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Billingsgate Market.
Billingsgate Market.
Rowlandson & Pugin del. et sculpt. J. Bluck, Aquat.
London. Pub March 1, 1808 at R. Ackermann’s Repository of Arts 101, Strand.
Hand coloured aquatint with large margins. Platemark: 240 x 285mm (9½ x 11¼").
A general view, from the north, of Billingsgate Quay and market with stalls. In the foreground there is a crowd of streetsellers and larger retailers. In the 19th century, boats delivered fish to this small inlet of the Thames and business was conducted on the quayside. Published in Ackermann's famous work, the 'Microcosm of London', the figures were drawn by the famous caricaturist Thomas Rowlandson and the architecture by Augustus Pugin.
Abbey, Scenery: 212.
[Ref: 46882]   £260.00  
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A Prospect of the Inside of Westminster Hall, Shewing how the King and Queen, with the Nobility and Others, did Sit at Dinner on the day of the Coronation, 23 Apr. 1685.
A Prospect of the Inside of Westminster Hall, Shewing how the King and Queen, with the Nobility and Others, did Sit at Dinner on the day of the Coronation, 23 Apr. 1685. With the manner of Serving up the First Course of Hot Meat to their Majesties Table.
S. Moore fecit.
[n.d. c.1690.]
Rare engraving. 394 x 513mm. 15½" x 20¼". Folded and restored.
[Ref: 8474]   £380.00  
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Looking Over the Dam.
Looking Over the Dam.
Phillip Brannan del._ R. Carrick lith. Day & Son lith.rs to the Queen.
London, Published June 9th 1851, by Ackermann & Co. 96 Strand, by Appointment to The Queen, H.R.H. Prince Albert and the Royal Family.
Lithograph with tintstone, printed area 320 x 470mm (12½ x 18½"). Margins bit messy.
The Crystal Palace viewed from under the dam of the Serpentine in the year it was erected to house the Great Exhibition in Hyde Park in 1851. Following the success of the exhibition, the palace was moved and reconstructed in 1854 in a modified and enlarged form in the grounds of the Penge Place estate at Sydenham Hill, south London; this structure was later destroyed by a fire on 30 November 1936. From a set of large lithographs commemorating the Great Exhibition.
[Ref: 43607]   £320.00  
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The Fatal Conflagration of the Custom House, on the Morning of the 12th February, 1814.
The Fatal Conflagration of the Custom House, on the Morning of the 12th February, 1814.
F. Calvert Pinxt.
Pub'd as the Act directs Febr. 25th 1814 by Burkitt & Hudson, 85 Cheapside, London.
Coloured aquatint. 495 x 375mm.
[Ref: 1149]   £650.00  
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An Exact Representation of the Manner of Executing Criminals, on the New Scaffold and Gallows, opposite the New Goal of Newgate in the Old Bailey [...]
An Exact Representation of the Manner of Executing Criminals, on the New Scaffold and Gallows, opposite the New Goal of Newgate in the Old Bailey [...] Accurately Engraved for the New Newgate Calendar [...]
Grainger sculp [c.1770]
Engraving, sheet 130 x 210mm (5 x 8¼"). Foxed.
The execution of prisoners at London's Newgate Prison, at the corner of Newgate Street and Old Bailey.
[Ref: 45468]   £70.00   (£84.00 incl.VAT)
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E. de brandt van London, op den 12. 13. 14. 15. en 16 September Anno 1666.
E. de brandt van London, op den 12. 13. 14. 15. en 16 September Anno 1666.
[n.d., c.1670.]
Engraving. Sheet 100 x 135mm, 4 x 5¼". Trimmed, laid in album paper. A very fine impression.
The Great Fire of London at night, from an elevated viewpoint south of the river.
[Ref: 11832]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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His Majesty George The Forth
His Majesty George The Forth Proclaimed King at the Royal Exchange London. 31st. January 1820.
London Published as the Act directs Jany. 1827. by Sir George Nayler Garter.
Hand coloured aquatint, 345 x 450mm. 13½ x 17¾". Fine.
Scene of proclaimation of George IV's accession to the throne at the Royal Exchange. George IV is seated in a coach with a crowd raising their hats to him as he receives a fanfare from mounted heralds and guards. Published by Sir George Nayler (1764 c. - 1831), Garter King-of arms. As Deputy king-of-arms, he officiated at the coronation of King George IV.
[Ref: 8825]   £320.00  
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Westminster Hall as it Appeared on the Day of the Coronation of his most Gracious Majesty George the Forth.
Westminster Hall as it Appeared on the Day of the Coronation of his most Gracious Majesty George the Forth.
Pubd. as the Act Directs 26 July 1821 by Hodgson & Co 43. King St. Snow Hill & 43 Holywell St. Strand.
Hand-coloured etching, watermarked paper, image 180 x 305mm. 7 x 12". Bit messy.
View inside Westminster Hall, London, showing the coronation banquet for George IV. George was not crowned until 19th July 1821, though his father George III died on 29th January 1820. This piece of popular printing, perhaps an illustration to a broadside or book, was published days later.
[Ref: 24433]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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The Magnificent Iron & Glass Building for the Grand International Exhibition of 1851 in Hyde Park, covers 21 acres is 1848 feet long by 408 feet wide with addition on north side 936 feet long & 48 feet wide_height 66 feet_cubic contents 33.000.000 feet_
The Magnificent Iron & Glass Building for the Grand International Exhibition of 1851 in Hyde Park, covers 21 acres is 1848 feet long by 408 feet wide with addition on north side 936 feet long & 48 feet wide_height 66 feet_cubic contents 33.000.000 feet_ 3230 iron columns for supporting roof_34 miles of gutters_202 miles of sash bars & 900.000 superficial feet of glass_cost £79.800 but if permanently retained £150.000. Dedicated to H.R.H. Prince Albert. Paxton Arch.t
Read & Co. Engraver & Printers, 10. Johnson's Ct. Fleet. London.
[n.d. c.1851.]
A rare engraving. 305 x 400mm. 12 x 15¾". Tears around the edges. Glue staining along the lower edge.
Groups of people arrived at the Crystal Palace for the Great Exhibition, 1851.
[Ref: 18900]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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Scene on the Serpentine, Hyde Park, on the Night of the Grand Jubilee. Augt. 1814.
Scene on the Serpentine, Hyde Park, on the Night of the Grand Jubilee. Augt. 1814.
Published Augt. 24, 1814. by T. Palser, Surry side Westr. Bridge.
Aquatint 250 x 350mm.
In this listing is an etching by J. Gordon that shows the fair established as part of the Peace Celebrations of 1814. This aquatint is a view of a series of naval engagements which were re-enacted in miniature on the Serpentine in Hyde Park during the 1814 Peace Celebrations. It ended with the entire fleet being set alight at the water’s edge, accompanied by a firework display.
[Ref: 4533]   £150.00   (£180.00 incl.VAT)
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The Mob destroying & Setting Fire to the Kings Bench Prison & House of Correction in St. Georges Fields.
The Mob destroying & Setting Fire to the Kings Bench Prison & House of Correction in St. Georges Fields.
Publish'd the 1st of Augst. 1780, by Fielding & Walker, Pater Noster Row.
Engraving, 210 x 330mm. 8¼ x 13". Folding creases, as normal. Closed marginal tear lower right.
The King's Bench Prison was a prison in Southwark, south London, from medieval times until it closed in 1880. It took its name from the King's Bench court of law in which cases of defamation, bankruptcy and other misdemeanours were heard; as such, the prison was often used as a debtor's prison until the 1860s. It was badly damaged in a fire started in the 1780 Gordon Riots, depicted here. One of the rioters carries a banner emblazoned 'no popery', signifying the anti-Catholic underpinnings of the riot. Fold-out plate to a periodical. By Fielding & Walker (probably John Walker, engraver), printers and publishers of the 'Westminster Magazine' and 'European Magazine'.
[Ref: 25017]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[Captain John Eyre's Map and 12 views of the Defences of London During the Civil War.]
[Captain John Eyre's Map and 12 views of the Defences of London During the Civil War.]
[n.d., printed on Whatman paper watermarked 1847.]
15 etchings, each c. 210 x 330mm & map 230 x 290mm. Tear in map
Part of a set of forgeries published by Peter Thompson in 1852 under the pseudonym 'Captain John Eyre' as part of 'Eyre's Fortifications of London, 1643.' Thompson crafted a complete biography and genealogy for Captain John Eyre, making Captain John Eyre the descendent of the real fifteenth century Lord Mayor of London, Simon Eyre, and claiming that fictional Captain John Eyre and the real Wenceslaus Hollar (1607-1677) shared an artistic camaraderie, often sketching together, etc. The group of drawings was exhibited to the Archaeological Association in 1852. This group of drawings consists of sketches from different perspectives of the fortifications erected around London by Parliamentary forces during the Civil War in 1642- 3. Includes a map titled 'Plan of the Fortifications – 1643. Also, The Old Walls Of London'. Also a three-sheet prospect: 'A View of London from the North showing the Fortifications from Whitechapel to Tothill Fields 1642 & 1643'. Then follows 9 more detailed views of specific sections of defences, with numbers corresponding to facsimile annotations above. As the images were actually made by Peter Thompson in the nineteenth century and not by Captain John Eyre in the seventeenth century, the elaborate ramparts depicted in the set of drawings actually bear no resemblance to the hastily constructed earthwork forts built during the Civil War. Beginning in 1853, the public began to question Eyre's existence and Thompson's collection of works by Eyre and Hollar was called into question.
[Ref: 264]   £680.00   view all images for this item
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A Perspective View of the Execution of Lord Ferrers at Tyburn May 5th 1760 for the Murder of his Steward.
A Perspective View of the Execution of Lord Ferrers at Tyburn May 5th 1760 for the Murder of his Steward.
[n.d. c.1760]
Engraving. 225 x 330mm. Trimmed to image on three sides.
Laurence Shirley, fourth Earl Ferrers, 1720-1760. He was tried by his peers in Westminster Hall on 16 April for the deliberate shooting of John Johnson, receiver of rents for the Trustees of the Ferrers estates. Failing to win any mercy from the courts he was commited to the Tower. While there he was frequently visited by his cousin the then famous Selina Hastings Countess of Huntingdon. He is said to be the first to be hanged by the new drop method that replaced hand cart, gibbet and ladder. His body was then dissected at Surgeon's Hall. It is not proven but legend has claimed he was hanged with a silk cord. He was succeeded by his brother who through his distinction was regranted estated forfeited by the Fourth Earl.
[Ref: 265]   £220.00  
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The Lord Mayor &c. taking Water on their return from Westminster Hall.
The Lord Mayor &c. taking Water on their return from Westminster Hall.
[Anon., London, n.d., c.1770s.]
Engraving, rare, sheet 110 x 130mm. 4¼ x 5". Vertical fold, as normal. Lacking margins.
The Lord Mayor of London embarking onto his barge, festooned with the arms of the City of London, beside the River Thames. From a contemporary magazine/periodical.
[Ref: 26819]   £60.00   (£72.00 incl.VAT)
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View of the New London Bridge, from Trafalgar Wharf, Southwark.
View of the New London Bridge, from Trafalgar Wharf, Southwark. As it appeared at the ceremony of Opening for His Majesty William, 4th on the 1.st of August 1831.
R.H. Essex, del.t G. Scharf, lithog.
Published by J. Dickinson, 114, New Bond Street. Printed by C. Hullmandel. [n.d. c.1831.]
Lithograph with large margins. 279 x 380mm (11 x 15").
A view of the opening of James Rennie's New London Bridge by King William IV and Queen Adelaide, 1831, from Trafalgar Wharf, Southwark; looking towards the Monument. In the foreground crowds have gathered to watch the celebrations, a young boy stands on top of a wooden post to gain a better view. Ceremonial barges pass down the River Thames under the bridge which is decorated with flags from different nations; a tent erected across the bridge with flags flying.
Collage: q6889227.
[Ref: 31212]   £260.00  
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The Houses of Lords & Commons as they appeared on Fire Thursday October, 16.th 1834.
The Houses of Lords & Commons as they appeared on Fire Thursday October, 16.th 1834.
[anonymous, n.d. c.1835.]
Hand-coloured mezzotint. 140 x 165mm (5½ x 6½"). Trimmed.
The fire which destroyed the Palace of Westminster, the home of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, on 16 October 1834, in the biggest conflagration to occur in London since the Great Fire of 1666. The fire, which lasted for many hours and attracted large crowds (visible in this print) gutted most of the Palace. Westminster Hall and a few other parts of the old Houses of Parliament survived the blaze and were incorporated into the New Palace of Westminster.
[Ref: 28745]   £80.00   (£96.00 incl.VAT)
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The Houses of Lords & Commons as they appeared On Fire Thursday October 16.th 1834.
The Houses of Lords & Commons as they appeared On Fire Thursday October 16.th 1834.
[n.d. c.1835.]
Finely coloured mezzotint. Plate 152 x 184mm (6 x 7¼"). Cut to platemark.
Burning of Parliament is the popular name for the fire which destroyed the Palace of Westminster, the home of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, on 16 October 1834. The blaze, which started from overheated chimney flues, spread rapidly throughout the medieval complex and developed into the biggest conflagration to occur in London since the Great Fire of 1666, attracting massive crowds. The fire lasted for many hours and gutted most of the Palace, including the converted St Stephen's Chapel (the meeting place of the House of Commons), the Lords Chamber, the Painted Chamber and the official residences of the Speaker and the Clerk of the House of Commons. Westminster Hall and a few other parts of the old Houses of Parliament survived the blaze and were incorporated into the New Palace of Westminster, which was built in the Gothic style over the following decades. J. M. W. Turner witnessed the fire, and painted the subject several times.
See Item 28513 for a coloured example.
[Ref: 32388]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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Her Most Gracious Majesty & Escort Leaving The Palace, St. James's Park.  No.1 - A Series of Birds eye Views taken on the day of Her Majestys Coronation. -  June 28th. 1838.
Her Most Gracious Majesty & Escort Leaving The Palace, St. James's Park. No.1 - A Series of Birds eye Views taken on the day of Her Majestys Coronation. - June 28th. 1838. [&] Hyde Park Fair. No.2 - A Series of Birds eye Views taken on the day of Her Majestys Coronation. - June 28th. 1838.
W. Clerk, lith, 202 High Holborn.
Published by G.S. Tregear, 96, Cheapside, London.
Coloured lithograph, images 240 x 422mm & 271 x 396mm. Tears from edges, one just into image lower left [&] Tear into image at top. Water stain below title.
A pair.
[Ref: 7671]   £650.00   (£780.00 incl.VAT) view all images for this item
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This Print represents the Attempted Assassination of Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen Victoria and H.R.H. Prince Albert,
This Print represents the Attempted Assassination of Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen Victoria and H.R.H. Prince Albert, at Constitution Hill by Edward Oxford, on the Evening of Wednesday June 10th 1840.
Madeley, lith, 5, Wellington St, Strand.
[n.d., c.1840.]
Lithograph, rare. Sheet 260 x 355mm (10¼ x 14").
The scene of the first attempt on Queen Victoria's life, showing the pregnant monarch and her husband travelling on Constitution Hill in a phæton, the Wellington Arch in the background, and Edward Oxford with his pistol raised. After firing two shots he was seized by onlookers. He was charged with treason, but, as no bullets could be found at the scene, it could not be proved his pistols had more than powder in them. He was found 'not guilty by reason of insanity' and sent to Bethlem asylum, where he was a model prisoner for nearly quarter of a century. In 1864 he was transferred to Broadmoor, still a model prisoner, and in 1867 it was decided to release him on the proviso he left the country and never returned. He left for Australia, where he changed his name to John Freeman, married, served as a churchwarden in Melbourne and published a book called Lights and Shadows of Melbourne Life in 1888. He died in 1900.
[Ref: 33868]   £290.00  
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Opening of Waterloo Bridge on the 18.th of June, 1817. as seen from the Corner of Cecil Street, in the Strand.
Opening of Waterloo Bridge on the 18.th of June, 1817. as seen from the Corner of Cecil Street, in the Strand.
Drawn by R.R. Reinagle, A.R.A. Engraved by George Cooke.
London, Published Aug.st 1. 1822; by W.B. Cooke 9 Soho Square.
Etching and engraving on india. Plate 152 x 240mm. 6 x 9½". Foxing in the margins.
View of Waterloo Bridge on its opening day, taken from the corner of Cecil Street in the Strand; many boats on the water and crowds lining the river bank and bridge, flags flown on the bridge, St Paul's can be seen in the distance on the left.
Collage: p7508339.
[Ref: 26086]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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Prince William offering his sword to the Dean,
Prince William offering his sword to the Dean, at the Altar, the Knights Standing under their Banners.
J. Highmore del: J. Pine Sculpt.
[n.d., c.1770.]
Etching and engraving, 445 x 610mm. 17¾ x 24". Vertical centrefold as issued. Small chips and tears into image from extremities.
Ceremony of installation of knights of the Order of the Bath inside Westminster Abbey. A young Prince William, Duke of Cumberland (1721 – 1765), a younger son of George II, kneels before the altar. The knights stand in plumed hats in rows at either side under their banners, a huge crowd of spectators beyond the altar. The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is an order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. The name derives from the medieval ceremony for creating a knight, which involved bathing (as a symbol of purification) as one of its elements. Recipients of the Order are now usually senior military officers or senior civil servants. The Order of the Bath is the fourth-most senior of the British Orders of Chivalry, after The Most Noble Order of the Garter, The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, and The Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick. Numbered 'III' upper left, this is a plate to 'The procession and ceremonies observed at the time of the Installation of the Knights Companion of the Order of the Bath', London; J. Pine, first published 1730. John Pine (1690 - 1756), engraver, publisher, print and mapseller, was Bluemantle pursuivant at the College of Arms and engraver to the king's signet and stamp office. Very scarce.
[Ref: 9099]   £360.00  
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Einzug Wilhemi Henrici Prinzen von Orange zukunfftigen königs in England etc. in Londen.
Einzug Wilhemi Henrici Prinzen von Orange zukunfftigen königs in England etc. in Londen.
[Merians Theatrum Europaeum, 1698.]
Fine etching. Plate 309 x 375mm. 12¼ x 14¾". Vertical fold down the centre. Some small nicks and tears.
The arrival of William of Orange in London; large crowds and cannon fire marks his arrival. London and the Thames can be seen in the background. William III (1650-1702) was a dutch Royal who won English, Scottish and Irish crowns following the Glorious Revolution. He ruled jointly with his wife, Mary II, and were always referred to during their joint reign as "William and Mary". A rare image.
See BM: 1912,1025.1.
[Ref: 17545]   £330.00  
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