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A Block for the Wigs_or, the new State Whiligig.
A Block for the Wigs_or, the new State Whiligig. Poor John Bull's House plundered at Noon Day.
[James Gillray.]
Pub.d May 5th 1783 by W. Humphrey No. 227 Strand.
Etching, with manuscript annotation. Sheet: 350 x 255mm, (13¾ x 10"). Trimmed within plate. Damaged at top right corner.
A satirical print commenting on the unlikely coalition between Charles James Fox (1749-1806) and Lord North (1732-1792) known as the Fox-North Coalition government, which was despised by George III. The scene shows, Fox, North, Edmund Burke, the Viscount Keppel and Lord Bute atop a merry-go-round, at the centre a statue of George III as a wig block or 'block for the Whigs'. In the background two figures plunder John Bull's house while he sits by the merry-go-round distracted by talk of liberty.
BM Satire 6227
[Ref: 41512]   £260.00  
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The Bulstrode Siren.
The Bulstrode Siren. Blest as th'immortal Gods is he / The youth who fondly sists by thee, / And sees and hears thee all the while / Softly Sing and sweetly smile.
J. Gillray del.t. 1803.
London, Published by John Miller, Bridge Street & W. Blackwood, Edinburgh. [n.d., c.1820.]
Coloured engraving. 285 x 215mm (11¼ x 8½").
Caricature of William Henry Cavendish Cavendish-Bentinck (1738-1809), 3rd Duke of Portland and Elizabeth Billington (1768-1818), a famed opera singer whom he paid to sing for him at his estate at Bulstode. A copy of Gilray's original caricature, as published by Humphrey.
BM: 10168.
[Ref: 42447]   £110.00   (£132.00 incl.VAT)
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Two-Penny Whist.
Two-Penny Whist.
[J. Gillray ad viv.m fec.t.]
[Pub.d Jan.y 11th 1796, by H. Humphrey New Bond Street.]
Etching with fine hand-colouring, sheet 210 x 310mm (8¾ x 11¼"). Trimmed around image and title, losing some text; glued to album sheet (four small views of Paris verso).
A game of whist at the house of publisher Hannah Humphrey in New Bond Street. The servant 'Betty', grinning triumphantly, holds out the ace of spades with which she is about to take the seventh consecutive trick. The bespectacled Humphrey sits to her left; then a man identified as either the dealer and restorer Mortimer or Mr. Jeffrey (presumably the enemy of Mrs. Fitzherbert); and finally Tholdal, a German. Although the British Museum describes this print as being 'From a sketch by an amateur', it is likely to be by Gillray, who lived with Hannah Humphrey for many years. This and 'A Decent Story' (1795) are intimate scenes of their domestic arrangements: both prints are visible in the Humprey shop window in Gillray's 'Very Slippy-Weather' (1808), alongside Gillray's more famous prints, suggesting a sentimental importance.
BM Satires 8885
[Ref: 43920]   £260.00  
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Councillor Ego. _ i:e: little i, myself i.
Councillor Ego. _ i:e: little i, myself i.
J.s Gillray d & f.
Published Oct.r 1st 1798. by J.Wright, No. 169 Piccadilly London.
Engraving. 190 x 220mm.
Thomas Erskine, 1st Baron Erskine, (1750-1823), Lord Chancellor, known for his egotism.
[Ref: 6856]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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A Decent Story.
A Decent Story.
[Drawn and etched by James Gillray.]
Pub.d Nov.r 9th 1795, by H. Humphrey, No 37, New Bond Street.
Hand coloured etching, printed border 225 x 295mm (9 x 11½"). Laid on card; lacking margin outside the plate mark at sides.
Five people sit around a table drinking port, a raconteur holding forth. Hannah Humphrey (second right, with distinctive chin) and a parson listen with smiles, although an officer is more interested in the woman at the other end of the table. Although the British Museum describes this print as being 'From a sketch by an amateur', it is likely to be by Gillray, who lived with Hannah Humphrey for many years. This and 'Two-penny Whist' (1796) are intimate scenes of their domestic arrangements: both prints are visible in the Humprey shop window in Gillray's 'Very Slippy-Weather' (1808), alongside Gillray's more famous prints, suggesting a sentimental importance.
BM Satires 8753.
[Ref: 23165]   £450.00  
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A Decent Story.
A Decent Story.
[Drawn and etched by James Gillray.]
Pub.d Nov.r 9th 1795, by H. Humphrey No 37, New Bond Street.
Coloured etching. Sheet 220 x 295mm (8¾ x 11½"). Trimmed to plate, tear in top edge.
Five people sit around a table drinking port, a raconteur holding forth. Hannah Humphrey (second right, with distinctive chin) and a parson listen with smiles, although an officer is more interested in the woman at the other end of the table. Although the British Museum describes this print as being 'From a sketch by an amateur', it is likely to be by Gillray, who lived with Hannah Humphrey for many years. This and 'Two-penny Whist' (1796) are intimate scenes of their domestic arrangements: both prints are visible in the Humprey shop window in Gillray's 'Very Slippy-Weather' (1808), alongside Gillray's more famous prints, suggesting a sentimental importance.
BM Satires 8753.
[Ref: 33095]   £320.00  
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Fast-Asleep.
Fast-Asleep.
[James Gillray.]
London, Publish'd Nov.r 1.st 1806 by H. Humphrey, 27 St James's Street.
Hand-coloured etching. In ink verso "Leighton"; Sheet: 210 x 260mm (8¼ x 10¼"). Trimmed, surface dirt and marking. Creases.
A comic scene showing a man fast asleep in his chair, his wig falling to the ground.
[Ref: 42714]   £260.00  
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Un Diplomatique, settling affairs at Stevens's.
Un Diplomatique, settling affairs at Stevens's. Comte Haslang [ms in lower margin]
Pubd June 9th 1797 by H. Humphrey 27 St. James's Square
Etching with hand-colouring, sheet 340 x 260mm (13¼ x 10¼"). Trimmed inside platemark; slight crease.
Count Haslang sits in Stevens's, the fashionable Bond Street coffee-house, holding a wine-glass as if gesticulating in response to some person (not pictured) at whom he looks sourly. Haslang, Bavarian envoy to London, had long the subject of ridicule for both his love affairs and lack of money. Etched by James Gillray (1756-1815), caricaturist now widely regarded as the greatest of all political satirists. A celebrity in his own lifetime, Gillray's work was known and admired internationally. In the Victorian period his work was considered too vulgar and coarse; as McConnell and Heneage (DNB) write, 'a generation inclined to cover up the legs of pianos in the interests of modesty was hardly likely to welcome pictures of nude ladies dancing behind a gauze screen..., still less French fishwives thrashing the bare bottoms of nuns'. However, in the second half of the 20th century his importance has been recognized in major exhibitions and the assembling of significant collections of his work by several major institutions.
BM Satires 9067
[Ref: 39526]   £480.00  
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Gentle Emetic.
Gentle Emetic.
[by James Gillray.]
Publish'd Jany. 28th. 1804, by H. Humphrey, St James's Street, London.
Coloured etching. 265 x 200mm (10½ x 8"). Slight damage on left, laid on album paper.
An invalid sits before a bowl, his mournful-looking manservant holding his head as he waits for the inevitable. One in a series (with 'Taking Physick', 'Brisk - Cathartic', 'Breathing a Vein' & 'Charming - Well again), all of which appear in Humphrey's shop window in Gillray's 'Very Slippy-Weather' (1808), alongside some of Gillray's more famous satires. As the display celebrates Gillray's domestic arrangements (it includes two prints in which Hannah Humphrey, Gillray's partner and publisher, is recognisable) it is conceivable that the patient in this satire is Gillray himself. The series certainly had significance for the caricaturist.
BM Satires 10304.
[Ref: 33161]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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Breathing a vein.
Breathing a vein.
[James Gillray.]
Publish'd Jany 28th 1804 by H. Humphrey St. James Street London.
Coloured etching. Sheet: 190 x 255mm (7½ x 10"). Trimmed to printed border.
An invalid, dressed in breeches, waistcoat and nightcap, looks away as his manservant directs a spurt of blood from his bicep to a bowl. sits before a bowl, his mournful-looking manservant holding his head as he waits for the inevitable. One in a series (with 'Taking Physick', 'Gentle Emetic', 'Brisk - Cathartic' & 'Charming - Well again), all of which appear in Humphrey's shop window in Gillray's 'Very Slippy-Weather' (1808), alongside some of Gillray's more famous satires. As the display celebrates Gillray's domestic arrangements (it includes two prints in which Hannah Humphrey, Gillray's partner and publisher, is recognisable) it is conceivable that the patient in this satire is Gillray himself. The series certainly had significance for the caricaturist.
BM Satire 10306
[Ref: 41527]   £220.00  
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Charming - well again.
Charming - well again.
[by James Gillray.]
Publish'd Jany. 28th. 1804, by H. Humphrey, St James's Street, London.
Coloured etching. Sheet: 190 x 255mm (7½ x 10"). Trimmed to printed border.
A convalescent, still wearing a nightcap, sits at small dinner-table, his appetite restored. He holds up a glass of wine with a smile of satisfaction and is about to carve a bird. Behind his chair stands a stout footman in livery, pleased with the improvement. One in a series (with 'Gentle Emetic', 'Taking Physic', 'Brisk - Cathartic' & 'Breathing a Vein'), all of which appear in Humphrey's shop window in Gillray's 'Very Slippy-Weather' (1808), alongside some of Gillray's more famous satires. As the display celebrates Gillray's domestic arrangements (it includes two prints in which Hannah Humphrey, Gillray's partner and publisher, is recognisable) it is conceivable that the patient in this satire is Gillray himself. The series certainly had significance for the caricaturist.
BM Satires 10307.
[Ref: 41526]   £220.00  
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M.r James Gillray.
M.r James Gillray.
From a miniature painted by himself & Engraved by Cha.s Turner.
London, Published april 19 1819 by G.Humphrey, 27 S.t James's Street.
Mezzotint. Plate: 300 x 395mm (12 x 15½") very large margins. Some creasing and marking.
A portrait of caricaturist and printmaker James Gillray (1757-1815).
[Ref: 42599]   £360.00  
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The Kettle hooting the Porridge-Pot.
The Kettle hooting the Porridge-Pot.
[J. Gillray.]
Pubd. July 23d 1782 by P. J. Leatherhead.
Etching with colour, added by hand, but later, Sheet 240 x 330mm, 9½ x 13". Trimmed.
Political satire: William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne (1737 - 1805) (left), as the proverbial kettle, looks at Charles James Fox (1749 - 1806) (right), the (porridge) pot, who is running away down a road in a landscape. Shelburne has a complacent smile and holds out his hands, pointing towards Fox; his left foot is on the neck of a goose, which lies on its back on the ground. He is saying, 'Oh do but look how black his Arse is!' Fox (right) with the head of a fox, his body a large circular pot, blackened underneath, is running away with an alarmed expression, his hands held up, his tongue hanging out. In the centre of the design, between the two figures is a signpost, its arm, pointing to the right, forms into a human hand holding a die in its fingers, pointing in the direction in which Fox is running. The arm of the post is inscribed 'TO BROOKS'S'; from it hangs a rope with a noose at the end of it. On the post hangs a sign inscribed 'To be Lett- either as a Gibbet or Direction Post'. Fox, destitute on leaving office, is running off to his gambling associates at Brooks's club in St. James's Street for his support, while, politically speaking, Shelburne is depicted as equally black. Fox's geese, in caricature, usually represents the electors of Westminster. By James Gillray (1756 - 1815). George suggests that the publisher 'Leatherhead' is fictitious. This is the only satire in the BM catalogue on which that name appears.
BM Satires 6013.
[Ref: 22467]   £260.00  
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[General Robert Manners.]
[General Robert Manners.] '' - Gentle manners, with affections mild, in wit a man, simplicity a child''.
[by James Gillray.]
Pub.d Nov.r 4th 1798. by H Humphrey. St James's Street.
Etching. 260 x 180mm (10¼ x 7") very large margins.
Probably Robert Manners (1758-1832), grandson of the 2nd Duke of Rutland, MP for Cambridge 1791, gazetted Major-General 3 May 1796, full general in 1813.
BM 9288; the original water-colour, by an amateur (closely followed by Gillray), is in the Print Room.
[Ref: 43268]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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A Military Sketch, of a Gilt Stick, or Poker Emblazoned.
A Military Sketch, of a Gilt Stick, or Poker Emblazoned.
[James Gillray.]
Pubd June 11th 1800. by H. Humphrey 27 St James's Street.
Hand coloured etching. Sheet size: 250 x 200mm (9¾ x 8"). Trimmed inside platemark.
Major-General Lord Cathcart stands stiffly in profile to the left. He wears court dress with a military cast, heavily gold laced, and a long pigtail. His right hand rests on the head of a gold-headed cane. A figured carpet and bare wall complete the design.
BM Satires 9564.
[Ref: 35184]   £280.00  
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A Natural Crop; - alias - A Norfolk dumpling.
A Natural Crop; - alias - A Norfolk dumpling.
Pubd. Sepr. 21st. 1791. by H. Humphrey N.18 Old Bond Street.
Etching in sepia, 185 x 145mm. 7¼ x 5¾". Uncut sheet.
A satirical portrait of the Bernard Edward Howard, twelfth Duke of Norfolk (1765 - 1842), by James Gillray (1756 - 1815). In his left hand is the baton of Earl Marshal. He wears top-boots, a slouched hat, and his hair is closely cropped. The fashion for cropped hair began in 1791. Earlier caricatures show the Duke wearing his own hair without powder, hanging on his neck.
BM Satires: 8000.
[Ref: 8920]   £190.00   (£228.00 incl.VAT)
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Pacific Overtures_or_a Flight from St. Cloud's_over the Water to Charley_a new Dramatic Peace now Rehearsing.
Pacific Overtures_or_a Flight from St. Cloud's_over the Water to Charley_a new Dramatic Peace now Rehearsing.
Jas. Gillray dis.l Pub.d. April 5th 1806. [Later copy.]
London Published by John Miller Bridge Street and W. Blackwood Edinburgh.
Hand-colour etching. Sheet: 410 x 330mm (16 x 13"). Trimmed, laid on board, paper tone, and damage to edges.
A comic scene showing Napoleon and George III acting out a peace negotiation on a stage. A statue of William Pitt stands behind the king. Napoleon points at a large list of demands including 'Acknowledgement of me as Emperor', 'Abandon Malta & Gibraltar', After 'Renounce all Continental Connections'.
BM Satire 10549.
[Ref: 44424]   £230.00  
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[Paul I of Russia] The Magnanimous Ally. Painted at St Petersburg 1799.
[Paul I of Russia] The Magnanimous Ally. Painted at St Petersburg 1799.
[by James Gillray.]
Published September 17th 1799 by H. Humphrey No 27 St James's Street London.
Etching. Sheet 320 x 245mm (12½ x 9¾"). Trimmed to printed border, creased.
A caricature portrait of Tsar Paul I (1754-1801), shown in full ceremonial uniform including two Crosses of the Order of the Knights of St John, standing on a French revolutionary standard. Although the Russians joined with the British to invade the Batavian Republic in August 1799 to neutralise its navy, there was a general dislike of both Paul and the coalition.
BM: 9415.
[Ref: 39009]   £260.00  
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Rodney Triumphant.__or__Admiral Lee-Shore in the Dumps
Rodney Triumphant.__or__Admiral Lee-Shore in the Dumps
[by James Gillray]
Political Characters & Caracatures of 1782. N° 3 Pub.d May 31st 1782 by E'D'Achery St James Street London
Etching with hand-colouring, sheet 250 x 350mm (9¾ x 13¾"). Trimmed inside platemark.
George Bridges Rodney stands on the French flag laid down by François De Grasse following the Battle of the Saintes, a naval battle fought off Dominica in 1782 during the American War of Independence in which Rodney's British fleet defeated the French fleet led by De Grasse. While sailors behind Rodney celebrate, British politicians on the left are less jubilant. Shortly before news of Rodney's victory reached England, Lord North had resigned as prime minister and the new ministry had decided to replace Rodney as commander-in-chief of the Leeward Isles (a group of islands in the West Indies) with Admiral Hugh Pigot. As Rodney's victory (which Charles James Fox described as 'the most brilliant victory that this country had seen this century') became known, unsuccessful attempts were made to recall Pigot, causing the awkward situtation depicted by Gillray here and in other satires of the time. Etched by James Gillray (1756-1815), caricaturist now widely regarded as the greatest of all political satirists. A celebrity in his own lifetime, Gillray's work was known and admired internationally. In the Victorian period his work was considered too vulgar and coarse; as McConnell and Heneage (DNB) write, 'a generation inclined to cover up the legs of pianos in the interests of modesty was hardly likely to welcome pictures of nude ladies dancing behind a gauze screen..., still less French fishwives thrashing the bare bottoms of nuns'. However, in the second half of the 20th century his importance has been recognized in major exhibitions and the assembling of significant collections of his work by several major institutions.
BM Satires 5992
[Ref: 43912]   £520.00  
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Sampson Overcome by a Philistian.
Sampson Overcome by a Philistian. "If e'er we want a very valiant Knight, / "Have we not Sampson_ bold Sir Compton Wright!...
Invented by a Thief! Engraved by a Pickpocket! [Gillray.]
Published by Bonde at the Thieftakers office Bow Street.
Coloured engraving. 345 x 235mm. Trimmed within plate, some of the inscription print weak.
A satire on the Bow Street Runners, under the direction of Sir Sampson Wright (knighted September 1782). A frequent accusation was the use of entrapment to earn rewards. On the left is the clerk Bond (Bonde).
BM: 6121.
[Ref: 6792]   £240.00  
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S.t Cecilia.
S.t Cecilia.
[By James Gillray.]
Pub.d April 24th 1782, by H.Humphrey, New Bond Street.
Etching on Whatman paper watermarked 1813. 225 x 165mm.
A burlesque of Reynolds's painting of Mrs. Sheridan as 'St. Cecilia'. Lady Cecilia Johnston sits at the organ in profile to the right, on a low stool, her face ht by rays which descend through clouds. The place of the two angels in Reynolds's picture is taken by two squalling cats, who sit on the player's left, a book of music propped up in front of them.
[Ref: 7189]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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Oh! Listen to the Voice of Love.
Oh! Listen to the Voice of Love.
Ja.s Gillray del.t.
[n.d., c.1799.]
Hand-coloured etching. Sheet: 215 x 185mm (8½ x 7¼"). Trimmed to printed border.
A interior scene in which an ugly man kneels before a plain woman holding a fan.
Copy of BM Satire 9450.
[Ref: 43648]   £260.00  
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Wide-Awake.
Wide-Awake.
[after James Gillray]
[n.d., c.1806.]
Hand-coloured etching. Sheet: 225 x 185mm (9 x 7¼"). Trimmed.
A comic scene in which an old man is startled awake from a nap by two howling cats.
Copy of BM Satire 10645.
[Ref: 43650]   £260.00  
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[William IV when Duke of Clarence] Nauticus.
[William IV when Duke of Clarence] Nauticus. ''Those Lips were made for Kissing Ladies!''.
[by James Gillray.]
London - Pub.d Oct.r 11the 1791. by H. Humphrey, No 18 Old Bond Street.
Coloured etching. 185 x 160mm (7¼ x 6¼"). Mounted in album paper.
A caricature portrait of William, Duke of Clarence, smiling with bulbous lips, hair is shaggy and uncurled under a large round hat, wearing his naval uniform with star. It was published the year he started his long affair with actress Mrs Jordan.
BM Satires 7964.
[Ref: 43899]   £420.00  
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[Prince William of Gloucester] Patern-Staff.
[Prince William of Gloucester] Patern-Staff. Weymouth, 1797.
[by James Gillray.]
Pub.d Nov.r 9th 1797 by H. Humphrey. 27 St James's Street.
Etching. 250 x 170mm (9¾ x 6¾") very large margins.
A rear view of a small, thin officer, wearing a bicorn hat, face obscured, believed to be William Frederick, 2nd Duke of Gloucester (1776-1834), Field Marshal. Gillray produced three satires relating to George III's summer holiday in Weymouth in 1797, when cavalry and infantry camps were erected nearby.
BM 9070.
[Ref: 43267]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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