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Miss Harper
Miss Harper
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, rare, with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Good impression; glued to backing sheet along left edge at corners; uncut.
Elizabeth Bannister (née Harper) (1757-1849), actress and singer. She also accompanied herself on the guitar, as shown in John Russell's 1799 portrait. At the time this print was made Harper was only three years into her career but was already earning high salaries. In 1778 she was contracted to perform at the Pantheon (on London's Oxford Street) for two years, earning one thousand pounds in the process. In 1783 she married the actor and comedian John Bannister, and she retired in 1792. From a set of small mezzotint portraits of actresses and singers, published by the printseller William Richardson in 1780, apparently to follow up a similar set of actor portraits published the previous year. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: Oettingen-Wallenstein collection, and collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii.
[Ref: 36669]   £240.00  
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Miss Harper [in pencil]
Miss Harper [in pencil]
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, rare with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Good impression; glued to backing sheet along left edge. Uncut.
Elizabeth Bannister (née Harper) (1757-1849), actress and singer. She also accompanied herself on the guitar, as shown in John Russell's 1799 portrait. At the time this print was made Harper was only three years into her career but was already earning high salaries. In 1778 she was contracted to perform at the Pantheon (on London's Oxford Street) for two years, earning one thousand pounds in the process. In 1783 she married the actor and comedian John Bannister, and she retired in 1792. From a set of small mezzotint portraits of actresses and singers, published by the printseller William Richardson in 1780, apparently to follow up a similar set of actor portraits published the previous year. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 ii/iii. Ex: Oettingen-Wallerstein Collection.
[Ref: 36671]   £240.00  
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My Charming Boy! 431
My Charming Boy! 431
Dighton del.
London printed for Bowles & Carver, No. 69 St Paul's Church Yard. Published 5 March 1795.
Mezzotint with very large margins. Platemark: 150 x 110mm (6 x4¼"). Small stain in title area.
A woman shown three-quarters length to right, smiling towards the viewer and holding a little boy in skirts, while he plays with her hair; in an oval. For coloured impression, see item ref: 32844.
Ex: collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 32845]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
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My Charming Boy! 431
My Charming Boy! 431
Dighton del.
London printed for Bowles & Carver, No. 69 St Paul's Church Yard.
Hand coloured mezzotint with very large margins Platemark: 150 x 110mm (6 x4¼"). Small puncture mark in top margin outside platemark. Light creasing to sheet. Small tear to lower left platemark.
A woman shown three-quarters length to right, smiling towards the viewer and holding a little boy in skirts, while he plays with her hair; in an oval. For uncoloured impression, see item ref: 32845.
CLB i/iii. Ex: collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 32844]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
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Well! I Can't Help It.
Well! I Can't Help It.
[after Robert Dighton]
Printed for & Sold by Bowles & Carver / No. 69 St Pauls Church Yard, London. [n.d., c.1796] 400
Mezzotint with hand-colouring, sheet 150 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Trimmed to image; late impression.
Man making a 'horns' sign with his right hand. One of many 'droll' mezzotints in roundels made from the designs of Robert Dighton (1751-1814), who after the death of John Collet in 1780 became the foremost designer of such images.
Ex: collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; BM Satires 8918; for another droll after Dighton see ref. 32347.
[Ref: 32366]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
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Well! I Can't Help It.
Well! I Can't Help It.
[after Robert Dighton]
Printed for & Sold by Bowles & Carver / No. 69 St Pauls Church Yard, London. [n.d., c.1796] 400
Mezzotint with very large margins, platemark 155 x 110mm (6 x 4½").
Man making a 'horns' sign with his right hand. One of many 'droll' mezzotints in roundels made from the designs of Robert Dighton (1751-1814), who after the death of John Collet in 1780 became the foremost designer of such images.
Ex: collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; BM Satires 8918; for another droll after Dighton see ref. 32347.
[Ref: 32365]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
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Who Cares for You?
Who Cares for You?
[after Robert Dighton.]
Printed for & Sold by Carington Bowles / No. 69 St Pauls Church Yard, London. [n.d., c.1793]
Mezzotint with hand-colouring, small margins on 3 sides; sheet 150 x 120mm (6 x 4½"). Trimmed to platemark lower edge; faint crease lower right.
A buxom prostitute (see BM Satires) standing hands on hips. One of many 'droll' mezzotints in roundels made from the designs of Robert Dighton (1751-1814), who after the death of John Collet in 1780 became the foremost designer of such images.
Ex: collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CLB i/ii; BM Satires 8418; for another droll after Dighton see ref. 32380
[Ref: 32382]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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Twenty Thousand I've got___ How Lucky's my Lot.
Twenty Thousand I've got___ How Lucky's my Lot.
[after ?Robert Dighton]
Printed for Bowles & Carver / No. 69 St Pauls Church Yard, London, Publish'd as the Act directs [date excised] 326
Mezzotint with hand-colouring and large margins, platemark 150 x 110mm (6 x 4½").
A Royal Marine clutches a bag of prize money labelled '£20,000'. Much money was to be earned during the early years of the French Revolutionary Wars, when even ordinary seamen shared in the proceeds of the sale of enemy ships captured by the Royal Navy, although £20,000 is probably an exaggeration. . Probably one of many 'droll' mezzotints made from the designs of Robert Dighton (1751-1814), who after the death of John Collet in 1780, became the foremost designer of such images, particularly for Carington Bowles.
Ex: collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CLB iii/iii; for another droll after Dighton see ref. 32347
[Ref: 32359]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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We're All in the Suds.
We're All in the Suds.
[after Robert Dighton]
Printed for & Sold by Bowles & Carver / No. 69 St Pauls Church Yard, London. / Publish'd as the Act directs 4 June 1800. 381
Mezzotint with hand-colouring and large margins, platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Two horizontal creases to top of image; holes from silverfish at top.
Man holding his shaving dish in his left hand and the 'Gazette Extraordinary' in his right. One of many 'droll' mezzotints in roundels made from the designs of Robert Dighton (1751-1814), who after the death of John Collet in 1780 became the foremost designer of such images.
Ex: collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CLB ii/ii for another droll after Dighton see ref. 32347.
[Ref: 32363]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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We're All in the Suds.
We're All in the Suds.
[after Robert Dighton]
Printed for & Sold by Bowles & Carver / No. 69 St Pauls Church Yard, London. / [Publish'd as the Act directs 4 June 1800]
Mezzotint, sheet 150 x 120mm (6 x 4¾"). Trimmed inside platemark at bottom, losing publication line; border coloured yellow.
Man holding his shaving dish in his left hand and the 'Gazette Extraordinary' in his right. One of many 'droll' mezzotints in roundels made from the designs of Robert Dighton (1751-1814), who after the death of John Collet in 1780 became the foremost designer of such images. Unusual presentation with coloured border.
Ex: collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CLB ii/ii; for another droll after Dighton see ref. 32347.
[Ref: 32364]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
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What d'ye think of ME?
What d'ye think of ME?
[after Robert Dighton]
Printed for & Sold by Bowles & Carver / No. 69 St Pauls Church Yard, London. [n.d., c.1796]
Mezzotint with large margins, sheet 150 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Repaired small tear top right.
A buxom woman, probably a St. Giles's barmaid, standing hands on hips. Behind her is a chalked ale-house score and small tankard (indicating gin) and a glass. One of many 'droll' mezzotints in roundels made from the designs of Robert Dighton (1751-1814), who after the death of John Collet in 1780 became the foremost designer of such images.
Ex: collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CLB ii/ii [series number excised]; BM Satires 9103; for another droll after Dighton see ref. 32347
[Ref: 32381]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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Mr. Dodd.
Mr. Dodd.
R. Dighton Pinx.t. R. Laurie Sculp
Published as the act Directs July 10th 1779 by W.m Richardson No.68 High Holborn
Mezzotint with thread margins, platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½").
James William Dodd (c.1740-1796), actor. Dodd became a strolling player aged sixteen, and acted in Sheffield, Norfolk and Bath before Garrick recruited him for his Drury Lane company in 1765. Dodd was to remain at Drury Lane for the next thirty years, and while he never challenged Tom King as the principal comedian of the company, he was respected by audiences and colleagues. More problematic was his private life: his indiscretions with Covent Garden actress Mary Bulkley caused scandal and his fledgling attempts at management were jeopardised by his rudeness and attempts to seduce young actresses. Physically Dodd was very small, and described as having a 'white, calf-like stupid face'. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii.
[Ref: 36694]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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Mr. Garrick.
Mr. Garrick.
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs July 10. 1779 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Thread (partly damaged) margins; water staining not showing on front.
David Garrick (1717-1779), English actor and theatrical manager. The most celebrated actor of his day, he did more than anyone else to change the British acting style, which prioritised energy and engagement above accuracy and control. As a manager (primarily of the Drury Lane Theatre, Covent Garden) he presided over the creation of Shakespeare as national poet and icon, while shaping the texts to suit the demands of his patrons. The supremacy of Drury Lane during Garrick's management was not to be matched until Irving's reign at the Lyceum in the following century, and in the names of pubs and streets, and the famous Garrick Club, Covent Garden is filled with echoes of one of the greatest men to have occupied the area. From a set of small mezzotint portraits of actors published by the printseller William Richardson in 1779. Garrick had died a few months before the print was published. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii.
[Ref: 36674]   £220.00  
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Mr. Garrick.
Mr. Garrick.
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs July 10. 1779 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, good impression with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Uncut.
David Garrick (1717-1779), English actor and theatrical manager. The most celebrated actor of his day, he did more than anyone else to change the British acting style, which prioritised energy and engagement above accuracy and control. As a manager (primarily of the Drury Lane Theatre, Covent Garden) he presided over the creation of Shakespeare as national poet and icon, while shaping the texts to suit the demands of his patrons. The supremacy of Drury Lane during Garrick's management was not to be matched until Irving's reign at the Lyceum in the following century, and in the names of pubs and streets, and the famous Garrick Club, Covent Garden is filled with echoes of one of the greatest men to have occupied the area. From a set of small mezzotint portraits of actors published by the printseller William Richardson in 1779. Garrick had died a few months before the print was published. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: Oettingen-Wallenstein collection and collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii.
[Ref: 36675]   £330.00  
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A Journeyman Parson with a Bare Existance. 344
A Journeyman Parson with a Bare Existance. 344
[After Robert Dighton].
London, Printed for & sold by Bowles & Carver, No.69 in St. Pauls Church Yard. [n.d., c.1782].
Hand coloured mezzotint. Platemark: 152 x 110mm (6 x 4¼"). Very large margins. Light staining to margins. Small puncture mark in title area.
A scene in a poor interior of a wooden house. A dining room with a parson's family of four around a table eating beans, while the parson sits on the right, gnawing a bone, with a kitten looking up at the table from below. In the bottom right corner on the floor is a book incribed, 'A Charity Sermon'.
Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 32985]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[Mr. Mattocks.]
[Mr. Mattocks.]
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp [m.s.]
Published as the act Directs July 1st 1779
Mezzotint, good first state impression with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Slight paper tone.
George Mattocks (1734/5-1804), singer and theatre manager. Initially a singer in Covent Garden and the provinces, Mattocks leased the Portsmouth theatre in 1771 and the following year leased the newly built Theatre Royal in Liverpool alongside the Covent Garden prompter Joseph Younger. They also took a twenty-one-year lease on the Manchester theatre in 1775 and Mattocks became involved with a Birmingham theatre in 1779. Mattocks concentrated on management but began to lose singing roles in London to younger performers, and in 1784 moved with his wife, singer and actress Isabella Mattocks, to the north of England. Younger died that year, leaving Mattocks in sole charge of the Liverpool and Manchester theatres, sustaining heavy losses. Isabella returned to performing in London and George was declared bankrupt in 1788 after which he worked in administrative positions at other theatres. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS ii/iii. For Isabella Mattocks see refs 36671-2
[Ref: 36676]   £240.00  
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Mr. Mattocks.
Mr. Mattocks.
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Published as the act Directs July 10th 1779 by W.m Richardson No.68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Good impression with very large margins; glued to backing sheet along left edge.
George Mattocks (1734/5-1804), singer and theatre manager. Initially a singer in Covent Garden and the provinces, Mattocks leased the Portsmouth theatre in 1771 and the following year leased the newly built Theatre Royal in Liverpool alongside the Covent Garden prompter Joseph Younger. They also took a twenty-one-year lease on the Manchester theatre in 1775 and Mattocks became involved with a Birmingham theatre in 1779. Mattocks concentrated on management but began to lose singing roles in London to younger performers, and in 1784 moved with his wife, singer and actress Isabella Mattocks, to the north of England. Younger died that year, leaving Mattocks in sole charge of the Liverpool and Manchester theatres, sustaining heavy losses. Isabella returned to performing in London and George was declared bankrupt in 1788 after which he worked in administrative positions at other theatres. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: Oettingen-Wallestein collection and collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii. For Isabella Mattocks see refs 36671-2
[Ref: 36677]   £260.00  
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Mrs. Mattocks.
Mrs. Mattocks.
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, rare with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Good impression; glued to backing sheet along left edge at corners. Uncut.
Isabella Mattocks (née Hallam) (1746-1826), actress and singer. Born into a theatrical family, her father Lewis moved to America in 1752, having run into financial difficulties. He took his wife and other children but left Isabella in the care of his sister and her second husband, actor John Barrington. Isabella probably made her stage debut that year, aged five, appearing intermittently on stage until she joined the Covent Garden company aged sixteen, where she spent most of her career. She married the young tenor George Mattocks, who performed alongside her, in 1765. In 1784-6 Mattocks left Covent Garden to work in Liverpool and Manchester where her husband managed theatres, but the enterprises ruined him financially and she subsequently returned to Covent Garden, although she generally returned to Liverpool in the summers. Mattocks retired in 1808. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: Oettingen-Wallenstein collection, and collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii; for George Mattocks see refs. 36676-7
[Ref: 36670]   £240.00  
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[Mrs. Mattocks.]
[Mrs. Mattocks.]
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, good impression with large margins, rare; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Uncut. Annotations in ink verso (ex Suckling).
Isabella Mattocks (née Hallam) (1746-1826), actress and singer. Born into a theatrical family, her father Lewis moved to America in 1752, having run into financial difficulties. He took his wife and other children but left Isabella in the care of his sister and her second husband, actor John Barrington. Isabella probably made her stage debut that year, aged five, appearing intermittently on stage until she joined the Covent Garden company aged sixteen, where she spent most of her career. She married the young tenor George Mattocks, who performed alongside her, in 1765. In 1784-6 Mattocks left Covent Garden to work in Liverpool and Manchester where her husband managed theatres, but the enterprises ruined him financially and she subsequently returned to Covent Garden, although she generally returned to Liverpool in the summers. Mattocks retired in 1808. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 ii/iii; for George Mattocks see refs. 36676-7
[Ref: 36672]   £240.00  
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Mr. Palmer
Mr. Palmer
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs July 10. 1779 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, good impression with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Uncut. Glued to backing sheet top left corner.
John Palmer (1744-98), actor, also known as 'Plausible Jack'. A popular and versatile actor, Palmer was believed to have performed over 375 different parts in his career. Palmer's remarkable career took him to many parts of the British Isles, including spells in Scotland and Ireland. After establishing himself as an actor, Palmer opened a new theatre, the Royalty, on Wellclose Square in East London. The theatre was open for less than two years however, and failed to offer the alternative to the West End which Palmer hoped to provide. His later career involved producing spectacles at the Royal Circus, but he was an actor to the last. Palmer had been beset by accidents throughout his career, including a near-fatal accident when a stage trap was released too quickly, and a stabbing when a spring in a dagger failed to work. He continued to work strenuously right up to his death, when taking on a lead role in Benjamin Thompson's 'The Stranger' at short notice. Clearly struggling, Palmer collapsed on stage and died during the fourth act. From a set of small mezzotint portraits of actors published by the printseller William Richardson in 1779. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii; O'D 7; for the Royal Circus see ref. 8120. Ex: Oettingen-Wallerstein Collection.
[Ref: 36673]   £220.00  
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Mr. Parsons.
Mr. Parsons.
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Published as the act Directs July 10th 1779 by W.m Richardson No.68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, sheet 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Trimmed to margins.
William Parsons (1736-95), actor. Beginning his career in York and Edinburgh, he was brought to London by the great David Garrick and eventually joined the company at the Haymarket Theatre. A popular and versatile actor, Parsons was also a keen painter of landscapes influenced by those of Richard Wilson. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii. O'D 8
[Ref: 36678]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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Mr. Parsons.
Mr. Parsons.
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Published as the act Directs July 10th 1779 by W.m Richardson No.68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, good impression with very large margins; sheet 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Uncut; glued to backing sheet along left edge.
William Parsons (1736-95), actor. Beginning his career in York and Edinburgh, he was brought to London by the great David Garrick and eventually joined the company at the Haymarket Theatre. A popular and versatile actor, Parsons was also a keen painter of landscapes influenced by those of Richard Wilson. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: Oettingen-Wallenstein collection and collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii. O'D 8
[Ref: 36679]   £230.00  
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The Morning Chronicle.
The Morning Chronicle. M.r. Perry.
Richard Dighton 1824.
Pub.d. by Tho.s. M.c.Lean Haymarket, Nov.r. 1824.
Hand-coloured etching with very large margins. Plate: 165 x 255mm, (6½ x 10"). Light dusting in top left, top right and bottom right corners.
Full length portrait in profile of James Perry (1751-1821), editor of The Morning Chronicle, who walks to the left with his hands in his pockets.
BM 14684
[Ref: 34485]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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I'm lucky I think __ To have plenty of Chink.
I'm lucky I think __ To have plenty of Chink.
[After Robert Dighton].
Printed for Bowles & Carver, No. 69 St. Pails Church Yard, London. [n.d., c.1791].
Hand coloured mezzotint. Platemark: 150 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Large margins. Repaired tear to lower left edge of sheet inside printed area. Damaged.
In oval, a sailor wearing a fur-hat wtih the ears turned up and a neckerchief, shown half-length to right, grinning towards the viewer while counting coins in his palm. Ships at sea can be seen through a window behind.
Ex CLB: i/iii. Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd.
[Ref: 32978]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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[Miss Young]
[Miss Young]
W. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, good impression with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Slight mount paper tone.
Elizabeth Pope (née Younge) (1739x45-1979), actress. She joined David Garrick's company at Drury Lane, where she made her debut in 1768 and spent most of her career (except for brief spells in Dublin, Bristol and the rival Covent Garden theatre as the result of pay disputes). She continued to act in provincial cities during the summers, however, and met her husband, the Irish artist and actor Alexander Pope (1763-1835) while acting in Ireland. While not among the greats of either tragedy or comedy, Pope was a versatile performer and Garrick seemed to have much affection for her. She died in 1797 shortly after withdrawing from a new theatrical role due to illness. From a set of small mezzotint portraits of actresses and singers, published by the printseller William Richardson in 1780, apparently to follow up a similar set of actor portraits published the previous year. Engraved by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 ii/iii.
[Ref: 36682]   £260.00  
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Miss Young
Miss Young
W. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, good impression with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Uncut; glued to backing sheet along left corners.
Elizabeth Pope (née Younge) (1739x45-1979), actress. She joined David Garrick's company at Drury Lane, where she made her debut in 1768 and spent most of her career (except for brief spells in Dublin, Bristol and the rival Covent Garden theatre as the result of pay disputes). She continued to act in provincial cities during the summers, however, and met her husband, the Irish artist and actor Alexander Pope (1763-1835) while acting in Ireland. While not among the greats of either tragedy or comedy, Pope was a versatile performer and Garrick seemed to have much affection for her. She died in 1797 shortly after withdrawing from a new theatrical role due to illness. From a set of small mezzotint portraits of actresses and singers, published by the printseller William Richardson in 1780, apparently to follow up a similar set of actor portraits published the previous year. Engraved by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: Oettingen-Wallenstein collection and collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii.
[Ref: 36683]   £260.00  
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Miss Pope.
Miss Pope.
W. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint with very large margins, platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½").
Jane Pope (1744-1818), actress. Pope's father William was barber and wigmaker for the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in Covent Garden, near to which his shop was located. Pope made her adult debut alongside Kitty Clive as part of Garrick's company at Drury Lane, and inherited many of Clive's roles after the elder actress retired. Pope was a reliable comic actress, a talented dancer (until a rapid weight gain led her to abandon dancing) celebrated for the clarity of her speaking voice. Pope retired in 1808, and had amassed sufficient wealth to bequeath significant money and property to her sister Susanna at her death. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836) as part of a series of mezzotints of actresses and singers. Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii. For Kitty Clive see ref. 23120
[Ref: 36680]   £260.00  
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Miss Pope
Miss Pope
W. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, good impression with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Uncut.
Jane Pope (1744-1818), actress. Pope's father William was barber and wigmaker for the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in Covent Garden, near to which his shop was located. Pope made her adult debut alongside Kitty Clive as part of Garrick's company at Drury Lane, and inherited many of Clive's roles after the elder actress retired. Pope was a reliable comic actress, a talented dancer (until a rapid weight gain led her to abandon dancing) celebrated for the clarity of her speaking voice. Pope retired in 1808, and had amassed sufficient wealth to bequeath significant money and property to her sister Susanna at her death. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836) as part of a series of mezzotints of actresses and singers. Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: Oettingen-Wallenstein collection and collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii. For Kitty Clive see ref. 23120
[Ref: 36681]   £260.00  
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A Rogue in Grain
A Rogue in Grain
[after Robert Dighton]
Printed for & Sold by Bowles & Carver / No. 69 St Pauls Church Yard, London.
Mezzotint, platemark 150 x 110mm (6 x 4½"). Glued to backing sheet.
A caricatured man in rustic dress. One of many 'droll' mezzotints made from the designs of Robert Dighton (1751-1814), who after the death of John Collet in 1780 became the foremost designer of such images.
Ex: collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; for another droll after Dighton see ref. 32347
[Ref: 32354]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
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A Rogue in Grain
A Rogue in Grain
[after Robert Dighton]
Printed for & Sold by Bowles & Carver / No. 69 St Pauls Church Yard, London.
Mezzotint with fine hand-colouring. 150 x 110mm (6 x 4½"), with large margins on three sides. Trimmed along lower edge.
A caricatured man in rustic dress. One of many 'droll' mezzotints made from the designs of Robert Dighton (1751-1814), who after the death of John Collet in 1780 became the foremost designer of such images.
Ex: collection of the Late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; for another droll after Dighton see ref. 32347
[Ref: 32355]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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The Font at Which Shakespeare was Baptized.
The Font at Which Shakespeare was Baptized.
Drawn by Mrs. P. Dighton. Printed by Lefevre & Kohler. 51, Newman St. Lithog.d by J. Salmon.
Stratford on Avon: Published June 1.st 1835 by Mrs. P. Dighton, & Ackermann & Co, 96 Strand London.
A very rare lithograph. 190 x 248mm (7½ x 9¾"). Cut.
The font is held at the Church of the Holy Trinity, Stratford-upon-Avon; also known as Shakespeare's church due to its fame as the place of baptism and burial of William Shakespeare.
[Ref: 30845]   £65.00   (£78.00 incl.VAT)
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A Noble Aiddecamp.
A Noble Aiddecamp.
Pub.d by Dighton J.nr. Charing Cross June 1804.
Hand coloured etching. Platemark: 300 x 230mm (11¾ x 9"). Cut to platemark top & bottom.
Lord Petersham, Charles Stanhope (1780-1851), 4th Earl of Harrington (1830-1851), sits on his horse in profile to the right, holding a large cocked hat in his right hand. Stanhope entered the Coldstream Guards in 1795 and became Captain of the 10th (Prince of Wales's Own) Regiment of the Light Dragoons in 1799. In 1803, was Major of the Queen's Rangers and in 1807 Lieutenant Colonel 3rd West India Regiment.
[Ref: 36589]   £85.00   (£102.00 incl.VAT)
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Mrs. Wrighten
Mrs. Wrighten
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, good impression with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Uncut.
Mary Ann Wrighten (later Pownall) (1751-96), singer and actress. Born in Hoxton, London in 1751, she married the actor James Wrighten in 1769 and was enaged by David Garrick for his Drury Lane Theatre in 1770. She was a leading singer at the theatre for the next sixteen years, and was also a favourite performer at Vauxhall Gardens. Wrighten had six children with only brief respites from the stage in between, and was seriously ill in both 1784 and 1786. In December 1786 her marriage broke down and she left her husband and children and abandoned the theatre, and went to live in Southwark with Hugh Pownall, a manufacturer of sulphuric acid. As a result her father cut her out of his will. The couple moved to America where they married, and the now Mrs Pownall sang to much acclaim in Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Charleston (some considered her the best vocalist heard in America up to that point). James Wrighten having died in the meantime, her daughters joined her in America where they performed alongisde her. Mary Ann died in Charleston. From a set of small mezzotint portraits of actresses and singers, published by the printseller William Richardson in 1780, apparently to follow up a similar set of actor portraits published the previous year. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area; sitter holding manuscript.
Ex: Oettingen-Wallenstein collection, and collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii.
[Ref: 36684]   £260.00  
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[Mrs. Wrighten]
[Mrs. Wrighten]
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint, good impression with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Slight mount paper tone.
Mary Ann Wrighten (later Pownall) (1751-96), singer and actress. Born in Hoxton, London in 1751, she married the actor James Wrighten in 1769 and was enaged by David Garrick for his Drury Lane Theatre in 1770. She was a leading singer at the theatre for the next sixteen years, and was also a favourite performer at Vauxhall Gardens. Wrighten had six children with only brief respites from the stage in between, and was seriously ill in both 1784 and 1786. In December 1786 her marriage broke down and she left her husband and children and abandoned the theatre, and went to live in Southwark with Hugh Pownall, a manufacturer of sulphuric acid. As a result her father cut her out of his will. The couple moved to America where they married, and the now Mrs Pownall sang to much acclaim in Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Charleston (some considered her the best vocalist heard in America up to that point). James Wrighten having died in the meantime, her daughters joined her in America where they performed alongisde her. Mary Ann died in Charleston. From a set of small mezzotint portraits of actresses and singers, published by the printseller William Richardson in 1780, apparently to follow up a similar set of actor portraits published the previous year. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area; sitter holding manuscript.
Ex: collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 ii/iii.
[Ref: 36685]   £260.00  
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Mrs. Yates
Mrs. Yates
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint with very large margins; platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Uncut; glued to backing sheet on left corner.
Mary Ann Yates (née Graham) (1728-1787), actress and theatre manager. She made her debut with Garrick's Drury Lane company in 1754 and in 1756 married another member of the company, the recently-widowed comedian Richard Yates (1706?-1796). She remained a regular member of Garrick's company until 1767, when she switched her allegiances to the rival Covent Garden Theatre, allegedly for financial reasons (although Yates denied this). She then broke with Covent Garden, less for financial reasons than the company's reluctance to retain Richard Yates, and in 1773 she took over management, with novelist and playwright Frances Brooke, of the King's Theatre, then London's home of opera. Around this time Richard Yates took over a playhouse in Birmingham, where Mary Ann sometimes performed. Having improved the fortunes of the King's Theatre, Yates returned to Drury Lane and sold her share in the King's Theatre. London's leading tragedienne of the period, Yates was admired by the public, with notable admirers including Horace Walpole and William Godwin. From a set of small mezzotint portraits of actresses and singers, published by the printseller William Richardson in 1780, apparently to follow up a similar set of actor portraits published the previous year. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: Oettingen-Wallenstein collection and collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 iii/iii; for Yates and Garrick, see ref. 20918.
[Ref: 36686]   £260.00  
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[Mrs. Yates]
[Mrs. Yates]
R. Dighton Pinx.t / R. Laurie Sculp.
Pub.d as the Act Directs March 1st 1780 by W. Richardson No. 68 High Holborn
Mezzotint with very large margins, platemark 155 x 115mm (6 x 4½"). Good impression; slight foxing.
Mary Ann Yates (née Graham) (1728-1787), actress and theatre manager. She made her debut with Garrick's Drury Lane company in 1754 and in 1756 married another member of the company, the recently-widowed comedian Richard Yates (1706?-1796). She remained a regular member of Garrick's company until 1767, when she switched her allegiances to the rival Covent Garden Theatre, allegedly for financial reasons (although Yates denied this). She then broke with Covent Garden, less for financial reasons than the company's reluctance to retain Richard Yates, and in 1773 she took over management, with novelist and playwright Frances Brooke, of the King's Theatre, then London's home of opera. Around this time Richard Yates took over a playhouse in Birmingham, where Mary Ann sometimes performed. Having improved the fortunes of the King's Theatre, Yates returned to Drury Lane and sold her share in the King's Theatre. London's leading tragedienne of the period, Yates was admired by the public, with notable admirers including Horace Walpole and William Godwin. From a set of small mezzotint portraits of actresses and singers, published by the printseller William Richardson in 1780, apparently to follow up a similar set of actor portraits published the previous year. Engraved after a painting by draughtsman and singer Robert Dighton (1751-1814) by the mezzotint engraver and printseller Robert Laurie (1755?-1836). Music, instruments and mask (representing theatre) in title area.
Ex: Oettingen-Wallenstein collection and collection of the late Hon. C. Lennox-Boyd; CS 1 ii/iii; for Yates and Garrick, see ref. 20918.
[Ref: 36687]   £260.00  
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