VAT included (see terms) | Exclude VAT

Castle of Zohauk-I-Maran.
Castle of Zohauk-I-Maran. British Commandant of Shah Shoojau's 2nd Janbaz Cavalry and Afghan Troopers of the Corps.
Handcoloured lithograph. Sheet: 440 x 315mm (17¼ x 12¼"). Some staining. Large diagonal crease through left corner.
A view of Afghanistan showing Afghan soldiers who fought with the British for Shah Shuja-ull-Mulk (1785-1842) during the First Afghan war. From 'Sketches in Afghanistan' by James Atkinson (1780-1852), 'Superintending Surgeon of the Army of the Indus, Bengal Division' during the ill-fated British expedition into Afghanistan (1838-42). A Persian scholar and linguist, Atkinson has been described as 'a Renaissance man among Anglo-Indians'. Because of his languages he met many of the Afghan protagonists, including both Shah Shoojah-ool-Moolk and Dost Mohammad Khan. Fortunately he left the British garrison in 1840 to take another post, thus avoiding the disastrous retreat from Kabul in 1842. In his book 'The Expedition into Afghanistan', also published 1842, he compared the British presence in Afghanistan to Sisyphus rolling his stone up the hill.
Abbey Travel: 508.
[Ref: 41354]   £180.00   (£216.00 incl.VAT)
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

The Troops Emerging from the Narrow Part of the Defile.
The Troops Emerging from the Narrow Part of the Defile.
[J. Atkinson.]
[London: H. Graves & Co., 1842.]
Sepia tinted lithograph heightened in white, image 250 x 365mm. 9¾ x 14¼".
Anglo-Indian troops with camels on a narrow mountain pass observed by commanding officers in the foreground. The First Anglo-Afghan War was fought between British India and Afghanistan from 1839 to 1842. From 'Sketches in Afghaunistan' by James Atkinson of the East India Company’s Bengal Medical Service. Lithography by Louis and Charles Haghe.
Abbey Travel: 508, 11. British Library: 000135888.
[Ref: 20457]   £250.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

Bameen and Choolghoola.
Bameen and Choolghoola.
[Drawn by James Atkinson, lithographed by Louis & Charles Haghe.]
[London: H. Graves & Co., 1842.]
Tinted lithograph with large margins. Printed area 290 x 380mm (11½ x 15").
A view looking past a group of camping Afghans towards the acropolis of Bamyan. Bamyan has gained infamy as one of the places that the British captives, including Lady Sale and Vincent Eyre, were held after the retreat from Kabul and as the home of the two vast Buddhas dynamited by the Taliban in 2001. From 'Sketches in Afghaunistan' by James Atkinson (1780-1852), 'Superintending Surgeon of the Army of the Indus, Bengal Division' during the ill-fated British expedition into Afghanistan (1838-42). A Persian scholar and linguist, Atkinson has been described as 'a Renaissance man among Anglo-Indians'. Because of his languages he met many of the Afghan protagonists, including both Shah Shoojah-ool-Moolk and Dost Mohammad Khan. Fortunately he left the British garrison in 1840 to take another post, thus avoiding the disastrous retreat from Kabul in 1842. In his book 'The Expedition into Afghanistan', also published 1842, he compared the British presence in Afghanistan to Sisyphus rolling his stone up the hill.
Abbey Travel: 508.
[Ref: 35506]   £260.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

The Main Street in the Bazaar at Caubul in the Fruit Season.
The Main Street in the Bazaar at Caubul in the Fruit Season.
[J. Atkinson.]
[London: H. Graves & Co., 1842.]
Sepia tinted lithograph heightened in white, image 250 x 365mm. 9¾ x 14¼".
A busy market scene in Kabul, the capital and largest city of Afghanistan. The First Anglo-Afghan War was fought between British India and Afghanistan from 1839 to 1842. From 'Sketches in Afghaunistan' by James Atkinson of the East India Company’s Bengal Medical Service. Lithography by Louis and Charles Haghe.
Abbey Travel: 508, 20. British Library: 000135888.
[Ref: 20459]   £350.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

Fort of Mahomed Khan. - near Cabul.
Fort of Mahomed Khan. - near Cabul.
[Drawn by James Atkinson, lithographed by Louis & Charles Haghe.]
[London: H. Graves & Co., 1842.]
Tinted lithograph with large margins. Printed area 290 x 380mm (11½ x 15").
A view looking past a group of camping Afghans to the fortress of Dost Mohammad Khan (1793-1863). It was his negotiations for help from the Russians that led the British to invade Afghanistan in 1839. Forced into exile by the British, he returned in triumph in 1842. During the British invasion the Battle of Ghazni (July 23rd 1839) was a significant victory: the loss of the city caused the Afghan ruler, Dost Muhammad, to ask for terms of surrender, but finding them unacceptable, he fled Kabul. From 'Sketches in Afghanistan' by James Atkinson (1780-1852), 'Superintending Surgeon of the Army of the Indus, Bengal Division' during the ill-fated British expedition into Afghanistan (1838-42). A Persian scholar and linguist, Atkinson has been described as 'a Renaissance man among Anglo-Indians'. Because of his languages he met many of the Afghan protagonists, including both Shah Shoojah-ool-Moolk and Dost Mohammad Khan. Fortunately he left the British garrison in 1840 to take another post, thus avoiding the disastrous retreat from Kabul in 1842. In his book 'The Expedition into Afghanistan', also published 1842, he compared the British presence in Afghanistan to Sisyphus rolling his stone up the hill.
Abbey Travel: 508.
[Ref: 35508]   £260.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist