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Demolition of the Great, or Chapel-Pier, of Old London Bridge.
Demolition of the Great, or Chapel-Pier, of Old London Bridge. With the Derrick used in Drawing the Foundation Piles &c March 1832.
Drawn & Etched By Edwd. Willm. Cooke.
London Pubd Octr. 1832, for the Proprietors by J. Brown 17, Old Broad Street.
Hand-coloured etching on india paper, sheet 285 x 335mm. 11¼ x 13¼". Margins trimmed.
Views on the Thames of the demolition of the old London Bridge, making way for John Rennie's new bridge. In 1800 it was decided to replace the old bridge, and a competition was held producing many varied designs. In 1824, Rennie's plans were accepted. The bridge was built 180 feet west of the old Bridge and for a time Londoners could see both the old bridge and the new side-by-side. On June 15, 1825, the Lord Mayor of London, John Garratt, laid the first stone, in the presence of the Duke of York. This London Bridge was built out of granite which was quarried on Dartmoor. It was a structure of 5 arches, overall dimensions were 928 feet long and 49 feet wide. When the new bridge was finished and opened by King William and Queen Adelaide in 1831, traffic switched to the huge new structure and the demolition commenced on the old bridge. Numbered 'Pl 6' upper right. From 'Views Of The Old And New London Bridges' (12 plates) by Edward William Cooke (1811 - 1880). Cooke was a draughtsman, illustrator, wood engraver, etcher and painter of rural and coastal scenes in oil and watercolour; son of engraver George Cooke. He was elected RA in 1864 and produced a number of drawings at Redleaf, the home of William Wells.
For the book see item Ref: 9819.
[Ref: 22327]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
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Dilapidation of the Long-Entry Arch, Old London Bridge.
Dilapidation of the Long-Entry Arch, Old London Bridge. As it appeared March 20th 1832.
Drawn & Etched By Edwd. Willm. Cooke.
London Pubd April 1833 for the Proprietors by J. Brown Old Broad St. & J & A. Arch Cornhill.
Hand-coloured etching on india paper, sheet 310 x 390mm. 12¼ x 15¼". Margins a little trimmed.
Views on the Thames of the demolition of the old London Bridge, making way for John Rennie's new bridge. In 1800 it was decided to replace the old bridge, and a competition was held producing many varied designs. In 1824, Rennie's plans were accepted. The bridge was built 180 feet west of the old Bridge and for a time Londoners could see both the old bridge and the new side-by-side. On June 15, 1825, the Lord Mayor of London, John Garratt, laid the first stone, in the presence of the Duke of York. This London Bridge was built out of granite which was quarried on Dartmoor. It was a structure of 5 arches, overall dimensions were 928 feet long and 49 feet wide. When the new bridge was finished and opened by King William and Queen Adelaide in 1831, traffic switched to the huge new structure and the demolition commenced on the old bridge. From 'Views Of The Old And New London Bridges' (12 plates) by Edward William Cooke (1811 - 1880). Cooke was a draughtsman, illustrator, wood engraver, etcher and painter of rural and coastal scenes in oil and watercolour; son of engraver George Cooke. He was elected RA in 1864 and produced a number of drawings at Redleaf, the home of William Wells.
For the book see item Ref: 9819.
[Ref: 22328]   £130.00   (£156.00 incl.VAT)
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The Southwark End of Old London-Bridge. From a Drawing taken at Low-water 25th Novr, 1831.
The Southwark End of Old London-Bridge. From a Drawing taken at Low-water 25th Novr, 1831.
Drawn & Etched by Edwd. Wm. Cooke.
London Pubd.Oct, 1832 for the Proprietors by J.Brown, Old Broad Street.
Etching 315 x 405mm.
River Thames at low tide. three figures in a boat on the River Thames and horse-drawn vehicles moving across the bridge overhead.
[Ref: 1360]   £160.00   (£192.00 incl.VAT)
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Views Of The Old And New London Bridges.
Views Of The Old And New London Bridges. Drawn And Etched By Edward William Cooke. With Scientific And Historical Notices Of The Two Bridges; Practical Observations On The Tides Of The River Thames; And A Concise Essay On Bridges, From The Earliest Period; &c.&c. Derived From Information Contributed Exclusively For This Work, by George Rennie, Esq. F.R.S. F.A.S. &c.&c.
London: Published By Brown And Syrett, 17, Old Broad-Street; J. And A. Arch, Cornhill; Paul And Dominic Colnaghi And Co. Printsellers To The Royal Family, Pall Mall East; And George And E.W. Cooke, Barnes Terrace, Surrey. 1833.
Complete set of 12 etched plates, loose but offered with original brown cloth-covered binding (folio, 500 x 355mm, 19¾ x 14") and text. 'Old And New London Bridges' stamped in gilt on cover.
Views on the Thames of stages in the demolition of the old London Bridge, and the construction of John Rennie's new bridge. In 1800 it was decided to replace the old bridge, and a competition was held producing many varied designs. In 1824, Rennie's plans were accepted. The bridge was built 180 feet west of the old Bridge and for a time Londoners could see both the old bridge and the new side-by-side. On June 15, 1825, the Lord Mayor of London, John Garratt, laid the first stone, in the presence of the Duke of York. This London Bridge was built out of granite which was quarried on Dartmoor. It was a structure of 5 arches, overall dimensions were 928 feet long and 49 feet wide. When the new bridge was finished and opened by King William and Queen Adelaide in 1831, traffic switched to the huge new structure and the demolition commenced on the old bridge. Edward William Cooke (1811 - 1880) draughtsman, illustrator, wood engraver, etcher and painter of rural and coastal scenes in oil and watercolour; son of engraver George Cooke. He was elected RA in 1864 and produced a number of drawings at Redleaf, the home of William Wells. Dedicated by the artist in ink on the titlepage: 'From E.W. Cooke, to his kind friend [name erased] Venice, Sept. 1853.'
British Library: 000773987.
[Ref: 9819]   £1,500.00   view all images for this item
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Views of London and its Vicinity.
Views of London and its Vicinity. Complete in forty-eight plates, engraved on copper.
by George Cooke, from Drawings by Callcott, R.A., Stanfield A.R.A. Prout. Roberts. Stark. Harding. Cotman. Havell. &c. &c. After the Original Sketches made on the Spot by Edward W. Cooke.
London: Published by Longman & Co. Paternoster-Row; J. & A. Arch, Cornhill; Hodgson, Boys, and Graves, Pall Mall; and Mrs. G. Cooke, Barnes, Surrey.
375 x 280mm. 15 x 11". Some spotting. Binding worn.
Large paper copy containing all 48 plates, in original green binding. Rubbed.
[Ref: 9399]   £780.00   view all images for this item
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H.M.S. Victory, First Rate.
H.M.S. Victory, First Rate. 104 Guns. Portsmouth Harbour. The Flag Ship of the late Lord Nelson. On board which he was killed Off Trafalgar. Oct.r 21st, 1805.
Drawn by E.W. Cooke. Etched by E.W. Cooke. 1830
Pub'd by R. Lambe & Son, 96 Gracechurch Street.
Etching. 270 x 325mm (10½ x 12¾").
H.M.S. Victory at anchor off Portsmouth, serving as a harbour ship. Her career included the First and Second Battles of Ushant and St Vincent, with a three-year refit (1800-3) before the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. In 1922 she was moved into a dry dock at Portsmouth for preservation as a museum ship. Today she is the flagship of the First Sea Lord and is the world's oldest naval ship still in commission.
[Ref: 34043]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
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