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Addams, Transported in the Year, 1763.
Addams, Transported in the Year, 1763.
[n.d. c.1770.]
Engraving. 196 x 127mm (7½ x 5"). Slight creasing.
Portrait of Addams (fl.1763), a bearded convict. Transported to the American Plantations.
BM No: 1999-0926.7
[Ref: 29565]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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James Aiten. Alias John the Painter.
James Aiten. Alias John the Painter.
Lond. Mag. March 177[7].
Engraving. Sheet 215 x 120mm (8½ x 4¾"). Trimmed into date on right.
James or John Aitkin (1752-77), a Scot better known as John the Painter, shown in the dock during his trial for arson attacks on British dockyards during the American War of Independence. A painter by trade, his knowledge of chemicals paint solvents enabled him to make crude incendiary devices. After attacking Portsmouth and Bristol Dockyards, causing a general panic of a large band of arsonists, he was captured, tried and hung at Portsmouth on 10th March 1777. The mizzenmast of HMS Arethusa was taken from the ship and erected at the dockyard entrance, so that the reported 20,000 spectators could all get a good view. It was the highest gallows ever to be used in an execution in England.
[Ref: 40942]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
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Old Aldridge of Eddington.
Old Aldridge of Eddington. Twice tried before F. Burton Esq. at Oxford for assaulting a Young Lady of that City.
Publish'd May 7, 1787. by I.F. Bryant, No. 35, Long Acre.
Etching with aquatint, image 132 x 94mm. Trimmed to plate and tipped into album page.
Ex: Collection of The Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 7557]   £170.00   (£204.00 incl.VAT)
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Cap.t William Bedloe
Cap.t William Bedloe Discoverer of the Popish Plott.
[Anon., c.1681]
Engraving, sheet 215 x 145mm (8½ x 5¾"). Trimmed. Glued to album sheet at edges.
William Bedloe (1650-80), informer and adventurer. In the 1670s Bedloe fell into a life of crime in London, spending time in jail for fraud and at one point fleeing for the continent with his brother. There they stole horses and committed fraud, going by different disguises and identities. In Valladolid they met Titus Oates (and stole from him too), but back in England Bedloe came into the public eye following the death of Sir Edmund Berry Godfrey. Godfrey died in mysterious circumstances soon after receiving testimony from Oates about a supposed 'Popish Plot' to assassinate Charles II, and Bedloe claimed he knew how Godfrey had died. Bedloe appeared at a number of trials relating to the plot, giving evidence that led to the deaths of a number of innocent people. An opportunist, Bedloe exploited the hysteria and gullibility surrounding the fabricated plot, earning well from his 'evidence', while his early death meant he was spared the retribution which Oates and others received once the smoke cleared.
[Ref: 42812]   £190.00   (£228.00 incl.VAT)
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John Bellingham.
John Bellingham. Sketched at his Trial, May 15th 1812.
[after George Dance.]
London, Published as the act Directs, May 12th 1812.
A rare crayon-manner etching. 325 x 240mm (12¾ x 9½") very large margins. Uncut
A sketch of John Bellingham (1770-1812), in the dock at the Old Bailey for the murder of Spencer Perceval (1762-1812), the only British prime minister to be assassinated while in office.
Provenance: Edge Hill, Cheshire
[Ref: 46549]   £260.00  
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Miss Blandy at the place of Execution near Oxford attended by the Rev.d Mr Swinton
Miss Blandy at the place of Execution near Oxford attended by the Rev.d Mr Swinton
[Anon., c.1760]
Engraving, sheet 210 x 125mm (8¼ x 5").
Mary Blandy (1718/9-1752), murderer, ascending the ladder to her execution. Blandy was found guilty of murdering her father by poisoning him, after he refused to consent to her marrying Captain William Henry Cranstoun. Cranstoun, who many believed the real villain, fled to France to avoid prosecution.
[Ref: 45471]   £70.00   (£84.00 incl.VAT)
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Mrs Blight.
Mrs Blight.
Drawn on purpose by George Simpson.
[?London. Published April 12th 1806 by Jeffery, Pall Mall.]
Stipple, rare. Sheet 200 x 110mm (8 x 4¼"). Trimmed within plate, losing publisher's inscription.
Portrait taken during a famous murder trial at the Session House, Newington. Richard Patch was accused of shooting Isaac Blight, his former master. Such was the interest in the case that special accomodation was made for two sons of George III to attend, the Dukes of Cumberland and Sussex. Patch was found guilty and was sentenced to death & dissection. A full account of the trial was also published.
For Simpson's portrait of the murderer see 13585.
[Ref: 44302]   £60.00   (£72.00 incl.VAT)
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James Bolland.
James Bolland.
[n.d., c.1772.]
Stipple engraving with etching, 112 x 102mm.
James Bolland (c.1727–1772), sheriff's officer and forger, executed at Tyburn. From a contemporary magazine.
[Ref: 7741]   £40.00   (£48.00 incl.VAT)
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James Bolland,
James Bolland, Executed for Forgery.
[Anon., c.1772]
Engraving, platemark 170 x 110mm (6¾ x 4¼"). Large margins on 3 sides.
James Bolland (c.1727-1772), sheriff's officer and forger. After having committed various crimes in his past, including hiding debtors and illegal seizure of property, Bolland was arrested for forgery in 1771, tried at the Old Bailey, and hanged at Tyburn on 18 March 1772. Engraving published in the 'Tyburn Chronicle'.
For another likeness see ref. 7741.
[Ref: 46571]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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W. Bridle Gaoler of Ilchester.
W. Bridle Gaoler of Ilchester. Removed by Hunt for miscondunt. [in manuscript.]
[George Cruikshank.]
[1821.]
Etching. Sheet: 110 x 170mm (4¼ x 6¾").
A full length portrait of William Bridle, gaoler of Ilchester Bastille, shown within the prison holding leg irons, manacles and a hangman's noose. Radical activist Henry Hunt was imprisioned for his role in a rally in Manchester which came to be known as the Peterloo Masscare, he served his term in Ilchester Prison and whilst there brought a case against the gaoler William Bridle for drunkeness, gambling, neglect of duty, licentiousness towards female prisoners and torture. Bridle was found guilty and removed. This portrait is the frontispeice to 'Investigation at Ilchester Gaol in the county of Somerset into the conduct of William Bridle the Gaoler, before the commissioner appointed by the crown' published in 1821.
[Ref: 41547]   £110.00  
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Jonathan Britain.
Jonathan Britain. What villains set the Portsmouth Yard on Fire...
T. Parkinson ad vivam del. J.R. Smith Fecit.
Publish'd by W.m Humphrey, at the Shell Warehouse, opposite Cecil Court, S.t Martins Lane, Nov.r 20.th 1771.
Mezzotint. Plate: 350 x 250mm (13¾ x 9¾"). Repaired tears, margins messy.
A portrait of the criminal Jonathan Britain who was executed for forgery in 1772. Having commited forgery he wrote several letters claiming responsibilty for a fire in Portsmouth and requested a pardon in return for surrendering himself and his accomplices, this was disregarded and he was arrested for his crimes.
[Ref: 46470]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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Jonathan Britain.
Jonathan Britain. What Villains Set the Portsmouth Yard on Fire? / Twas Jonathan & Co by whose desire? / For due Rewards Ill own, before a Bench, / My Name is Britain, but my Heart is French.
T.Parkinson ad vivum del. J.R.Smith Fecit.
Publish'd by Wm Humphrey, at the Shell Warehouse, opposite Cecil Court, St Martin's Lane, Novr. 20th 1771.
Mezzotint, lettered state, very scarce; 350 x 250mm. 13¾ x 9¾". Creased and rubbed, with scruffy extremities.
Portrait of Jonathan Britain, forger and informer; half-length, three-quarter to left, resting his left elbow on a table and holding a scroll on which can be read the title of the newspaper 'The Whisperer'; in oval frame. Britain confessed when brought to trial in 1771, for forging bills, that he was concerned in setting fire to the Portsmouth docks, naming others of high rank as conspirators, but his statements were not believed. Thomas Parkinson (1744-1789?).
D'Oench 11. Chaloner Smith 24, II. Frankau 46, III.
[Ref: 27211]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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Mrs. Brownrigg.
Mrs. Brownrigg.
J. Chapman sc.
Published Feb. 1801 [?] by James Cundee.
Stipple. Sheet size: 140 x 85mm (5½ x 3¼"). Trimmed inside plate. Slight loss top right.
Elizabeth Brownrigg (1720 – 1767) was an 18th-century English murderer. Her victim, Mary Clifford, was one of her domestic servants. As a result of witness testimony and medical evidence at her trial, Brownrigg was hanged at Tyburn on 13 September 1767. A plate from 'The Criminal Recorder; or, Biographical Sketches of Notorious Public Characters', printed and published by James Cundee, Ivy Lane, London.
[Ref: 38040]   £45.00   (£54.00 incl.VAT)
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Elizabeth Brownrigg, Executed Septr. 14th. 1767. for ye Murder.  of Mary Clifford.
Elizabeth Brownrigg, Executed Septr. 14th. 1767. for ye Murder. of Mary Clifford.
[n.d., c.1770.]
Engraving, image 170 x 112mm. Margin missing above and left.
Elizabeth Brownrigg d. 1767, murderess, was the wife of James Brownrigg, a house painter, who lived at Fleur de Luce Court, Fetter Lane. For some years she practised midwifery, and about 1765 was appointed by the overseers of St. Dunstan's in the West to act as midwife to the poor women of the parish workhouse. She had three apprentices, Mary Mitchell, Mary Jones, and Mary Clifford, all of whom she treated in a most inhuman manner. On 3 Aug. Clifford was found in a dying state, hidden in Brownrigg's premises, and died shortly after. James, the husband, was committed for trial. Elizabeth and her son John fled, but were apprehended on the 16th. Elizabeth was tried at the Old Bailey, before Mr. Justice Hewitt, on 12 Sept. 1767, found guilty, and received sentence. Her husband and son were acquitted. It appears that after practising all sorts of diabolical cruelties upon Clifford, the woman Brownrigg tied her up to a hook fixed in one of the beams in the kitchen, and flogged her no less than five times on 31 July. She was hanged at Tyburn on 14 Sept. 1767. Her skeleton was exposed in a niche at Surgeons' Hall in the Old Bailey, ‘that the heinousness of her cruelty might make the more lasting impression on the minds of the spectators’ (Gent. Mag.). A well-known reference to her crime is made in some verses in the ‘Anti-Jacobin. For the Gentleman's Magazine.
[Ref: 7746]   £45.00   (£54.00 incl.VAT)
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Mrs. Brownrigg.
Mrs. Brownrigg.
[Pub. 1810, by Nuttall, Fisher & Dixon, Liverpool.]
Stipple. Sheet size: 140 x 85mm (5½ x 3¼"). Trimmed inside plate.
Elizabeth Brownrigg (1720 – 1767) was an 18th-century English murderer. Her victim, Mary Clifford, was one of her domestic servants. As a result of witness testimony and medical evidence at her trial, Brownrigg was hanged at Tyburn on 13 September 1767.
[Ref: 38039]   £50.00   (£60.00 incl.VAT)
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M.rs Elizabeth Brownrigg.
M.rs Elizabeth Brownrigg.
Publish'd according to Act of Parliament Sept.r 17. 1767.
Etching and engraving, rare, paper watermarked GR. 254 x 190mm (10 x 7½"). Creasing.
Elizabeth Brownrigg (1720-1767), murderess, was the wife of James Brownrigg, a house painter, who lived at Fleur de Luce Court, Fetter Lane. For some years she practised midwifery, and about 1765 was appointed by the overseers of St. Dunstan's in the West to act as midwife to the poor women of the parish workhouse. She had three apprentices, Mary Mitchell, Mary Jones, and Mary Clifford, all of whom she treated in a most inhumane manner. On 3 Aug. Clifford was found in a dying state, hidden in Brownrigg's premises, and died shortly after. James, the husband, was committed for trial. Elizabeth and her son John fled, but were apprehended on the 16th. Elizabeth was tried at the Old Bailey, before Mr. Justice Hewitt, on 12 Sept. 1767, found guilty, and received sentence. Her husband and son were acquitted. It appears that after practising all sorts of diabolical cruelties upon Clifford, the woman Brownrigg tied her up to a hook fixed in one of the beams in the kitchen, and flogged her no less than five times on 31 July. She was hanged at Tyburn on 14 Sept. 1767. Her skeleton was exposed in a niche at Surgeons' Hall in the Old Bailey, ‘that the heinousness of her cruelty might make the more lasting impression on the minds of the spectators’ (Gent. Mag.). A well-known reference to her crime is made in some verses in the 'Anti-Jacobin'.
[Ref: 30415]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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The Skeleton of Eliz.h Brownrigg, in Surgeon's Hall
The Skeleton of Eliz.h Brownrigg, in Surgeon's Hall
[Anon. c.1770]
Engraving, sheet 210 x 130mm (8¼ x 5").
The skeleton of Elizabeth Brownrigg (1720 – 1767), who was hanged at Tyburn on 13 September 1767 after she was convicted for murdering her servant Mary Clifford. Her skeleton was exposed in a niche at Surgeons' Hall in the Old Bailey, ‘that the heinousness of her cruelty might make the more lasting impression on the minds of the spectators’ (Gent. Mag.).
[Ref: 45469]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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Mrs. Brownrigg in the Cell, Newgate.
Mrs. Brownrigg in the Cell, Newgate.
[n.d., c.1770]
Engraving, sheet 125 x 210mm (5 x 8¼").
Scenes from the life of Elizabeth Brownrigg (1720-67), murderess who was executed after being convicted for the murder of her servant Mary Clifford. It appears that after practising all sorts of diabolical cruelties upon Clifford, Brownrigg tied her up to a hook fixed in one of the beams in the kitchen, and flogged her. She was hanged at Tyburn on 14 Sept. 1767.
[Ref: 45470]   £75.00   (£90.00 incl.VAT)
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Louisa Caldron on the Torture, called Picketting, alias Picton-ing.
Louisa Caldron on the Torture, called Picketting, alias Picton-ing.
[n.d., c.1806.]
Rare etching. Sheet: 210 x 195mm (8¼ x 7¾"). Trimmed, some damage on left edge and a vertical fold.
A scene showing Luisa Calderón, a young mulatto woman, being tortured to force her confession for helping her lover with a burglary in 1801. The image was used to illustrate the torture used against Calderón in the 1806 trial of the British Governor of Trinidad, General Thomas Picton, who authorised the torture. Picketting, a form of military punishment, was the compelling of a suspended suspect to stand on the flat head of a peg for long periods of time. The trial caused much of a stir with the public, not least because Calderón was attractive and prints such as these showed what a young, attractive woman in state of undress, being tortured might look like captured the public's attention.
[Ref: 41578]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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Elizabeth Canning.
Elizabeth Canning.
TW 1754.
Etching with drypoint, small margins, paper watermarked. Plate 184 x 147mm (7¼ x 5¾"). Slight stain on right; glued to backing sheet at top corners.
Elizabeth Canning (1734-1773) in the witness box, portrayed here by Thomas Worlidge, the 'English Rembrandt'. Canning was a London scullerymaid whose alleged kidnapping caused a sensation in 1753. She disappeared for a month before returning to her mother's home. Susannah Wells and Mary Squires, Canning's alleged captors, were tried and found guilty. However, Crisp Gascoyne, trial judge and Lord Mayor of London, was unhappy with the verdict and began his own investigation which led to information proving Squires and her family to be innocent. Several of the prosecution witnesses recanted their earlier testimonies and Canning was tried and found guilty of perjury. She was sentenced to one month's imprisonment and seven years of transportation.
[Ref: 28956]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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Elizabeth Canning.
Elizabeth Canning.
TW [Thomas Worlidge] 1754.
Etching, sheet 190 x 150mm (7½ x 6"). Trimmed on platemark; good impression on laid paper.
Elizabeth Canning (1734-1773) in the witness box, portrayed here by Thomas Worlidge, the 'English Rembrandt'. Canning was a London scullerymaid whose alleged kidnapping caused a sensation in 1753. She disappeared for a month before returning to her mother's home. Susannah Wells and Mary Squires, Canning's alleged captors, were tried and found guilty. However, Crisp Gascoyne, trial judge and Lord Mayor of London, was unhappy with the verdict and began his own investigation which led to information proving Squires and her family to be innocent. Several of the prosecution witnesses recanted their earlier testimonies and Canning was tried and found guilty of perjury. She was sentenced to one month's imprisonment and seven years of transportation. First state before the number '70' added on the right side.
State i/ii; D41; W69; Ex collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 33024]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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Elizabeth Canning.
Elizabeth Canning.
TW [Thomas Worlidge] 1754.
Etching, sheet 190 x 150mm (7½ x 6"). Trimmed on platemark; good impression on laid paper; glued to backing sheet at corners.
Elizabeth Canning (1734-1773) in the witness box, portrayed here by Thomas Worlidge, the 'English Rembrandt'. Canning was a London scullerymaid whose alleged kidnapping caused a sensation in 1753. She disappeared for a month before returning to her mother's home. Susannah Wells and Mary Squires, Canning's alleged captors, were tried and found guilty. However, Crisp Gascoyne, trial judge and Lord Mayor of London, was unhappy with the verdict and began his own investigation which led to information proving Squires and her family to be innocent. Several of the prosecution witnesses recanted their earlier testimonies and Canning was tried and found guilty of perjury. She was sentenced to one month's imprisonment and seven years of transportation. First state before the number '70' added on the right side.
State i/ii; D41; W69; Ex collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 33025]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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Elizabeth Canning.
Elizabeth Canning.
TW [Thomas Worlidge] 1754.
Etching, sheet 190 x 150mm (7½ x 6"). Small margins; good impression on laid paper; soiling at top.
Elizabeth Canning (1734-1773) in the witness box, portrayed here by Thomas Worlidge, the 'English Rembrandt'. Canning was a London scullerymaid whose alleged kidnapping caused a sensation in 1753. She disappeared for a month before returning to her mother's home. Susannah Wells and Mary Squires, Canning's alleged captors, were tried and found guilty. However, Crisp Gascoyne, trial judge and Lord Mayor of London, was unhappy with the verdict and began his own investigation which led to information proving Squires and her family to be innocent. Several of the prosecution witnesses recanted their earlier testimonies and Canning was tried and found guilty of perjury. She was sentenced to one month's imprisonment and seven years of transportation. Second state after the number '70' added (in reverse) on the right side.
State ii/ii; D41; W69; Ex collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 33026]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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Elizabeth Canning.
Elizabeth Canning.
TW [Thomas Worlidge] 1754.
Etching, sheet 190 x 150mm (7½ x 6"). Small margins; tipped into album sheet; worn later impression.
Elizabeth Canning (1734-1773) in the witness box, portrayed here by Thomas Worlidge, the 'English Rembrandt'. Canning was a London scullerymaid whose alleged kidnapping caused a sensation in 1753. She disappeared for a month before returning to her mother's home. Susannah Wells and Mary Squires, Canning's alleged captors, were tried and found guilty. However, Crisp Gascoyne, trial judge and Lord Mayor of London, was unhappy with the verdict and began his own investigation which led to information proving Squires and her family to be innocent. Several of the prosecution witnesses recanted their earlier testimonies and Canning was tried and found guilty of perjury. She was sentenced to one month's imprisonment and seven years of transportation. Second state after the number '70' added (in reverse) on the right side.
State ii/ii; D41; W69; Ex collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 33027]   £90.00   (£108.00 incl.VAT)
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Mr. Bampfylde Moore Carew, King of the Beggars.
Mr. Bampfylde Moore Carew, King of the Beggars.
[n.d. c.1770].
Engraving. Sheet 280 x 215mm. Trimmed inside plate mark.
Bampfylde Moore Carew [1693 - 1759] was a rogue and imposter, who claimed to be King of the Beggars. Little is known about him other than what is in his memoirs 'The Life and Adventures of Bampfylde Moore Carew', first published 1745.
[Ref: 154]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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Bampfylde Moore Carew.
Bampfylde Moore Carew.
For the Lond. Mag.
Publish'd by R. Baldwin Junr: at the Rose in Pater Noster Row 1753.
Engraving, 195 x 120mm.
'King of the Beggars', adventurer (1693 - 1759). Copied from the mezzotint after Phelps. At the age of twelve he was sent to Tiverton school, where for some time he worked hard, but the schoolboys possessed among them a pack of hounds, and one day he, with three companions, followed a deer so far, that the neighbouring farmers came to complain of the damage done. To avoid punishment the youths ran away and joined some gipsies. After a year and a half Carew returned for a time, but soon rejoined the gipsies. His career was a long series of swindling and imposture, very ingeniously carried out, occasionally deceiving people who should have known him well. His restless nature then drove him to embark for Newfoundland, where he stopped but a short time, and on his return he pretended to be the mate of a vessel, and eloped with the daughter of a respectable apothecary of Newcastle-on-Tyne, whom he afterwards married. He continued his course of vagabond roguery for some time, and when Clause Patch, a king, or chief of the gipsies, died, Carew was elected his successor. He was convicted of being an idle vagrant, and sentenced to be transported to Maryland. On his arrival he attempted to escape, was captured, and made to wear a heavy iron collar, escaped again, and fell into the hands of some friendly Indians, who relieved him of his collar. He took an early opportunity of leaving his new friends, and got into Pennsylvania. Here he pretended to be a quaker, and as such made his way to Philadelphia, thence to New York, and afterwards to New London, where he embarked for England. He escaped impressment on board a man-of-war by pricking his hands and face, and rubbing in bay salt and gunpowder, so as to simulate small-pox. After his landing he continued his impostures, found out his wife and daughter, and seems to have wandered into Scotland about 1745, and is said to have accompanied the Pretender to Carlisle and Derby.
BM: pg.337, 4.
[Ref: 7462]   £45.00   (£54.00 incl.VAT)
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Richard Tidd. [&] William Davidson. [&] Thomas Brunt. [&] James Ings. [&]
Richard Tidd. [&] William Davidson. [&] Thomas Brunt. [&] James Ings. [&] Thomas Hiden. [&] Robert Adams. [&] John Monument. [&] Arthur Thistlewood.
[Engraved by Robert Cooper after Abrham Wivell.
[London, Published by Thos. Kelly, 17 Paternoster Row, May 2 1820.]
Eight stipple-engraved portrait scraps. Largest sheet c. 110 x 85mm (4¼ x 3¼"). Trimmed from larger sheets, mounted on album paper, Thistlewood with old ink mss.
Portraits of the Cato Street Conspirators from a book, 'The Cato Street Conspiracy', published the day after. Thistlewood, Davidson, Ings, Tidd and Brunt were executed at Newgate Prison, 1820.
[Ref: 44441]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT) view all images for this item
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William Corder.
William Corder. As he appeared in Bury Gaol a few days previous to his Trial
[C. Hancock, 1828]
Fine aquatint and etching with hand-colouring, sheet 200 x 120mm (8 x 4¾"), on Whatman paper. Trimmed; glued to backing sheet at top corners.
William Corder (1803-28), the Red Barn murderer. Corder, a fraudster and ladies' man, made a rendezvous with his girlfriend Maria Marten at the barn on the pretext of eloping. Instead he killed her, stuffed her body in a sack and buried her. Corder disappeared and wrote home pretending the two were together, but Marten's body was discovered and a hunt for Corder started. He was, arrested, tried, and sentenced to be hung and dissected. The hanging attracted a huge crowd; the dissection was performed before an audience of Cambridge students. A battery was connected to his limbs to demonstrate muscle contraction; Corder's skin was tanned by the surgeon George Creed and used to bind an account of the murder; and his skeleton was put on display in the Hunterian Museum in the Royal College of Surgeons.
O'D 1
[Ref: 39212]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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The Red Barn at Polstead
The Red Barn at Polstead An accurate View of the Interior, showing the hole from which the Body of Maria Marten was taken. A correct View of the Exterior.
W. Panormo del et sculp
London, Published by T. Kelly, Paternoster Row, Aug.t 2. 1828.
Engraving, sheet 210 x 120mm (8¼ x 4¾"). Glued to backing sheet at top corners.
The notorious 'Red Barn' in Polstead, Suffolk, the scene of an infamous murder committed by William Corder in 1827. Corder (1803-28), a fraudster and ladies' man, made a rendezvous with his girlfriend Maria Marten at the barn on the pretext of eloping. Instead he killed her, stuffed her body in a sack and buried her. Corder disappeared and wrote home pretending the two were together, but Marten's body was discovered and a hunt for Corder started. He was, arrested, tried, and sentenced to be hung and dissected. The hanging attracted a huge crowd; the dissection was performed before an audience of Cambridge students. A battery was connected to his limbs to demonstrate muscle contraction; Corder's skin was tanned by the surgeon George Creed and used to bind an account of the murder; and his skeleton was put on display in the Hunterian Museum in the Royal College of Surgeons.
[Ref: 39214]   £90.00   (£108.00 incl.VAT)
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Cunningham's Adventure with the Astrologer.
Cunningham's Adventure with the Astrologer.
Published by G. Smeeton, St. Martin's Church Yard. [n.d. c.
Hand-coloured aquatint. 209 x 128mm. 8¼ x 5. Slightly messy.
Sawney Cunningham murdered his wife's lover and uncle and terrorised the countryside until he was eventually caught and executed at Leith in 1635. Here he is in an astrologer's study, with stuffed animals and animal skeletons suspended from the ceiling, specimen jars on the window ledge and globes and a compass on the desk behind. A copy of William Jett's engraving for Johnson's 'A General and True History of the Lives and Actions of the most Famous Highwaymen, Murderers, Street-Robbers, &c, to which is added A Geniune Account of the Voyages and Plunders of the most Noted Pirates'
See Ref: 15429 & 9527 for earlier uncoloured engraving impressions.
[Ref: 27701]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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Damien der Abscheulichste Mench auf Erden, als Mörder des Königs von Franckreich nach einen Original aus Paris. 1757.
Damien der Abscheulichste Mench auf Erden, als Mörder des Königs von Franckreich nach einen Original aus Paris. 1757.
[n.d., c.1757.]
Engraving. Sheet: 90 x 160mm (3½ x 6¼"). Trimmed and laid on album sheet.
An exaggerated portrait of Robert-Francois Damiens (1715-1757) who was publicly drawn and quatered and then burnt at the stake for the attempted assassination of King Louis XV of France in 1757. Damiens attacked Louis XV at Versailles with a pen-knife, however, due to the short blade and the king's thick winter clothes, he only managed to wound the king rather than kill him.
[Ref: 41540]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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[William Davies.] The Golden Farmer and the Tinker.
[William Davies.] The Golden Farmer and the Tinker.
J. Nicholls delin J. Basire sculp [c.1736]
Engraving, platemark 310 x 200mm (12¼ x 8"). Trimmed.
William Davies (1627-90), a Welsh highwayman holding a man a gunpoint. Aged 64 he was caught and hanged at Salisbury Court (instead of Tyburn, as usual), where he had murdered a butcher, then was hung in chains on Bagshot Heath. Illustration to Captain Charles Johnson's 'General History of the Lives and Adventures of the Most Famous Highwaymen, Murderers, Street-Robbers etc' (1736). The book contains short biographies of both historical and fictitious criminals. It has generally been accepted that Johnson was a pseudonym for another author, although claims that the author was Daniel Defoe have never been proven.
[Ref: 41239]   £85.00   (£102.00 incl.VAT)
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Dr. Dodd.
Dr. Dodd.
Etched by J. Chapman.
Published Jan. 1804 by James Cundee, Ivy Lane.
Stipple. Sheet size: 140 x 85mm (5½ x 3¼"). Trimmed inside plate.
William Dodd (1729 - 1777) was an English Anglican clergyman who was nicknamed the 'Macaroni Parson'. He dabbled in forgery in an effort to clear his debts, was caught, convicted, and despite a public campaign for a Royal pardon became the last person to be hanged at Tyburn for forgery. A plate from 'The Criminal Recorder; or, Biographical Sketches of Notorious Public Characters', printed and published by James Cundee, Ivy Lane, London.
[Ref: 38041]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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Dr. Dodd.
Dr. Dodd.
Published June 1. 1810, by James Cundee, Albion Press, London.
Stipple. Sheet size: 140 x 85mm (5½ x 3¼"). Trimmed inside plate. Some staining.
William Dodd (1729 - 1777) was an English Anglican clergyman who was nicknamed the 'Macaroni Parson'. He dabbled in forgery in an effort to clear his debts, was caught, convicted, and despite a public campaign for a Royal pardon became the last person to be hanged at Tyburn for forgery.
[Ref: 38031]   £50.00   (£60.00 incl.VAT)
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John Donellan Esq.
John Donellan Esq.
Engraved for the Universal Magazine.
Printed for J. Hinton at the Kings Arms in Paternoster Row. [n.d. c.1780].
Engraving. Plate 165 x 108mm (6½ x 4¼").
Captain John Donellan (c.1737-1781) had a distinguished army career in India and married Miss Boughton in June 1777. In 1781 he was tried and executed at Warwick for the murder of his brother-in-law Sir Theodosius Edward Allesley Boughton, Bart.
[Ref: 28735]   £45.00   (£54.00 incl.VAT)
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Duffy & Lloyd.
Duffy & Lloyd.
Jndel [John Nixon.]
Pub by S & E Harding Pall Mall. [n.d. c.1794.]
Stipple with etching. Plate 233 x 152mm. 9¼ x 6".
Duffy & Lloyd, two criminals.
[Ref: 20267]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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Mr. Stephen Dugdale. Discoverer of the horrid Plott.
Mr. Stephen Dugdale. Discoverer of the horrid Plott.
R. White delin. et sculp [1681]
Etching, sheet 230 x 150mm (9 x 6"). Trimmed. Glued to album sheet at edges.
Stephen Dugdale (d.1683), informer. Imprisoned for debt in 1678, Dugdale turned informer, claiming to have knowledge of the 'Popish Plot' to assassinate Charles II. He confirmed the evidence of the plot's chief fabricator Titus Oates, and created a minor sub-plot of his own, based in Staffordshire. At the Popish Plot trials of 1679, however, Dugdale was unpersuasive in his testimony and his respectability ebbed away under bouts of venereal disease and drunkenness. He continued to earn well as an informant until his death, however.
[Ref: 42811]   £190.00   (£228.00 incl.VAT)
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The Scotch Damien.
The Scotch Damien. Will I Revenge? Yes, at such a Rate / That even the Worlds last age shall hear it tremble. / Oh I will take the Villian in his Height; / Yes, in the Height of his Patriotic Pride, / And in the Foam of his warm Zeal for Liberty; and when his most secure, Il' fix this reeking [heart image].
Pub.d as the English Ect of Parliament directs by Mary Darley [acorn] riders Court, 1769.
Etching, sheet 285 x 200mm. Some soiling & chipping of edges.
Alexander Dunn, the second of two Scottish assassins who attempted to kill John Wilkes in 1763, in London in December. (The first was John Forbes, in Paris in August). Wilkes was regarded as an anti-Scot chauvanist.
[Ref: 1565]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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Cap.t Edward England.
Cap.t Edward England.
J. Nicholls delin. I. Basire sculp.
[n.d., c.1736.]
Coloured engraving. Sheet 305 x 200mm (12 x 8"). Trimmed within plate. Repairs.
The pirate Edward England, born Edward Seegar (c.1685–1721). After serving as a privateer during the War of Spanish Succession, he turned pirate, first in Nassau in the Bahamas and then in Madagascar. When his crew mutinied in 1720, England was marooned on Mauritius with three others but managed to build a boat and return to Madagascar, where he died the following year. His flag was the classic 'Jolly Roger', the skull and crossed bones. A plate from 'A general history of the lives and adventures of the most famous highwaymen, murderers, street-robbers, etc, to which is added, a genuine account of the voyages and plunders of the most notorious pyrates'', by 'Captain Charles Johnson'. Although the real author's identity is unknown (although Daniel Defoe and publisher Nathaniel Mist are suspects) it is known that Woodes Rogers (c.1679-1732), the first Royal Governor of the Bahamas and bane of the pirates there, gave considerable help.
[Ref: 41117]   £220.00  
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William Evans Esq.r.
William Evans Esq.r. Sheriff of London and Middlesex 1839-40. Committed to the Custody of the Serjeant at Arms, Tuesday Jan.y 21st 1840. Interior of the Room in which Mr Sheriff Evans was confined.
J. Linnell fe.t 1840. On Stone by Weld Taylor. J. Graf, Printer to her Majesty.
London, Published March 6, by Thomas Boys, XI Golden Square, Regent Street.
Lithograph on india, rare. 550 x 375mm (21½ x 14¾"). Damp stain bottom left.
Portrait of William Evans, a City official caught up in a confrontation concerning Parliamentary Privilege. In 1839 John Joseph Stockdale (publisher and some-time blackmailer famed for being told 'Publish and be damned' by the Duke of Wellington) brought a libel case against Hansard, the printer of House of Commons business records, over a book Stockdale published, 'On Diseases of the Generative System', being branded obscene. Stockdale won, on the grounds that the House of Commons enjoyed no privilege as to publications under its authority circulated beyond Members of Parliament. The Queen's Bench court sent sheriffs William Evans and John Wheelton to Parliament to claim the damages but were imprisoned for Contempt of Parliament. However the situation was diffused by the 'Parliamentary Papers Act 1840' which made Parliamentary Privilege absolute and invalidated Stockdale's case.
[Ref: 44088]   £280.00  
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Elizabeth Fanning,
Elizabeth Fanning, Executed 26.th July 1815, on a charge of Poisoning the Family of Mr. Turner, taken from the Life in Newgate. Her Autograph Elizabeth Fanning.
I. R. Cruikshank fecit.
Publish'd August 1815, by W. Hone, 55 Fleet St.
Aquatint with some etching. Sheet: 115 x 195mm (4½ x 7¾"). Trimmed within plate on right and left edges.
A portrait of Elizabeth Fanning (1793-1815) who was executed for the poisoning of the family of Mr Olibar Turner with arsenic. Mrs Charlotte Turner, the wife of Olibar Turner's son described in her testimony how Fanning had poisoned them with yeast dumplings which had made the entire family violently ill.
[Ref: 41550]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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Robertus Feilding Aulæ Feildingensis in Com: Warwici Armig.
Robertus Feilding Aulæ Feildingensis in Com: Warwici Armig.
P.Lely Eques pinxit. I.V.Vaart fecit.
R.Tompson Excudit. [n.d., c.1670.]
Mezzotint. 330 x 255mm. Trimmed to plate and laid down. Very fine.
'Beau' Feilding, who bigamously married the Dutchess of Cleveland. He was prosecuted, found guilty, but pardoned by Queen Anne.
CS: Vandervaart 2.
[Ref: 12033]   £360.00   (£432.00 incl.VAT)
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The lively Portraicture of Iohn Felton who most Miserably kil'd The right Honoble. George Villeirs [sic] Duke of Buckingham August ye 23 1628.
The lively Portraicture of Iohn Felton who most Miserably kil'd The right Honoble. George Villeirs [sic] Duke of Buckingham August ye 23 1628. Copied by Richd. Sawyer from the extremely rare print (presumed to be unique) in the Sutherland Collection.
Richd. Sawyer fecit 1830.
London Published May 15, 1830 by W.B. Tiffin, 3, Hay market.
Scarce engraving from a limited edition, 230 x 170mm. 9 x 6¾".
John Felton (1595? - 1628), assassin of George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592 - 1628) at Portsmouth; hat in left hand, dagger in right. Annotated to verso in ink by the publisher: 'Only 50 printed W.B.T. (No.46)'. There is an impression in the Bodleian Library.
NPG D20448. DNB.
[Ref: 19195]   £80.00   (£96.00 incl.VAT)
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[Usher? Gahagan].
[Usher? Gahagan].
[n.d. c.1790].
Stipple engraving. Proof before letters. Sheet 335 x 420mm. Light foxing. Paper browned.
Sitter is possibly Usher Gahagan, an Irish classical scholar who fell into bad company in London and was hanged at Tyburn in 1749 for 'diminishing the current coin of the realm'.
[Ref: 208]   £260.00  
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A Correct Likeness of the notorious Jane Gibbs.
A Correct Likeness of the notorious Jane Gibbs. She addresses herself to decent dressed men as a Servant out of Place, or a Quaker, pretends a deal of Modesty, and if she cannot prevail by these means, she then accuses them of having robbed her . . . and with such boldness, that has induced many respectable men to give her sums of money to prevent unpleasant consequences ... [etc.]
Pub. by Fores Piccadilly [in image, n.d., c.1799].
Etching with original hand colour, sheet 270 x 195mm. Trimmed to plate top and sides. Horizontal centre crease.
Caricature portrait of Jane Gibbs, street-walker and extorter.
BM Satires: 9444.
[Ref: 8000]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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Jane Gibbs, the most notorious pest of Society & Street Walker as she appeared at Bow Street on Tuesd.y Oct.r 8.th.
Jane Gibbs, the most notorious pest of Society & Street Walker as she appeared at Bow Street on Tuesd.y Oct.r 8.th.
[n.d., c.1799.]
Rare etching. Sheet: 155 x 195mm (6 x 7¾"). Trimmed within plate and into title.
A full-length portrait of Jane Gibbs, who achieved notoriety during two trials held in the autumn of 1799. Gibbs was a street walker who often used extortion to make her money, she would approach men and solicit her services or ask for money, if they did not oblige she would threaten to say that they had tried to rob her and this would usually loosen their purse strings. However, a man named Jeremiah Beck refused to go along with her scheme so she took him to court. Unfortunately for Gibbs, several passers by and a juror recognised her and the case was thrown out. Not long after Gibbs attempted the same robbery on another man but the watchman recognised her from print shop windows and arrested her, she was eventually sent to Bedlam.
[Ref: 41542]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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James Greenacre. Sarah Gale
James Greenacre. Sarah Gale [facsimile signatures].
[n.d., c.1837.]
Lithographic portrait, scarce. Sheet 150 x 240mm (6 x 9½") with sheet with lithographic text and facsimile handwriting underneath, total length 445mm (17½"). Some soiling, backed with album paper.
James Greenacre (1785-1837), murderer, and his mistress Sarah Gale. Greenacre owned a large grocery shop on Old Kent Road, where he displayed political pamphlets. He was known for his radical opinions and, as an associate of Arthur Thistlewood, narrowly escaped arrest for involvement in the Cato Street conspiracy. After a spell in America Greenacre returned to London in 1835 and rumours began to circulate: he was accused of murdering a child, and of drugging a woman to procure an abortion, but both cases foundered for lack of evidence. In 1836 Greenacre advertised for a partner to help him exploit and develop the washing machine he had invented while in America, and a washerwoman named Hannah Brown agreed to go into business with him. On 24 December 1836 (the day before she was due to become his fifth wife) he murdered her, cut up the body and disposed of the pieces in various parts of London. On 24 March 1837 Greenacre and Gale were arrested in Kennington as they were preparing to set sail for America. Greenacre insisted Gale had not known about the murder, and she was transported to Australia, where she died in 1888. Greenacre, however, was hanged on 2 May 1837 in front of some 20,000 spectators at Newgate. He enjoyed posthumous celebrity: his head was examined by phrenologists, a waxwork effigy of him was displayed at Madame Tussauds, and plays about his life were performed at theatres. Australian interest.
Kivell & Spence: Pg 121.
[Ref: 41304]   £260.00  
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James Greenacre. Sarah Gale
James Greenacre. Sarah Gale
[Anon., c.1837]
Etching with very fine hand-colouring, sheet 215 x 130mm (8½ x 5"). Very rare; 'Webster Collection' stamp verso.
James Greenacre (1785-1837), murderer, and his mistress Sarah Gale. Greenacre owned a large grocery shop on Old Kent Road, where he displayed political pamphlets. He was known for his radical opinions and as an associate of Arthur Thistlewood narrowly escaped arrest for involvement in the Cato Street conspiracy. After a spell in America Greenacre returned to London in 1835 and rumours began to circulate: he was accused of murdering a child, and of drugging a woman to procure an abortion, but both cases foundered for lack of evidence. In 1836 Greenacre advertised for a partner to help him exploit and develop the washing machine he had invented while in America, and a washerwoman named Hannah Brown agreed to go into business with him. On 24 December 1836 (the day before she was due to become his fifth wife) he murdered her, cut up the body and disposed of the pieces in various parts of London. On 24 March 1837 Greenacre and Gale were arrested in Kennington as they were preparing to set sail for America. Greenacre insisted Gale had not known about the murder, and she was transported to Australia, where she died in 1888. Greenacre, however, was hanged on 2 May 1837 in front of some 20,000 spectators at Newgate. He enjoyed posthumous celebrity: his head was examined by phrenologists, a waxwork effigy of him was displayed at Madame Tussauds, and plays about his life were performed at theatres.
Kivell & Spence: Pg 121.
[Ref: 37080]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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Gruet au Pilory.
Gruet au Pilory. Jean-Francois Gruet Huissier à Cheval au Chastelet de Paris, Inspecteur de Police, Preposé au Recouvrement des debets de la Capitation des Communaute de la Ville de Paris, condamné par Chambre de Justice, le 7e Decembre 1716 [...]
[Anon]
Engraving, sheet 310 x 220mm (12¼ x 8½"). Trimmed inside platemark; creasing.
A criminal placed in a pillory (a wooden framework with holes for securing the head and hands, for humiliation and often as a preface to further punishment), a demonstration of the draconian punishment methods of the Ancien Regime.
[Ref: 39427]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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John Hatfield.
John Hatfield.
Pub. Jan. 1810, by Nuttall, Fisher & Dixon, Liverpool.
Stipple. Sheet size: 140 x 85mm (5½ x 3¼"). Trimmed inside plate.
John Hatfield (1758 - 1803) was a notorious English forger, bigamist and imposter.
[Ref: 38034]   £45.00   (£54.00 incl.VAT)
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