company commenced operations on the West Coast of South America in 1840. In 1852 they were granted the British Government Mail contract to the area. In 1877 a joint P.S.N.Co-Orient Line service to Australia was started and lasted until 1905 when P.S.N.Co sold their Australian route interests to Royal Mail S.P.Co. Utlimately what had been Pacific Steam Navigation Co has disappeared into Furness Withy Shipping. Notes on the Builder…..In 1834 - Mr. Charles Randolph and Mr. R. S. Cunliff started a small millwright's business in Centre Street under the title of Messrs. Randolph & Co. Till the years 1852-3 marine engineering formed no part in the firm's business, but at that time this important addition was made to the millwright and other branches. The occasion of this was the accession to the partnership of Mr. John Elder, son of Mr. David Elder, who managed the engineering works of Robert Napier with consummate skill for many years. John Elder - destined to achieve a name and fame in connection with steam-engine improvements second only to Watt himself - served an apprenticeship of five years under his father in the works of Robert Napier, and was employed successively in the pattern shop, factory, and drawing office. He was then engaged for a year in the pattern-making works of Messrs. Hicks, at Bolton-le-Moor, and afterwards as a draughtsman at the Great Grimsby Docks. In 1848 he returned to the works of Mr. Napier to take charge of the drawing office. Here he enjoyed the rare opportunity of assisting in the engining of some of the Cunard liners - vessels in which the highest skill possible at that time, both in design and execution, was displayed. ohn Elder's accession to the co-partnery of Messrs, Randolph, Elder & Co. took place in September, 1852, and it was not long until his work was seen to be characterised by great originality and thoroughness. Between the years 1853 and 1867 no fewer than fourteen important patents were taken out by him for improvements in engines and boilers, the objects chiefly being economy of fuel and an increase in the power developed. In 1860 the firm commenced to build ships in the yard now occupied by Messrs. Mackie & Thomson, just above Govan horse-ferry, and in 1864 the shipbuilding was removed to Fairfield, where ever since the business has been one of constant expansion. In 1868 Mr. Randolph and Mr. Cunliff retired, Mr. Elder remaining sole partner until his lamented death, which occurred in London on 17th September, 1869. During this year the output of work at Fairfield consisted of fourteen steamers and three sailing vessels, of a total tonnage of 25,235 - this being nearly twice as much as the next highest output for that year of all the Clyde firms.
[Ref: 5079]   £590.00  
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The Auxiliary S.S. 'Kent' 2300 Tons. G. Fairles Gibbs, Commander. Built & Owned by Messrs. Money ~Wigram & Sons, Blackwall.
The Auxiliary S.S. 'Kent' 2300 Tons. G. Fairles Gibbs, Commander. Built & Owned by Messrs. Money ~Wigram & Sons, Blackwall.
T.G. Dutton del & Lith. M.&H. Hanhart imp.
London, Published Sepr. 20th 1876 by W.G.Foster, (son of W. Foster,) late of 178 Billiter St. Marine, Printseller, Publisher & Frame Maker 21 London St. EC.
Coloured Lithograph 460 x 295mm. faint paper toning from old mount.
Auxiliary Steam Screw Ship, built 1876 at Blackwall. In 1879 she was sold to the Marquis de Campo and renamed Barcelona, running between Cadiz and London. In 1885 she was sold to the Pinillos Line, a company formed in 1884 to sail between Barcelona and the West Indies and U.S Gulf ports. In 1888 she was sold to a Marseilles firm and refitted. 1896 saw her beached and broken having caught fire.
Macpherson Collection:p.168.
[Ref: 2205]   £950.00  
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Friedrichshaften et le bateau à vapeur Kronprinz.
Friedrichshaften et le bateau à vapeur Kronprinz.
Gravé par R. Dikenman.
Zurich chez R. Dikenman Peinter, Rindermarkt, 353. [n.d., c.1840.]
Rare aquatint. Sheet 180 x 240mm (7 x 9½").
A view of Friedrichshaften from Lake Constance, with the paddle steamer 'Crown Prince', built by Escher & Wyss of Zürich in 1839. It was decommissioned in 1903 and scrapped the following year.
[Ref: 42069]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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[Lifeboat rescuing a steamer]
[Lifeboat rescuing a steamer] The Sea and Gale had lost none of their force; and until they got well round the North Foreland, the struggle to get back was just as hard as it had been to get there.
[c.1874]
Lithograph printed in colour, sheet 125 x 195mm (5 x 7¾").
Probably an illustration to an edition of 'History of the Lifeboat and its work' by Richard Lewis (1874), a passage from which is quoted below the image.
[Ref: 43616]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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The London Engineer. (Steam Yacht.)
The London Engineer. (Steam Yacht.)
No.44 of R. Ackermann's Repository of Arts &c Pub.d Aug.t 1. 1819.
Hand-coloured aquatint. Sheet: 150 x 240mm (6 x 9½"). Trimmed and laid on album sheet.
The London Engineer began her service in 1818, setting off from Margate, as a packet boat carrying passengers between Margate and London. Ackermann's Repository of Arts was an illustrated, British periodical published from 1809-1829 by Rudolph Ackermann. The formal title of the publication was "Respository of Arts, Literature, Commerce, Manufactures, Fashions, and Politics", and it did cover all of these fields. At the time, it was considered to be of great influence to the English taste in fashion, architecture, and literature.
[Ref: 46310]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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The London Engineer. (Steam Yacht.)
The London Engineer. (Steam Yacht.)
No.44, of R.Ackermann's Repository of Arts &c. Pubd. Augt. 1.1819.
Coloured aquatint with added hand-colour. 146 x 240mm.
The London Engineer began her service in 1818, setting off from Margate, as a packet boat carrying passenger between Margate and London. Ackermann's Repository of Arts was an illustrated, British periodical published from 1809-1829 by Rudolph Ackermann. The formal title of the publication was "Respository of Arts, Literature, Commerce, Manufactures, Fashions, and Politics", and it did cover all of these fields. At the time, it was considered to be of great influence to the English taste in fashion, architecture, and literature.
[Ref: 15041]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
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The London Stream Ship of London & Hull On Fire in the Humber. Off Cleathorps early in the morning of the 20th Decr. 1835.
The London Stream Ship of London & Hull On Fire in the Humber. Off Cleathorps early in the morning of the 20th Decr. 1835.
Sketched at the time by Andrew Smith, Civil Engineer. Drawn on Zinc by A.R.Grieve.
Printed by Chapman & Co., Patentees, 27, Cornhill. [n.d. c.1836.]
Zincograph with original hand colour. Printed area 220 x 300mm. Laid on thick paper. Small crack in right margin.
A burning paddle-steamer against a snow-covered landscape.
[Ref: 5610]   £220.00  
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The Great Western Steamer, In the Hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean, Sept 9th 1846 in the outward passage to America.
The Great Western Steamer, In the Hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean, Sept 9th 1846 in the outward passage to America.
Henry Melling Invenit et Lithog.
Liverpool: Dec 10th 1846 Published by the Artist. Slater St.
Lithograph. Printed area 265 x 445mm. Brittle edges.
The SS Great Western, launched in 1837, was the first steamship purposely built for the Atlantic crossing. When it completed the crossing on 23 April 1838, it was the fastest ship ever to do so.
[Ref: 7336]   £320.00  
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To The Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, this Print of their Iron Screw Steam Ship 'Mooltan', (2520 Tons Edward Cooper Commander) is most respectfully dedicated by their obedient Servant, Wm. Foster.
To The Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, this Print of their Iron Screw Steam Ship 'Mooltan', (2520 Tons Edward Cooper Commander) is most respectfully dedicated by their obedient Servant, Wm. Foster.
T.G. Dutton, Delt. Et Lith.['TGD' printed monogram lower right of plate]. Day & Son Lithers. To The Queen.
London, Published By Wm. Foster, 114, Fenchurch Street [n.d. c.1865].
Coloured lithograph. 705 x 500mm. Crack to paper in title area. 2 repaired tears above, 1 just into printed area.
The Mooltan was registered for P & O on Mar.8th 1861. Designed as P & Os most luxurious vessel to date, she was expensively decorated throughout. Her engines were the company's first compound type and were designed to cut the consumption of coal by half. To assist in maintaining a reliable service speed, she was designed with a narrow beam, but this produced severe rolling in a cross sea and she was never a successful ship. Her maiden voyage started 20th Jul.1861 when she left Southampton for Alexandria and she was later transferred to the Calcutta to Suez route (this was before the opening of the Suez Canal when UK - India passages were covered in two parts).
[Ref: 2211]   £1,250.00  
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Messrs. Money ~Wigram & Sons, Australian Steam Ship. 'Norfolk', 3196 tons, 2500 Horse-Power. J. Pyne O'Callaghan, Commander.
Messrs. Money ~Wigram & Sons, Australian Steam Ship. 'Norfolk', 3196 tons, 2500 Horse-Power. J. Pyne O'Callaghan, Commander.
T.G. Dutton del & Lith. Jophn B.Day Lith. Etc.
London, Published October, 3rd. 1879 John B. Day 5, Blythwood Villas, Crouch Hill N.
Tinted lithograph. 460 x 295mm, 18 x 11½". Two repaired tears in the margins.
Built by R & H. Green, London, she was launched on 21st Jun.1879, used by Money, Wigram & Co on their London - Sydney service. In 1882 Norfolk was purchased by Royal Mail Steam Packet Co and renamed La Plata, making her first Southampton - South America voyage on 9th October.
Macpherson Collection:p.212.
[Ref: 20546]   £1,250.00  
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Osborne.
Osborne.
T.G.Dutton del & lith. John B.Day Lith.
London: Published by John B.Day, Savoy Street, Strand, W.C. [c.1876].
Lithograph. Printed area 205 x 280mm.
A paddle-steamer.
[Ref: 2215]   £320.00  
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The Iron Steam Yacht 'Peterhoff',  416 Tons.
The Iron Steam Yacht 'Peterhoff', 416 Tons. Built for H.I.M. the Emperor of Russia, by C J Mare & Co of Blackwall. Designed By Mr. Watermann Junr. &. Fitted With Engines Of 140 Horse Power By Sir John & Mr. George Rennie.
T.S. Robins Delt. E.T. Dolby Lith. M. & N. Hanhart Impt.
Published Novbr. 21st. 1850. By Messrs. Fores, 41, Piccadilly, London.
Coloured lithograph, image 310 x 450mm. 12¼ x 17¾".
A fine view of the Imperial Russian Steam Yacht. Also inscribed below the image with statistical details The ship's length was 195ft. with a breadth of 21ft. 7in.
[Ref: 8911]   £1,250.00  
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The Union Steam Ship Company's Royal Mail Steamer 'Phoebe' 613 tons. 120 horse power. To H.R. Clark Esq.re Commander, This plate is respectfully dedicated by his obedient servant, Wm Foster.
The Union Steam Ship Company's Royal Mail Steamer 'Phoebe' 613 tons. 120 horse power. To H.R. Clark Esq.re Commander, This plate is respectfully dedicated by his obedient servant, Wm Foster.
T.G.Dutton, del et lith. Day & Son, Lith.rs to the Queen.
London, Published by Wm. Foster, 114 Fenchurch Street.
Tinted lithograph. 300 x 460mm.
Union Line steamer, built by Messrs. Alexander Denny & Bros. in 1851, an iron screw vessel with a tonnage of 585. She was originally built for Preston & Co. who ran her to South America, being purchased by the Union Line in 1857, on the condition that she passed satisfactory trials, which she had no difficulty in doing. In 1861, she was sold to London brokers, who subsequently transferred her to the Union Line of New Zealand, by whom she was employed on the Inter Colonial mail service for many years. Finally she was hulked in 1901 and later broken up.
[Ref: 2219]   £850.00  
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The Iron Screw Steam Ship 'MO?????'. (Powerful) 1000 tons. The Property of the Russian Steam Navigation & Trading Company. Buily by Messrs and w. Leslie & Co, Iron Ship Builders, Hebburn Quay, Gateshead on Tyne.
The Iron Screw Steam Ship 'MO?????'. (Powerful) 1000 tons. The Property of the Russian Steam Navigation & Trading Company. Buily by Messrs and w. Leslie & Co, Iron Ship Builders, Hebburn Quay, Gateshead on Tyne.
T.G. Dutton del & Lith. Day & Son, Lith.rs to the Queen.
London, Published by W.Foster, 114 Fenchurch Street.
Coloured lithograph, printed area 360 x 470mm. Tear through title area into image reinforced.
Built less than two years after the end of the Crimean War.
[Ref: 2216]   £950.00  
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The 'President' Steam Ship.
The 'President' Steam Ship. A paddle steamer; "Extreme length 275 feet, Beam 41 feet, Breadth from outside of Paddle Boxes 72 feet 6 inches. Burthen 2366 Tons, Engines 540 Horse power".
[n.d., c.1840]
Coloured lithograph. 5½ x 7½". Edges trimmed as a scrap.
[American Steam Ship]
[Ref: 390]   £80.00   (£96.00 incl.VAT)
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[Two photographs of The Ripou, paddle steamer.]
[Two photographs of The Ripou, paddle steamer.]
[c.1866.]
Two photographs, each 125 x 190mm (5 x 7½"), with pencil annotations on the album sheet. Annotation altered, with the wrong year entered.
Two photographs of the paddle steamer ''Ripou'' prior to leaving for India in 1866. It had brought Guiseppi Garibaldi to England on his celebratory tour, arriving in Southampton on 3rd April 1863,.
[Ref: 44569]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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The Auxiliary Screw Steam Ship 'Somersetshire'2200 tons. J.S.Atwood Commander. Built by Mess.rs Money Wigram & Sons, Blackwall.
The Auxiliary Screw Steam Ship 'Somersetshire'2200 tons. J.S.Atwood Commander. Built by Mess.rs Money Wigram & Sons, Blackwall.
T.G.Dutton, del.t et lith.
London, Published July 13th 1867 by Wm. Foster, 17, Billiter Street. E.C.
Coloured lithograph. 300 x 460mm.
Iron screw steamer, built by Messrs. Money Wigram & Sons, of Blackwall, for their own service to Australia in 1867, a vessel of 2,342 tons gross, which was regarded as one of the finest steamers of her day. She cost over £70,000 to build, and on trial she managed 10¼ knots which was considered very good at that time. In the early 'eighties, she was sold to J.R. Renner of Liverpool, converted passed into the hands of the Norwegians and was posted missing in summer of 1898.
[Ref: 2220]   £620.00  
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Launch of the Great Britain,
Launch of the Great Britain, at Bristol. On the 19th of July 1843, in the presence of H.R.H. Prince Albert.
Drawn by H. Sims.
Engd. & Pubd. by J. Harris [c.1850].
Rare steel engraving, perhaps an illustration trimmed from a writing paper, sheet 110 x 175mm. 4¼ x 7".
The SS ‘Great Britain’ was the first screw-propelled vessel to cross the Atlantic, as well as being the first iron-built ship to do so. She sailed from Liverpool to New York in 1845, taking 14 days 21 hours to make the crossing. She was completed in Bristol in 1843 for the Great Western Steamship Company to the plans of Isambard Kingdom Brunel. Accommodation was provided for about 360 passengers. The Great Britain was employed in the Australian trade from 1852, and then had her engines removed and was converted into a sailing vessel in 1882. Her seagoing life ended in the Falkland Islands in 1886. In 1970 she was brought back to the dock in which she was built, for preservation.
[Ref: 23457]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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View of the Proposed Steam Navigation Dock at the Mouth of the River Lea.
View of the Proposed Steam Navigation Dock at the Mouth of the River Lea.
Sketch'd by S. Hemming, Engineer.
Printed by W.N. Vear 24 Tabernacle Row [c.1827]
Lithograph, printed area 195 x 265mm (7¾ x 10¼"). Slight marking on right.
Unrealised plan for a steam navigation dock where the river Lea meets the Thames (known as Leamouth). Designed by Samuel Hemming (1800-76), civil engineer whose plans also included a horse-drawn railway from the nearby East India Dock (see ref. 46935).
[Ref: 46937]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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Royal Yacht Victoria and Albert.
Royal Yacht Victoria and Albert.
T.G.Dutton del & lith. John B.Day Lith.
London: Published by John B.Day, Savoy Street, Strand, W.C. [c.1876].
Colour lithograph. Printed area 205 x 280mm.
A paddle-steamer.
[Ref: 2224]   £320.00  
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Her Majesty's Steam Yacht, the
Her Majesty's Steam Yacht, the "Victoria and Albert". To His Royal Highness Prince Albert, This print representing the Royal Yacht entering Plymouth Sound, on the 30th Aug.t 1843, is dedicated with profound respect, by His Royal Highness's very obedient humble servant, Edmund Fry.
N.M. Condy del. L. Haghe lith.
Day & Haghe lith.rs to the Queen / London, Ackermann & Co. Strand. London, Fenchurch Street, _Fry, Plymouth. [c.1850]
Lithograph with hand-colouring, printed area 340 x 405mm (13½ x 16"). Large margins left & right.
HMY Victoria and Albert, which was designed by the naval architect William Symonds, laid down in Pembroke Dock, and launched in 1843. Functioning as a royal yacht of the sovereign (it was the first steam powered royal yacht), she made twenty voyages before she was scrapped in the 1860s. Lithograph after a study by Nicholas Matthews Condy (1818-51), Plymouth-based artist whose place of residence equipped him for providing studies of several detailed prints of yachts and ships.
[Ref: 38966]   £650.00  
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The Loss of the Pennsylvania New York Packet Ship; the Lockwoods Emigrant Ship; the Saint Andrew Packet Ship, and the Victoria from Charleston, near Liverpool during the Hurricane on Monday & Tuesday Jany 7th & 8th 1839.
The Loss of the Pennsylvania New York Packet Ship; the Lockwoods Emigrant Ship; the Saint Andrew Packet Ship, and the Victoria from Charleston, near Liverpool during the Hurricane on Monday & Tuesday Jany 7th & 8th 1839.
Painted by Samuel Walters. Drawn on Stone by T.Fairland.
Liverpool, Published by Henry Lacey, Repository of Arts, 1000, Bold St. & S. Waters, 99, Mill St. _ London Ackermann & Co., New York, Appleton & Co.
Coloured lithograph. 390 x 510mm. Trimmed to image on three sides.
This print is black-lined presumably in memory of the great loss of life. A report from the Liverpool Mercury on Friday the 11th of January stated that the Sunday past had seen strong gusts of wind, but many vessels went to sea as there was nothing to indicate that a huge storm was about to follow the winds…...The losses recorded at sea were damaging. Many ships were battered and wrecked at sea, as well as in the coastal ports. Many ships that were lost and damaged are named in the narrative, as well as giving lists for some of the seamen who were lost or rescued the day after the hurricane. All areas of the country suffered looses at sea, as well as casualties and fatalities in the ports.
[Ref: 6421]   £950.00  
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''All lonely o'er the desert waste she flies, Scourged on by Surges, Storms, and bursting Skies''.
''All lonely o'er the desert waste she flies, Scourged on by Surges, Storms, and bursting Skies''. The Wonder, New South Western Steam Navigation Company's Royal Mail Packet, James Goodridge, Jun.r Commander, When off the Caskets during her passage to the Channel Islands October 21st, 1846. The generous hearted Inhabitants of the Islands have presented Mr Goodridge with a handsome Testimonial for his intrepid and skilful conduct in navigating this fine vessel safely through one of the most violent adverse gales and ranging seas that ever blew or rolled in the channel.
Painted by J.M. Gilbert _ T.G. Dutton lith: Day & Son Lith.rs to the Queen.
London. Published by R.A. Grove, Marine Publisher and Printseller by appointment to the Queen, 1847.
Lithograph, rare. Sheet 350 x 460mm (13¾ x 18"). Very small tear in top right margin.
A view of 'Wonder' in heavy seas in the English Channel en route from Southampton to the Channel Islands, which Captain James Goodridge described as ''the most boisterous transit I have ever made in countless cross Channel passages''. At one point the ship broached but the captain managed to recover and bring 'Wonder' safely into port. For his skill Goodridge was presented with a silver megaphone. An early paddle steamer, 'Wonder' was built by Ditchburn & Mare in 1844 and soon acquired fame for speed and reliability, prompting Queen Victoria to organise a race with the Royal Yacht 'Fairy' (also built by Ditchburn & Mare), which 'Wonder' won easily.
[Ref: 46331]   £420.00  
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