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An Alarming Discovery shewing the fatal effects of using Cosmetics.
An Alarming Discovery shewing the fatal effects of using Cosmetics.
[Monogram of Paul Pry] Esqr Del .
Pub by T. McLean 26 Haymarket where political and other Caricatures are daily Pub_the largest Collection of any House. [n.d. c.1829.]
Hand-coloured etching. 260 x 380mm (10¼ x 15"), watermarked 'J Whatman Turkey Mill 1828'. Edges nicked, loss of margin to plate on left.
A male servant standing with arms raised in alarm at seeing his master on a couch with whiskers dyed pea green. An advertising sheet on floor describes 'Russian Hair Dye' as 'immoveable'.
BM Satires: undescribed.
[Ref: 40600]   £240.00   (£288.00 incl.VAT)
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Archery.
Archery.
Sketched Etched & Published by George Cruikshank. [n.d., c.1835.]
Etching on india laid paper, 190 x 280mm. 7½ x 11".
Eight vignettes, featuring female hairstyles, the largest showing putti in an archery tournament. A satirical print from 'My Sketch Book' 1834 by George Cruikshank (1792 - 1878).
[Ref: 12017]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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The Back-side of a front Row.
The Back-side of a front Row.
RBS. [Richard Sheridan.]
Pub.d by Darly Jan.y 1. 1777.
Engraving. Plate: 350 x 255mm (13¾ x 10"), with large margins. Uncut.
A comic scene showing the backs of a group of people sitting on a low bench, the exaggerated shapes made by their clothes satirise the fashion of the time.
See BM 5435 & 5430
[Ref: 44743]   £350.00  
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La Baronne du Bel-Air Revenant du Palais Royal.
La Baronne du Bel-Air Revenant du Palais Royal.
[French, c.1775.]
Etching with very large margins, 290 x 190mm (11½ x 7½" ) with four lines of text in French underneath. Paper lightly toned, stained, folds in margins.
A woman wearing a bonnet like a scallop shell, taking to a man with a small dog on a lead. 'La Baronne du Bel-Air' was a one-act opera.
Ex Collection of the Hon Christopher Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 31746]   £260.00  
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Sketches of Fashion. Plate 1st. Showing the Difference between Beasts & Babies.
Sketches of Fashion. Plate 1st. Showing the Difference between Beasts & Babies.
[William Heath.]
Pub June 4th 1829 by T. McLean 26 Haymarket sole Publisher of P-Pry original Caricatures.
Very fine hand-coloured etching. 343 x 247mm. 13½ x 9¾". Cut and laid on scrap sheet. Slight stain top left.
A group of dandies dressin to impress.
BM Satires: 15962.
[Ref: 14495]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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The Bosom Friends.
The Bosom Friends.
Published by S.W. Fores May 28th 1786 at his Caracature Ware-House Piccadilly.
Coloured etching, scarce. Sheet 220 x 250mm (8½ x 6"). Trimmed and mounted in album paper, hole repaired.
Three women, each with large, gauze-covered bosoms, inflated 'derrieres' and huge hair. Two carry large muffs.
BM Satire 7112. Ex Collection of the Hon Christopher Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 31743]   £320.00  
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Buckles and Buttons.
Buckles and Buttons. I Am the Thing. Dem-Me.
Pub. by MDarly Feb. 7 1777.
Engraving with very large margins. 350 x 245mm (13¾ x 9¾").
A man with huge metal buttons on his coat and large shoe buckles.
BM Satires: 5432.
[Ref: 31728]   £260.00  
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Front, Side View, And Back Front, of a Modern fine Gentleman.
Front, Side View, And Back Front, of a Modern fine Gentleman.
Design'd by H.W. Bunbury Esq.r
[London Publish'd March 24th 1783 by J.R. Smith N83 opposite the Pantheon Oxford Street]
Stipple, sheet 225 x 260mm (8¾ x 10¼"). Trimmed, losing publication line. Foxing.
Three views of a slim and foppish young man demonstrating the fashion of the day. Caricature by Henry Bunbury, an amateur printmaker who subsequently enjoyed a successful career as a designer for printsellers. 'Prints by Bunbury an his imitators were conspicuously 'polite' and appealed, like novels, 'To the Fashionable World and Polite circles'. Of good family, amply endowed with social skills, a beautiful wife and connections in high society, Bunbury's appeal was not solely aesthetic' and his admirers 'recognized his comic talent, his informed enthusiasm for literature, and his ability to draw a momentary pang with something of the sensitivity with which Sterne could write it' (Tim Clayton).
BM Satires 6342
[Ref: 41552]   £150.00   (£180.00 incl.VAT)
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The Butcher Macaroni
The Butcher Macaroni Watts it you want. Watts it you buy.
Publish'd as the Act directs, Septr.7 1772, by MDarly, 39 Strand.
Etching, 170 x 125mm. 6¾ x 5".
A butcher named Watts sharpens a knife; to right a butcher's block on which is a large calf's head. He is dressed as a man of fashion and wears a macaroni club, ruffled shirt and cravat. From 'Macaronies, Characters, Caricatures &c by MDarly', in an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates. Numbered 'V.4' upper left and '12' upper right.
BM Satires: 5028.
[Ref: 14245]   £190.00   (£228.00 incl.VAT)
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The Camblet Macaroni.
The Camblet Macaroni.
Pub. accord. to Act. Decr. 2. 1772. by MDarly 39 Strand.
Etching, 175 x 125mm. 7 x 5".
Full-face portrait of a young man standing with hands on hips, legs astride. He is not dressed in the macaroni manner, but wears a round cap of camblet, beneath which his own hair appears; he wears a plain coat and neck cloth, with a striped waistcoat. Camblet or Camlet was a rich woven fabric of Asiatic origin believed to have been made of camel's hair or angora wool. From 'Caricatures, Macaronies & Characters, published by MDarly', in an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates. Numbered 'V5' upper left and '3' upper right.
BM Satires: 5040.
[Ref: 14316]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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Chancery Lane Characters!
Chancery Lane Characters! I'm an Hofficer!!! Don't you know me?
H. Heath.
I.B Brookes 9 New Bond St. [London, n.d., c. 1830.]
Hand coloured lithograph, sheet 210 x 170mm. 8¼ x 6¾". A little trimmed; good early colour.
An overdressed cockney couple; a social satire on the pretensions of London 'types'. Presumably from a series of popular caricatures. I.(or J.)B. Brookes (1830 - 1837; fl.) published his own lithographic satires.
BM Satires undescribed.
[Ref: 27933]   £95.00   (£114.00 incl.VAT)
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A Character.
A Character.
Eliz.B. fec.
Pubd. by MDarly at 39 Strand accor to Act May 19th 1772.
Etching, 175 x 120mm. 7 x 4¾".
A man standing in profile to right, apparently caricatured for his old-fashioned dress and straight lank figure. His left hand is outstretched, his right holds a sword of which only the hilt is visible. He wears a wide flat hat and bag-wig. His long narrow coat hangs well below his knees. Beneath the title are ten etched lines of verse mocking this ‘Queer Old Beau’. By Elizabeth Bridgetta Gulston (1749 - 1779), amateur etcher, wife of Joseph Gulston. From 'Macaronies, Characters, Caricatures &c designed by the greatest personages, artists &c', in an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. Numbered faintly 'V.3' upper left and '7' upper right.
BM Satires: 5009.
[Ref: 14226]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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The Chelsea Macaroni.
The Chelsea Macaroni.
Published according to Act, Octr. 10, 1772. by MDarly, 39, Strand.
Etching, 175 x 125mm. 7 x 5".
A man in profile with hat, sword, and walking stick. From 'Caricatures, Macaronies & Characters, published by MDarly', in an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates. Numbered 'V5' upper left and '1' upper right.
BM Satires: 4658.
[Ref: 14290]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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The City Tonsor.
The City Tonsor.
Pubd. accordg. to Act of Parlt July 1st. 1771 by MDarly 39 Strand.
Etching, 150 x 105mm. 6 x 4".
A hairdresser holding a forked stick on which sit three wigs. From '24 Caricatures by several ladies, gentlemen, artists, etc.', in an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates. Numbered 'V.1' upper left and '4' upper right.
BM Satires: 4672.
[Ref: 14156]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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The Clerical Macaroni.
The Clerical Macaroni.
R.St.G.M. pinxt. I.W. sculp.
Pub accorg. to Act by MDarly Strand March 4th 1772.
Etching, 170 x 120mm. 6¾ x 4¾".
A grotesquely caricatured man dressed in the height of fashion (burlesqued); there is nothing clerical about his dress. His right hand holds a large tasselled cane. His wig has enormous rolls of hair. He wears a nosegay, a flowered waistcoat over a protruding stomach, a large cravat, striped breeches, and clocked stockings. After Richard St George Mansergh St George (1750 - 1798). From 'Caricatures, Macaronies & Characters by sundry ladies gentlemen artists &c.', in an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates. Numbered 'V.2' upper left and '14' upper right.
BM Satires: 4997.
[Ref: 14169]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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[Collection of images.]
[Collection of images.]
C.J. Grant Invent. Del & Lith.
London. Pubd by J. Kendrick & 4 Leicester Square & Sold by T. Dewhurst Manchester: T Drake Birmingham: R Thorley Bath: __ MA Organ Bristol: Ross & Nightingale Liverpool: &c &c [n.d. c.1830.]
Lithograph. 192 x 274mm. 7¾ x 10¾".
Social satire of the early 19th century including the Lass of Richmond, gentlemen's fashion for the summer, and an interesting little figure of a man made of 9 small men/tailors.
[Ref: 16072]   £260.00  
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The Covent Garden Macaronies.
The Covent Garden Macaronies.
Pub by MDarly Strand Feby. 24th. 1772 accorg to Act.
Etching, 245 x 175mm. 9¾ x 7".
Two men stand on the pavement outside a doorway under the pediment of which are the royal arms. Beneath them and over the doorway is inscribed, "Lovejoy, Kings arms Tavern’. This appears to be a representation of the entrance to Covent Garden Theatre. The taller of the two men has snatched off the other's wig, and holds it up in his right hand. In his left hand is his sword, broken off below the hilt; his hat is on the ground. Behind and to the right stands a short stout man with bare shaved head, hat in right hand. The taller man is dressed in the prevailing macaroni fashion and has a certain resemblance to George Colman (1732 - 1794), then part-proprietor and manager of Covent Garden Theatre. Numbered '2' upper right. From an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates.
BM Satires: 5057.
[Ref: 14106]   £260.00  
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"Fire." The Horrors of Crinoline & the Destruction on Human Life.
L'Enfant, Imp, 18, Rathbone Pl.
Published the 14th. April. 1859 by, F.W. Farbrother, 5, Milton St. Euston Square, London.
Fine original hand coloured lithograph, sheet 375 x 275mm. 14¾ x 10¾".
A satire on mid 19th century female fashion; a young lady's dress has caught fire in an interior. Her terrier flees the scene with its tail on fire, an anxious servant with a bucket of water appears at a door in the background. Crinoline was originally a stiff fabric with a weft of horse-hair and a wrap of cotton or linen thread. The fabric first appeared around 1830, but by 1850 the word had come to mean a stiffened petticoat or rigid skirt-shaped structure of steel designed to support the skirts of a woman’s dress in the required shape. The crinoline was the subject of much ridicule and satire, particularly in Punch magazine. Dress reformers did not like it either — they seized upon the cage aspect of the crinoline and claimed that it effectively imprisoned women. Given that the crinoline did eventually have a maximum diameter of up to 180 centimetres (six feet), it is easy to imagine difficulties in getting through doors, in and out of carriages, and the general problems of moving in such a large structure. The second problem was the potential impropriety of the crinoline. Its lightness was a curse as well as a blessing, as a gust of wind or a knock could set it swinging and reveal the wearer's legs. Even worse, if a woman tripped or was knocked over, the crinoline would hold her skirts up.
[Ref: 13108]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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Crinoline 1861.
Crinoline 1861. Clearing the Barrier.
London W.H.J. Carter, Printseller, Bookseller, &c. 12, Regent St. Pall Mall. Printed at 22, Southampton St. Strand.
Lithograph, sheet 380 x 285mm. 15 x 11¼". Facsimile mss. publisher's price list to verso, for '...Prints, Illustrative of Crinoline...beautifully coloured'. Tatty extremities, creases through upper corners.
A satire on the mid 19th century fashion for crinolines, from an annual series on that theme by the same publisher. A lady is helped over turnstiles by a gentleman, a bridge, maybe Hammersmith Bridge, in the background. Crinoline was originally a stiff fabric with a weft of horse-hair and a warp of cotton or linen thread. The fabric first appeared around 1830, but by 1850 the word had come to mean a stiffened petticoat or rigid skirt-shaped structure of steel designed to support the skirts of a woman’s dress in the required shape. The crinoline was the subject of much ridicule and satire, particularly in Punch magazine. Dress reformers did not like it either — they seized upon the cage aspect of the crinoline and claimed that it effectively imprisoned women. Given that the crinoline did eventually have a maximum diameter of up to 180 centimetres (six feet), it is easy to imagine difficulties in getting through doors, in and out of carriages, and the general problems of moving in such a large structure. The second problem was the potential impropriety of the crinoline. Its lightness was a curse as well as a blessing, as a gust of wind or a knock could set it swinging and reveal the wearer's legs. Even worse, if a woman tripped or was knocked over, the crinoline would hold her skirts up.
[Ref: 15154]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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It is to be done Tiney; I hope no one is looking, You must bark loud Ty, If you see a Gentleman coming.
It is to be done Tiney; I hope no one is looking, You must bark loud Ty, If you see a Gentleman coming. Crinoline 1862.
London_W.H.J. Carter, Bookseller, Printseller, &c., 12, Regent St. Pall Mall.
Lithograph, sheet 380 x 280mm. 15 x 11".
A satire on the mid 19th century fashion for crinolines, from an annual series on that theme by the same publisher. A gust of wind lifts up the skirt of a young lady, revealing her underwear, to the evident delight of a gentleman on the path behind her. The lady's dog looks disgruntled, tethered to a fence. Crinoline was originally a stiff fabric with a weft of horse-hair and a warp of cotton or linen thread. The fabric first appeared around 1830, but by 1850 the word had come to mean a stiffened petticoat or rigid skirt-shaped structure of steel designed to support the skirts of a woman’s dress in the required shape. The crinoline was the subject of much ridicule and satire, particularly in Punch magazine. Dress reformers did not like it either — they seized upon the cage aspect of the crinoline and claimed that it effectively imprisoned women. Given that the crinoline did eventually have a maximum diameter of up to 180 centimetres (six feet), it is easy to imagine difficulties in getting through doors, in and out of carriages, and the general problems of moving in such a large structure. The second problem was the potential impropriety of the crinoline. Its lightness was a curse as well as a blessing, as a gust of wind or a knock could set it swinging and reveal the wearer's legs. Even worse, if a woman tripped or was knocked over, the crinoline would hold her skirts up.
[Ref: 15153]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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John Bull Running Down Crinoline.
John Bull Running Down Crinoline.
London W.H.J. Carter, Printseller, Bookseller &c. 12, Regent Street Pall Mall.
Lithograph, sheet 380 x 285mm. 15 x 11¼". Tatty extremities, some spotting.
A satire on the mid 19th century fashion for crinolines, from an annual series on that theme by the same publisher. A lady and her toy spaniel (attempt to) run from a charging bull, her parasol falling from her hands. Crinoline was originally a stiff fabric with a weft of horse-hair and a warp of cotton or linen thread. The fabric first appeared around 1830, but by 1850 the word had come to mean a stiffened petticoat or rigid skirt-shaped structure of steel designed to support the skirts of a woman’s dress in the required shape. The crinoline was the subject of much ridicule and satire, particularly in Punch magazine. Dress reformers did not like it either — they seized upon the cage aspect of the crinoline and claimed that it effectively imprisoned women. Given that the crinoline did eventually have a maximum diameter of up to 180 centimetres (six feet), it is easy to imagine difficulties in getting through doors, in and out of carriages, and the general problems of moving in such a large structure. The second problem was the potential impropriety of the crinoline. Its lightness was a curse as well as a blessing, as a gust of wind or a knock could set it swinging and reveal the wearer's legs. Even worse, if a woman tripped or was knocked over, the crinoline would hold her skirts up.
[Ref: 15159]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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The Surprise.
The Surprise. Dear Me Frank who would have thought of you Shewing Up in Crinoline?
Copyright. London, W.H.J. Carter, Printseller, Bookseller &c. 12, Regent Street, Pall Mall.
Hand coloured lithograph, sheet 290 x 325mm. 11½ x 12¾". Facsimile mss. publisher's price list to verso, for '...Prints, Illustrative of Crinoline...beautifully coloured'. Tatty extremities, tear from right.
A satire on the mid 19th century fashion for crinolines, from an annual series on that theme by the same publisher. Here the artist envisages a male equivalent. Crinoline was originally a stiff fabric with a weft of horse-hair and a warp of cotton or linen thread. The fabric first appeared around 1830, but by 1850 the word had come to mean a stiffened petticoat or rigid skirt-shaped structure of steel designed to support the skirts of a woman’s dress in the required shape. The crinoline was the subject of much ridicule and satire, particularly in Punch magazine. Dress reformers did not like it either — they seized upon the cage aspect of the crinoline and claimed that it effectively imprisoned women. Given that the crinoline did eventually have a maximum diameter of up to 180 centimetres (six feet), it is easy to imagine difficulties in getting through doors, in and out of carriages, and the general problems of moving in such a large structure. The second problem was the potential impropriety of the crinoline. Its lightness was a curse as well as a blessing, as a gust of wind or a knock could set it swinging and reveal the wearer's legs. Even worse, if a woman tripped or was knocked over, the crinoline would hold her skirts up.
[Ref: 15160]   £190.00   (£228.00 incl.VAT)
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'Fashion Gains Custom.'
'Fashion Gains Custom.'
London W.H.J. Carter, Printseller, Bookseller &c. 12, Regent Street, Pall Mall.
Lithograph, sheet 380 x 285mm. 15 x 11¼". Facsimile mss. publisher's price list to verso, for '...Prints, Illustrative of Crinoline...beautifully coloured'.
A satire on the mid 19th century fashion for crinolines, from an annual series on that theme by the same publisher. A discussion in a shoe emporium between a fashionable young lady and the female shop assistant reveals a newly instigated policy that male assistants should not serve female customers, 'Since crinoline has been in fashion'. Crinoline was originally a stiff fabric with a weft of horse-hair and a warp of cotton or linen thread. The fabric first appeared around 1830, but by 1850 the word had come to mean a stiffened petticoat or rigid skirt-shaped structure of steel designed to support the skirts of a woman’s dress in the required shape. The crinoline was the subject of much ridicule and satire, particularly in Punch magazine. Dress reformers did not like it either — they seized upon the cage aspect of the crinoline and claimed that it effectively imprisoned women. Given that the crinoline did eventually have a maximum diameter of up to 180 centimetres (six feet), it is easy to imagine difficulties in getting through doors, in and out of carriages, and the general problems of moving in such a large structure. The second problem was the potential impropriety of the crinoline. Its lightness was a curse as well as a blessing, as a gust of wind or a knock could set it swinging and reveal the wearer's legs. Even worse, if a woman tripped or was knocked over, the crinoline would hold her skirts up.
[Ref: 15161]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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Pic Nic
Pic Nic 'Is this not Delightful.'
London, W.H.J. Carter, 12 Regent Street_Pall Mall.
Lithograph, sheet 250 x 370mm. 9¾ x 14½". Sheet trimmed. Tear into image from right.
A satire on the mid 19th century fashion for crinolines, from a large series on that theme by the same publisher. The underwear of the three women enjoying the picnic is exposed by their rigid skirts as they lie on the grass. Crinoline was originally a stiff fabric with a weft of horse-hair and a warp of cotton or linen thread. The fabric first appeared around 1830, but by 1850 the word had come to mean a stiffened petticoat or rigid skirt-shaped structure of steel designed to support the skirts of a woman’s dress in the required shape. The crinoline was the subject of much ridicule and satire, particularly in Punch magazine. Dress reformers did not like it either — they seized upon the cage aspect of the crinoline and claimed that it effectively imprisoned women. Given that the crinoline did eventually have a maximum diameter of up to 180 centimetres (six feet), it is easy to imagine difficulties in getting through doors, in and out of carriages, and the general problems of moving in such a large structure. The second problem was the potential impropriety of the crinoline. Its lightness was a curse as well as a blessing, as a gust of wind or a knock could set it swinging and reveal the wearer's legs. Even worse, if a woman tripped or was knocked over, the crinoline would hold her skirts up.
[Ref: 15165]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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A Custom House Non Pareil on a Journey to Isleworth.
A Custom House Non Pareil on a Journey to Isleworth.
Pub by MDarly 39 - Strand June 3 1774.
Etching with very large margins, 18th century watermarked paper; 245 x 175mm. 9¾ x 7".
A man walking in profile with his cane tucked under his arm; he appears to be holding a coin out in front of him. From an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates.
BM Satires: undescribed.
[Ref: 32474]   £220.00  
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A Dandy.
A Dandy. A lad who goes into the world dick like me, / Should have his neck tied up, you know, there's no doubt of it [...]
C.W. Etched.
Pub.d, 1818 by S W Fores No 50 Piccadilly.
Coloured etching. 335 x 235mm (13¼ x 9¼". Mounted in album paper.
An English dandy in Paris, dressing for the evening. It is Bob Fudge, a character from Thomas Moore's epistolary verse novel 'The Fudge Family in Paris' (1818), a comedic critique of the tourism that flourished after the Napoleonic Wars ended. Various torn pages on floor including "Essay on Man" etc. By Charles Williams (1797 - 1830; active), prolific etcher of satires of his own or others' designs.
BM Satires: 13071.
[Ref: 31730]   £280.00  
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The Female Turf Macaroni. 4.
The Female Turf Macaroni. 4.
Pub.d by M Darly Decem.r 24th 1771 accor.g to Act.
Etching with very large margins. Part 18th century watermark. Platemark: 150 x 105mm (6 x 4¼"). Light creasing.
A whole length figure in profile of a lady in a riding-habit holding a riding-whip in her right hand. Her hair, without powder, is tied up in a club. She wears a cravat and a cap with a plume of feathers. Probably the Duchess of Grafton, the Duke being the Turf Macaroni in this series. Plate 4 from the publication, '24 Caricatures by several ladies, gentlemen, artists, etc. (Vol.1)'. Published by caricaturist, printseller and ornamental engraver Matthew Darly (1720 - 1781).
BM Satires ref: 4989.
[Ref: 34308]   £220.00  
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Hats.
Hats.
Pubd. Accorg. to Act Octr. 1. 1773 by MDarly 39 Strand.
Etching, 18th century watermark, platemark 250 x 350mm (9¾ x 13¾"); large margins on 3 sides.
Twelve caricature heads showing the different types of hat worn by men. A companion print to 'Wigs' (ref. 43828). From an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates.
BM Satires: 5169.
[Ref: 43827]   £290.00  
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Wigs.
Wigs.
Pub.d Accor:g to Act Oct.r 12 1773 by MDarly 39 Strand.
Etching, 18th century watermark; platemark 245 x 345mm (9¾ x 13½") margins on 3 sides, inside plate at top. Cut.
14 caricature heads showing the different types of wig worn by men. A companion print to 'Hats' (ref. 43827). Some are apparently portraits, including Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst (1714 - 1794), Lord Chancellor. From an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates.
BM Satires: 5170.
[Ref: 43828]   £260.00  
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The Little Deans Yard Macaroni.
The Little Deans Yard Macaroni. V.4. 2. Sanguineos oculos volvit, virgamque requirit.
Pub by MDarly Strand July 30th. 1772 accor to Act.
Etching. Plate 172 x 120mm. 6¾ x 4¾". Mount burn, paper toning.
Dr Samuel Smith, Headmaster of Westminster School, seated in a chair. He looks in profile to the right and points with his left hand, the other hangs over the arm of the chair holding a glove. He wears a flat three-cornered hat, a short tightly curled wig, a pair of bands, and a voluminous gown. 'Sanguineos oculos volvit, virgamque requirit' inscribed above title. From 'Macaronies, Characters, Caricatures &c by MDarly', in an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates. Numbered 'V.4' upper left and '2' upper right.
BM Satires: 5021.
[Ref: 21228]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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Diamond Cut Diamond.
Diamond Cut Diamond. Oh Wigsby my boy, did you ever shave a Monkey. [/] No Sir, but if you'll just walk in I'll try.
W. Summers, Del. Cha.s Hunt, Sc.
London, Pub by Harrison Isaacs, Charles St. Soho. [n.d., c.1830.]
Hand coloured aquatint with etching. Sheet size: 235 x 270mm (9¼ x 10½"), watermarked paper, 'J. Whatman. 1830'. Trimmed inside plate and to image at top edge.
A scene outside 'Sharpwig, Hairdresser & Shaver', as an elaborately dressed figure inspects the shop through his monicle. The hairdresser stands in the doorway, holding shaving equipment, laughing, as does the customer inside. An advertising sign outside the shop reads, 'Theatre Royal Covent Garden [...] Barber of Seville [...] The Monkey that has seen the World'. The shop window displays various wigs and, to the left, two chimneys sweeps look on, with one saying, 'My eyes Jem theres a swell cove', the other replies, 'Ah! What a lark it would be to send him up a Gas Pipe'.
Hickman p.139.
[Ref: 36664]   £230.00  
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Docking the Maccaroni__of the Butcher's Revenge.
Docking the Maccaroni__of the Butcher's Revenge. A Spruce Maccaroni who Hair and whose Cloaths, Were the envy of Fops, and the Patterns of Beaus...Now Now cry'd the Butcher the People may stare, At a Skull without Brains, & a Head without Hair.
Printed for & Sold by Carington Bowles, at his Map & Print Warehouse, No.69 in St. Pauls Church Yard, London. 91. Published
Engraving, framed. 521 x 368mm. 20½ x 14½". Some paper damage in the title area.
Satire on fashion, with a butcher cutting off the back of a Macaroni's club.
BM Satires: 4527. ex Blackburn Collection.
[Ref: 17743]   £650.00  
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La Duchess des Plaisirs, allant au Colisé.
La Duchess des Plaisirs, allant au Colisé.
[French, c.1775.]
Etching rare, with very large margins, with four lines of text in French. 290 x 190mm (11½ x 7½"). Paper lightly toned, folds in margins.
An elaborately-dressed couple, with swept-up hair, the man with a lapdog under his arm.
Ex Collection of the Hon Christopher Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 31747]   £320.00  
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L'Eclipse.
L'Eclipse. Dediée aux Astronomes, et aux Philosophes du dixhuitieme Steele par VA.
Etch'd by J. Barlow.
Publish'd as the Act directs, Feb.y 20, 1787, by H. Humphrey No 51, New Bond Street.
Etching with fine hand colour, rare; 18th century watermark. 300 x 215mm (12 x 8½"). Mounted in album paper.
A woman's head, topped with a conical hat trimmed with a monstrous arrangement of feathers, peers over a huge fur muff. Eclipses were in the news in 1787 because there were seven full eclipses of the sun and moon, the maximum number possible, which usually happens once every 130 years. A note on the British Museum's example of this print (from the Banks Collection) ascribes it to a Miss V. Aynscombe
BM Satires 7248. The three examples in the BM are all uncoloured.
[Ref: 43889]   £480.00  
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The Elected Cobler.
The Elected Cobler.
Publish'd according to Act Augt. 27. 1772 by MDarly, 39 Strand.
Etching, 170 x 125mm. 6¾ x 5".
A man in a long coat standing on a three-legged stool ranting, one foot raised and one arm in the air. From 'Macaronies, Characters, Caricatures &c by MDarly', in an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates. Numbered 'V.4' upper left and '10' upper right.
BM Satires: 4709.
[Ref: 14243]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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An. Election. Ball.
An. Election. Ball.
[Paul Pry] Esq. Del.
London Published by McLean, 26 Haymarket. [n.d., c.1829].
Hand-coloured etching. Sheet size: 245 x 355mm (9¾x 14"). Trimmed.
An interior view in which a well dressed dandy bows and takes the hand of the plain daughter of a grotesquely fat mother, to the shock and confusion of the guests behind. The ballroom can be seen through an open facade in the background. By William Heath (1794/5-1840) ex-Captain of Dragoons, illustrator of colour-plate books, and prolific caricaturist. He published regularly with Thomas McLean.
Not in BM Satires.
[Ref: 32033]   £260.00  
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L'Angloise à Paria.
L'Angloise à Paria.
[n.d., c.1770.]
Engraving. Sheet: 270 x 405mm (10½ x 16"). Trimmed. Small margins, cut to plate at bottom. Some restoration.
A plain looking woman sits trying on wigs in a 'Marchande de Modes' behind a bespectacled woman looks on aghast. French copy of an English print!
[Ref: 44264]   £260.00  
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The Equestrian Macaroni.
The Equestrian Macaroni.
Pubd by MDarly (39) Strand Feby 13 1773.
Etching, 175 x 125mm. 7 x 5".
A man in riding costume in profile, holding a bridle, a crop under his left arm. He wears a small looped club, a low hat, plain coat, striped waistcoat, and spurred riding boots. Racing interest. From 'Characters, Macaronies & Caricatures, by MDarly', in an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates. Numbered 'V.6' upper left and '3' upper right.
BM Satires: 5150.
[Ref: 14493]   £170.00   (£204.00 incl.VAT)
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Nothing extenuate nor aught set down in malice ~
Nothing extenuate nor aught set down in malice ~
[Henry Heath.]
[Pub 28th Aug 1827 by H Fores Panton St Haymarket.]
Hand-coloured etching. Sheet: 350 x 240mm (13¾ x 9½"). Trimmed and tipped into album sheet.
A portrait of a woman in a monstrous hat decorated with ribbon and a voluminous dress. The title is a quotation from Othello, Act V, Scene 2.
[Ref: 46643]   £200.00  
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Le Retour de Paris
Le Retour de Paris or, the Neice presented to her Relatives by her French Governess.
E.H.L. del 1816. Etched by G. Cruikshank.
Pub.d by H. Humphrey St James's Street January 3rd 1817.
Coloured etching with large margins. Sheet 280 x 380mm (11 x 15"), watermarked 'J. Whatman 1816'. Tear entering printed border at top.
A old-fashioned family look aghast at their loudly-dressed relative: 'Well-aday Aunt! What monstrosities are these!'.
BM Satire 12922.
[Ref: 32694]   £240.00  
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Les Oies du Frére Philippe.
Les Oies du Frére Philippe.
à Paris, Chez Gautier, rue Poupée, No. 7. Depose a la Direction G.le de l'Imp. [n.d., c.1813.]
Coloured etching. 225 x 320mm (9 x 12½"). Creased in centre.
A scene from one of Jean de la Fontaine's fables: Philippe, who, in dedication to God, retired to a mountain cave where his son grew up free from temptation. When, at age twenty, the youth emerged, Philippe truthfully explained to him all that he saw until they came to a party of young women. 'What is that?' asked the youth. 'A party of geese', his father replied. 'Father, I beg you, let us take one with us.'
[Ref: 32696]   £150.00  
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A City Taylor's Wife dressing for the Pantheon.
A City Taylor's Wife dressing for the Pantheon.
Martin Pinx.t. Wilson sculp.
Publish'd 5th Feb.y 1772 by Hen.y Parker at No 82 in Cornhill London.
Mezzotint with very large margins. 350 x 250mm (13¾ x 9¾").
A fashionably dressed woman sitting behind a table is taking a necklace out of a box. She looks with disdain at her enraged husband in old-fashioned clothes and a nightcap, sitting next to her, his fists clenched and despair on his face. The Pantheon assembly rooms in Oxford Street opened the previous month.
Ex Collection of the Hon Christopher Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 31725]   £450.00  
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Fashion and its Development.
Fashion and its Development. Our Fathers. Our Husbands. "Which is the Most Absurd".
T. Guerin. Printed at 22, Southampton S.t. Strand.
London W.H.J. Carter, Printseller, Bookseller &c. 12, Regent S.t. Pall Mall.
Lithograph. Sheet: 280 x 375mm, (11 x 14¾").
A comentary on the changes in fashion. On the left a man wears the tight breeches of an English gentleman from c.1820 while on the right a man is dressed in the voluminous fashions of c.1860. Behind them several faint figures also demonstrate the changes in fashion.
[Ref: 36831]   £160.00  
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Headlands Capes and Promontories
Headlands Capes and Promontories
Publish'd June 1786 by J.s Bretherton.
Etching, platemark 250x 350mm (9¾ x 13¾") very large margins.
Satire on the fashions of the 1780s, which included men's high-collared cut-away coats fastened by two large buttons (a revival of a fashion of 1777). Etching after a design by Catherine Maria Fanshawe (1765-1834), poet, an album of whose etchings and drawings is in the British Museum.
BM Satires 7114.
[Ref: 43922]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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The Feather'd Fair in a Fright.
The Feather'd Fair in a Fright.
From the Original Picture by John Collett, in the possession of Carington Bowles.
Publish'd as the Act directs, 24 June 1779.
Engraving. 520 x 370mm. Trimmed to plate & laid on paper, top left corner reinstated with ink mss., affecting sky only.
Print satirizing servant girls for aping the upper-class fashion for huge powdered wigs. Based on a painting by John Collet commissioned by the publisher Carington Bowles.
see O'Connell, 'The Popular Print in England' p.118
[Ref: 1334]   £320.00  
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A Female Macoroni.
A Female Macoroni.
Pubd. accordg. to Act July 14th 1772 by MDarly 39 Strand.
Etching, 175 x 125mm. 7 x 5".
Actress Sophia Baddeley (née Snow, 1745 - 1786) standing in profile with her hair gathered in a large bag. From 'Macaronies, Characters, Caricatures &c designed by the greatest personages, artists &c', in an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates. Numbered 'V.3' upper left and '24' upper right.
BM Satires: 4700.
[Ref: 14216]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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Bless me what perfect specimens to be sure!!!
Bless me what perfect specimens to be sure!!!
I.B. Brooks, 9 New Bond St. H.Heath.
Printed by H.Lefebre & Kohler, 52 Newman St. [n.d., c.1840.]
Coloured lithograph. 230 x 170mm.
Women gathering around a monkey house.
Not in BM.
[Ref: 3125]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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The Fortunate Macaroni.
The Fortunate Macaroni.
Pubd. accor to Act March 16th. 1772 by MDarly Strand.
Etching, 175 x 120mm. 7 x 4¾".
A well-dressed and apparently successful gambler with a high-crowned hat and cloak leans on an ornately carved table on which are dice, a pack of cards and piles of coins or counters. From 'Caricatures, Macaronies & Characters by sundry ladies gentlemen artists &c.', in an album of caricatures published by Mary Darly dated January 1776. It seems that her husband Matthew made the plates. Numbered 'V.2' upper left and '18' upper right.
BM Satires: 4697.
[Ref: 14167]   £190.00   (£228.00 incl.VAT)
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The French Lady in London
The French Lady in London William, toutou, Perroqué et Romina-gros-bis, d'epouvante se fourreroient dans un trou de souris
[After S.H. Grimm, c.1771]
Engraving, sheet 355 x 260mm (14 x 10¼"). Trimmed to platemark; nick on left; creasing. Time staining.
Satire on continental fashions, with a lady besporting an absurd coiffure interrupting a man reading a 'lecture on heads', causing him to dive out of the way. The various animals in the room are equally perturbed. On the wall is a picture of the peak of Tenerife, drawing a comparison between the mountainous island and the height of the coiffure. Copy in reverse of a print of the same title published by Sarah Sledge in 1771.
BM Satires 4784 (copy)
[Ref: 38891]   £260.00  
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Phenomene vivant.
Phenomene vivant. No.6.
Numo [signed in plate.] Lith. de Bernard, rue de l'Abbaye No.4.
Paris, chez Ledoyen, rue St. Jacques No.21. [n.d., c.1850.]
Hand coloured lithograph, sheet 335 x 275mm. 13¼ x 10¾". Small tears to extremities.
A young French woman walking in the street, a brightly coloured cloak covering her floral dress and a huge muff partially obscuring her face; she is accompanied by a man in top hat and long coat whose face is covered. For a series of caricatures following the activities of a young ballerina/singer or stage prodigy.
[Ref: 19535]   £85.00   (£102.00 incl.VAT)
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