VAT included (see terms) | Exclude VAT

Robert Burns
Robert Burns In his Cottage composing 'The Cotters Saturday Night'...
Painted by William Allan, R.A. From the Original Picture in the possession of Robt. Nasmyth, Esq. Engraved by John Burnet, F.R.S.
London Published Nov. 1. 1836, by Hodgson & Graves, Printsellers to her Majesty, 6, Pall Mall [& in Edinburgh]. Printed by R. Lloyd.
Engraving on india paper, title in open letters. 560 x 410mm, 22 x 16". Laid on conservation tissue
Fictitious portrait of Robert Burns (1759 - 1796), poet. Burns shot to fame in 1786 with 'Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect' and the 'Scots Musical Museum' (1787) which contains some of his best-known songs. Burns was celebrated for using his personal experience of rustic subjects and local Scots dialects; Wordsworth wrote of 'Him who walked in glory and in joy/ Behind his plough, upon the mountainside.' After Sir William Allan (1782 - 1850), President of the Royal Scottish Academy.
See NPG D32438.
[Ref: 23424]   £120.00   (£144.00 incl.VAT)
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

Mary Queen of Scots compelled to sign her abdication in the Castle of Lochleven. [in banner] Simplex Munditiis.
Mary Queen of Scots compelled to sign her abdication in the Castle of Lochleven. [in banner] Simplex Munditiis. From the original Picture in the possession of Nathaniel George Philips Esqr. to whom this Plate is respectfully dedicated, by his obliged Servt. William Allan.
Painted by William Allan A.R.A. Engraved by James Stewart.
London_Published July 1st. 1827, for the proprietor by R. Ackermann, Strand. Printed by Mc. Queen.
Line engraving on india. Lettered proof. 476 x 565mm. 18¾" x 22¼". Some worm holes in margin, not in to platemark.
Mary I (popularly known as Mary, Queen of Scots and, in France, as Marie Stuart) (8 December 1542 8 February 1587) was Queen of Scots (the monarch of the Kingdom of Scotland) from 14 December 1542 to 24 July 1567. She was also the queen consort of France from 10 July 1559 to 5 December 1560. After a long period of custody in England, she was tried and executed for treason following her alleged involvement in three plots to assassinate Elizabeth I of England and place herself on the English throne. On 24 April 1567, Mary visited her son at Stirling for the last time. On her way back to Edinburgh Mary was abducted, willingly or not, by Bothwell and his men and taken to Dunbar Castle, where she was allegedly raped by Bothwell. She became pregnant with twins, which she later miscarried while imprisoned. On 6 May they returned to Edinburgh and on 15 May, at the Palace of Holyroodhouse, Mary and Bothwell were married according to Protestant rites. The Scottish nobility turned against Mary and Bothwell and raised an army against them. Mary and Bothwell confronted the Lords at Carberry Hill on 15 June, but there was no battle as Mary agreed to follow the Lords on condition that they let Bothwell go. However, the Lords broke their promise, and took Mary to Edinburgh and imprisoned her in Loch Leven Castle, situated on an island in the middle of Loch Leven. Between 18 July and 24 July 1567, Mary miscarried twins. On 24 July 1567, she was also forced to abdicate the Scottish throne in favour of her one-year-old son James.
[Ref: 8324]   £140.00   (£168.00 incl.VAT)
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

Sir Walter Scott, Bar.t. In his Study at Abbotsford.
Sir Walter Scott, Bar.t. In his Study at Abbotsford. Engraved from the Original Picture in the possesion of R. Naysmith Esq.r F.R.C.S and most respectfully dedicated to His Grace the Duke of Buccleuch by his Obliged Servant William Allen.
Painted by William Allen, R.A. Engraved by John Burnet.
London: Published March 25th, 1836 by Hodgson, Boys & Graves, Printsellers to the King, 6, Pall Mall, & Sold also by F.G. Moon, 20, Threadneedle Street.
Engraving. Laid, on India paper. Platemark: 555 x 410mm (21¾ x 16¼") very large margins. Light foxing in margins.
Sir Walter Scott seated in his study at his home at Abbotsford in Scotland, reading a proclamation made by Mary Queen of Scots. One of his many dogs, thought to be either Maida or Bran, sits by the fire. The artist made a record of the many remarkable objects in the room: 'the vase was the gift of Lord Byron; the keys hanging by the window are those of 'Heart of Mid Lothian' or Old Tolbooth of Edinburg(h). The Sword suspended from the Bookcase belonged to Montrose, and the Rifle surmounting the various articles hanging over the Mantlepiece to Speckbacher the Tyrolese Partriot; near the Bookcase are hung an ancient Border Bugle, James VI's travelling Flask, and the Sporan or Purse of Rob Roy Mcgregor. Behind the Bust of Shakespeare is Rob Roy's long gun, above which is Claverhous's Pistol and below a brace formerly the Property of Napoleon'.
See NPG 321 for the original oil (1831).
[Ref: 40045]   £280.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

[Sir Walter Scott, Bar.t in his Study at Abbotsford.]
[Sir Walter Scott, Bar.t in his Study at Abbotsford.]
Painted by William Allen, R.A. Engraved by John Burnet.
London: Published March 25th, 1836 by Hodgson, Boys & Graves, Printsellers to the King, 6, Pall Mall, & Sold also by F.G. Moon, 20, Threadneedle Street.
Engraving on india, proof before title. 555 x 395mm, 21¾ x 15½". Margins spotted.
Sir Walter Scott seated in his study at his home at Abbotsford in Scotland, reading a proclamation made by Mary Queen of Scots. One of his many dogs, thought to be either Maida or Bran, sits by the fire. The artist made a record of the many remarkable objects in the room: 'the vase was the gift of Lord Byron; the keys hanging by the window are those of 'Heart of Mid Lothian' or Old Tolbooth of Edinburg(h). The Sword suspended from the Bookcase belonged to Montrose, and the Rifle surmounting the various articles hanging over the Mantlepiece to Speckbacher the Tyrolese Partriot; near the Bookcase are hung an ancient Border Bugle, James VI's travelling Flask, and the Sporan or Purse of Rob Roy Mcgregor. Behind the Bust of Shakespeare is Rob Roy's long gun, above which is Claverhous's Pistol and below a brace formerly the Property of Napoleon'.
See NPG 321 for the original oil (1831).
[Ref: 13844]   £230.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

The Death of Archbishop Sharp.
The Death of Archbishop Sharp. To Sir Walter Scott of Abbotsford Bart. this Print from the original Picture in the possession of William Lockhart Esq.r of Germiston, Is respectfully dedicated by his obliged Servants, William Allan & James Stewart.
Painted by William Allan. Engraved by James Stewart.
London, Published April 3.d 1824 by Hurst, Robinson & Co. 90 Cheapside & 8, Pall Mall.
Copper engra with large margins. 480 x 640mm, 19 x 24¼".
The assassination of Archbishop Sharp by a band of Covenanters in 1679 on Magus Muir, outside St Andrews. Jailed during the Interregnum, Sharp was appointed Archbishop of St Andrews in 1661, just after the Restoration of Charles II. Despite being Presbyterian he sides with Charles against the Covenanters he had formerly represented, enforcing policies such as the Act of Supremacy (1669) which gave the King complete authority over the Church. After the Battle of Rullion Green in 1666 he is reported as having condemned to death eleven prisoners who had surrendered on a promise of mercy, telling them 'You were pardoned as soldiers, but you are not acquitted as subjects'. Such was his unpopularity in Scotland that when a group of Covenanters waiting to ambush the Sheriff of Cupar found Sharp instead they wasted no time in putting him to the sword, in front of his young daughter. This painting is hardly sympathetic to the Covenanters, who are depicted as ruffians, just as interested in looting the luggage as killing the defenceless Sharp. This conflicts with the Scottish perception of heroes dispatching a turncoat in league with the Devil.
[Ref: 24582]   £260.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist