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Nan Wang Hoo.
Nan Wang Hoo.
Drawn from a Sketch by Lieut. I. Cooke, R.M. Engraved by T. Fielding.
[London: Longman & Co., 1818 or 1819.]
Hand-coloured aquatint, image 105 x 165mm. 4½ x 6½". Trimmed to plate. Trace of crease through upper left.
A watery landscape in East Asia; small boats on the lake or flooded plain to foreground, a mountain in the distance. From 'Narrative of a Journey in the Interior of China, and of a voyage to and from that country, in the years 1816 and 1817' by Clarke Abel (1780 - 1826). Abel was Naturalist to Lord Amherst's Embassy. The Alceste left Spithead on February 8, 1816 and first visited Madeira. From there she sailed to Table Bay, South Africa, then onwards to Java, from there to China, and then back to England via South Africa once more. On their return journey the ship was wrecked, but all passengers were rescued and they continued their voyage aboard the Termate.
Abbey Travel 537, 3. See BL: 981.f.17.
[Ref: 25037]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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Plan of the attacks and positions of the Allied Armies before Sebastapol in 1854-5.
Plan of the attacks and positions of the Allied Armies before Sebastapol in 1854-5. Plate III (To accompany the Report on the Siege of Sebastapol.)
Surveyed and Drawn by Capt.n Cooke, Lieut.s Brine, Fisher, Elphinstone, Cumberland, Anderson, James, C.G.Gordon, Scratchley & Donelly, of the Royal Engineers.. The Outline by F.Boyce, Writing by J.Hutchinson, Hills by G.de Garlieb.
Engraved at the Ordnance Survey Office Southampton in 1858, under the direction of L.t Col.l Cameron, R.E.
Engraved map. 660 x 940mm, 26 x 37". Wear and spotting to edges.
A detailed military map of the focus of the Allied effort in the Crimean War, with Sevastapol and Inkermann in the north and Balaklava in the south. It shows the outline of the town and its harbour, the position of the French military camps encircling the town to the south, the British headquarters further south of the city and the British camp, as well as a couple of Sardinian camps. It also marks the site of the Charge of the Light Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava on Oct. 25, 1854: the use of hachures for relief emphasises the bottleneck into which they rode.
[Ref: 10749]   £260.00  
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Demolition of the Great, or Chapel-Pier, of Old London Bridge.
Demolition of the Great, or Chapel-Pier, of Old London Bridge. With the Derrick used in Drawing the Foundation Piles &c March 1832.
Drawn & Etched By Edwd. Willm. Cooke.
London Pubd Octr. 1832, for the Proprietors by J. Brown 17, Old Broad Street.
Hand-coloured etching on india paper, sheet 285 x 335mm. 11¼ x 13¼". Margins trimmed.
Views on the Thames of the demolition of the old London Bridge, making way for John Rennie's new bridge. In 1800 it was decided to replace the old bridge, and a competition was held producing many varied designs. In 1824, Rennie's plans were accepted. The bridge was built 180 feet west of the old Bridge and for a time Londoners could see both the old bridge and the new side-by-side. On June 15, 1825, the Lord Mayor of London, John Garratt, laid the first stone, in the presence of the Duke of York. This London Bridge was built out of granite which was quarried on Dartmoor. It was a structure of 5 arches, overall dimensions were 928 feet long and 49 feet wide. When the new bridge was finished and opened by King William and Queen Adelaide in 1831, traffic switched to the huge new structure and the demolition commenced on the old bridge. Numbered 'Pl 6' upper right. From 'Views Of The Old And New London Bridges' (12 plates) by Edward William Cooke (1811 - 1880). Cooke was a draughtsman, illustrator, wood engraver, etcher and painter of rural and coastal scenes in oil and watercolour; son of engraver George Cooke. He was elected RA in 1864 and produced a number of drawings at Redleaf, the home of William Wells.
For the book see item Ref: 9819.
[Ref: 22327]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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Dilapidation of the Long-Entry Arch, Old London Bridge.
Dilapidation of the Long-Entry Arch, Old London Bridge. As it appeared March 20th 1832.
Drawn & Etched By Edwd. Willm. Cooke.
London Pubd April 1833 for the Proprietors by J. Brown Old Broad St. & J & A. Arch Cornhill.
Hand-coloured etching on india paper, sheet 310 x 390mm. 12¼ x 15¼". Margins a little trimmed.
Views on the Thames of the demolition of the old London Bridge, making way for John Rennie's new bridge. In 1800 it was decided to replace the old bridge, and a competition was held producing many varied designs. In 1824, Rennie's plans were accepted. The bridge was built 180 feet west of the old Bridge and for a time Londoners could see both the old bridge and the new side-by-side. On June 15, 1825, the Lord Mayor of London, John Garratt, laid the first stone, in the presence of the Duke of York. This London Bridge was built out of granite which was quarried on Dartmoor. It was a structure of 5 arches, overall dimensions were 928 feet long and 49 feet wide. When the new bridge was finished and opened by King William and Queen Adelaide in 1831, traffic switched to the huge new structure and the demolition commenced on the old bridge. From 'Views Of The Old And New London Bridges' (12 plates) by Edward William Cooke (1811 - 1880). Cooke was a draughtsman, illustrator, wood engraver, etcher and painter of rural and coastal scenes in oil and watercolour; son of engraver George Cooke. He was elected RA in 1864 and produced a number of drawings at Redleaf, the home of William Wells.
For the book see item Ref: 9819.
[Ref: 22328]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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The Southwark End of Old London-Bridge. From a Drawing taken at Low-water 25th Novr, 1831.
The Southwark End of Old London-Bridge. From a Drawing taken at Low-water 25th Novr, 1831.
Drawn & Etched by Edwd. Wm. Cooke.
London Pubd.Oct, 1832 for the Proprietors by J.Brown, Old Broad Street.
Etching 315 x 405mm.
River Thames at low tide. three figures in a boat on the River Thames and horse-drawn vehicles moving across the bridge overhead.
[Ref: 1360]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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Views Of The Old And New London Bridges.
Views Of The Old And New London Bridges. Drawn And Etched By Edward William Cooke. With Scientific And Historical Notices Of The Two Bridges; Practical Observations On The Tides Of The River Thames; And A Concise Essay On Bridges, From The Earliest Period; &c.&c. Derived From Information Contributed Exclusively For This Work, by George Rennie, Esq. F.R.S. F.A.S. &c.&c.
London: Published By Brown And Syrett, 17, Old Broad-Street; J. And A. Arch, Cornhill; Paul And Dominic Colnaghi And Co. Printsellers To The Royal Family, Pall Mall East; And George And E.W. Cooke, Barnes Terrace, Surrey. 1833.
Complete set of 12 etched plates, loose but offered with original brown cloth-covered binding (folio, 500 x 355mm, 19¾ x 14") and text. 'Old And New London Bridges' stamped in gilt on cover.
Views on the Thames of stages in the demolition of the old London Bridge, and the construction of John Rennie's new bridge. In 1800 it was decided to replace the old bridge, and a competition was held producing many varied designs. In 1824, Rennie's plans were accepted. The bridge was built 180 feet west of the old Bridge and for a time Londoners could see both the old bridge and the new side-by-side. On June 15, 1825, the Lord Mayor of London, John Garratt, laid the first stone, in the presence of the Duke of York. This London Bridge was built out of granite which was quarried on Dartmoor. It was a structure of 5 arches, overall dimensions were 928 feet long and 49 feet wide. When the new bridge was finished and opened by King William and Queen Adelaide in 1831, traffic switched to the huge new structure and the demolition commenced on the old bridge. Edward William Cooke (1811 - 1880) draughtsman, illustrator, wood engraver, etcher and painter of rural and coastal scenes in oil and watercolour; son of engraver George Cooke. He was elected RA in 1864 and produced a number of drawings at Redleaf, the home of William Wells. Dedicated by the artist in ink on the titlepage: 'From E.W. Cooke, to his kind friend [name erased] Venice, Sept. 1853.'
British Library: 000773987.
[Ref: 9819]   £1,500.00   view all images for this item
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Views of London and its Vicinity.
Views of London and its Vicinity. Complete in forty-eight plates, engraved on copper.
by George Cooke, from Drawings by Callcott, R.A., Stanfield A.R.A. Prout. Roberts. Stark. Harding. Cotman. Havell. &c. &c. After the Original Sketches made on the Spot by Edward W. Cooke.
London: Published by Longman & Co. Paternoster-Row; J. & A. Arch, Cornhill; Hodgson, Boys, and Graves, Pall Mall; and Mrs. G. Cooke, Barnes, Surrey.
375 x 280mm. 15 x 11". Some spotting. Binding worn.
Large paper copy containing all 48 plates, in original green binding. Rubbed.
[Ref: 9399]   £780.00   view all images for this item
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Effigies Tho: Mace Trin: Coll: Canta: Clericus.
Effigies Tho: Mace Trin: Coll: Canta: Clericus.
Hen. Cooke pinx. W. Faithorne Sculp.
[n.d., c.1676.]
Engraving, scarce. Sheet size: 265 x 190mm (10¼ x 7½"). Trimmed to image. False border. Glued to album sheet at corners.
A portrait of Deaf English musician Thomas Mace, (1612 or 1613 c. 1706) aged 63, half length in an oval, sitting in a chair, wearing bands and a cloak, and holding a sheet of music. A coat of arms is inscribed below image. This portrait was a frontispiece to Mace's 'Musick's Monument; or, A Remembrancer of the Best Practical Musick both Divine and Civil' (London, 1676) which provides a valuable description of 17th century musical practice. Mace was a lutenist, viola player, singer, composer and musical theorist. First state, before correction of 'Clericus' in title to 'Clerici'.
Fagan. p.47. I of II.
[Ref: 33838]   £190.00   (£228.00 incl.VAT)
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Plan of Sevastopol and of the Attacks and Positions of the Allied Armies in 1854-5.
Plan of Sevastopol and of the Attacks and Positions of the Allied Armies in 1854-5.
Surveyed & Drawn by Capt.n Cooke, Lieut.s Brine, Fisher, Elphinstone, Cumberland, Anderson, James, Scratchley, Donnelly & Baynes, of the Royal Engineers...
Lithographed at the Ordnance Map Office, Southampton, in 1857, under the direction of Capt.n Cameron, R.E.
7 lithographic maps (of eight) with hand colour. Each map 610 x 920mm, 24 x 36¼". A few small tears, some soiling to edges of two maps.
A monumental plan of the Siege of Sevastopol during the Crimean War, compiled by the Royal Engineers on a scale of six inches to a miles, published in the official report of the siege. The port itself fits into Sheet 3, with the defences of both sides coloured to demarque each army, green for the Russians, blue for the French and red for the British. The other sheets show the sprawling encampments of the Allies, with the British headquarters at Tractir Farm and the 'English Race Course' nearby, and the defensive arrays protecting the outer perimeters. Sheet six shows the Plain of Balaklava, site of the battle and famous 'Charge of the Light Brigade' on the 25th October 1854. The missing sheet is number eight, bottom right, showing the coast around the port of Balaklava.
[Ref: 10812]   £550.00   view all images for this item
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H.M.S. Victory, First Rate.
H.M.S. Victory, First Rate. 104 Guns. Portsmouth Harbour. The Flag Ship of the late Lord Nelson. On board which he was killed Off Trafalgar. Oct.r 21st, 1805.
Drawn by E.W. Cooke. Etched by E.W. Cooke. 1830
Pub'd by R. Lambe & Son, 96 Gracechurch Street.
Etching. 270 x 325mm (10½ x 12¾").
H.M.S. Victory at anchor off Portsmouth, serving as a harbour ship. Her career included the First and Second Battles of Ushant and St Vincent, with a three-year refit (1800-3) before the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. In 1922 she was moved into a dry dock at Portsmouth for preservation as a museum ship. Today she is the flagship of the First Sea Lord and is the world's oldest naval ship still in commission.
[Ref: 34043]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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