VAT included (see terms) | Exclude VAT

Design of the Ceiling of Lady Bute’s Dressing Room. Dessein du Plafond de la Chambre de Toilette de la Comtesse de Bute.
Design of the Ceiling of Lady Bute’s Dressing Room. Dessein du Plafond de la Chambre de Toilette de la Comtesse de Bute. Plate VII.
R. Adam Architect 1769. B. Pastorini sculp.
Published as the Act directs, June 1774.
Engraving with small margins. Plate 444 x 596mm. 17½ x 23½".
Luton House: the ceiling of Lady Bute's dressing room decorated with stucco ornaments, by Mr. Rose, and paintings by Mr. Zucchi; Volume I, part 3, "Works in Architecture". Robert and his brother James Adam forever changed the face of British architecture by introducing innovative Classical design ideas. From 1754-57, Robert lived in Italy where he had a long productive friendship with Piranesi, which was inspirational for both men. Upon his return, the brothers launched their career by building the Adelphi from the Thames to the Strand in London, which although not a commercial success at the time, included one of London's most cherished buildings, the Adlephi Theatre. Together, the Adam brothers designed and built some of the most famous buildings in England, including such bastions of English architecture as Kenwood House, Keddlestone Manor, and Syon House. To the interiors of their English country houses, the Adams brought wonderful ornamental elements in niches, lunettes, festoons and reliefs. Their classically designed buildings were so numerous in London that they changed the prevailing feel of the city and established their brand of neo-Classicism as the model of elegance and importance. It is asserted that the brothers originated the concept of the uniform facade attached to the typical English row house, an architectural device that distinguishes London buildings. This monumental contribution is evidenced in the Adams' designs for Portland Place and Fitzroy Square, and these were used as architectural models for the whole city. The brothers brought their talents into other areas by designing furniture to complement their beautiful interiors and by creating and publishing a treatise of design entitled 'Works in Architecture'. The work was published in three volumes over an extended span of time, beginning in 1773, with the final volume being published posthumously in 1822.
[Ref: 27741]   £230.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

Design of a Chimney Piece executed in the Great Salon of the Queen’s House. Dessein d’une Cheminée executé dans le Grand Salon du Palais de la Reine. [&] A Chimney Piece designed for one of the Rooms in St. James's Palace. Dessein d'une Cheminée pour une
Design of a Chimney Piece executed in the Great Salon of the Queen’s House. Dessein d’une Cheminée executé dans le Grand Salon du Palais de la Reine. [&] A Chimney Piece designed for one of the Rooms in St. James's Palace. Dessein d'une Cheminée pour une des Chambres dans la Palais de St. Jacques. Plate IV.
R. Adam Architect 1762. D. Cunego Sculp.
Published as the Act directs 1773.
Engraving with small margins. Plate 605 x 460mm. 23¾ x 18¼".
Two chimney designs, one of which is execued in the great saloon of the Queen's House, and the other proposed for a room in the palace of St James's. In the freeze of the former, the crown and supporters are introduced as part of the ornament, and on the tablet of the latter is a bas-relief of the Aldo-brandini marriage; Volume I, part 5, "Works in Architecture". Robert and his brother James Adam forever changed the face of British architecture by introducing innovative Classical design ideas. From 1754-57, Robert lived in Italy where he had a long productive friendship with Piranesi, which was inspirational for both men. Upon his return, the brothers launched their career by building the Adelphi from the Thames to the Strand in London, which although not a commercial success at the time, included one of London's most cherished buildings, the Adlephi Theatre. Together, the Adam brothers designed and built some of the most famous buildings in England, including such bastions of English architecture as Kenwood House, Keddlestone Manor, and Syon House. To the interiors of their English country houses, the Adams brought wonderful ornamental elements in niches, lunettes, festoons and reliefs. Their classically designed buildings were so numerous in London that they changed the prevailing feel of the city and established their brand of neo-Classicism as the model of elegance and importance. It is asserted that the brothers originated the concept of the uniform facade attached to the typical English row house, an architectural device that distinguishes London buildings. This monumental contribution is evidenced in the Adams' designs for Portland Place and Fitzroy Square, and these were used as architectural models for the whole city. The brothers brought their talents into other areas by designing furniture to complement their beautiful interiors and by creating and publishing a treatise of design entitled 'Works in Architecture'. The work was published in three volumes over an extended span of time, beginning in 1773, with the final volume being published posthumously in 1822.
[Ref: 27737]   £230.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

Parts at Large of the Gateway at Sion. Parties en grand de la porte du chateau de Sion.
Parts at Large of the Gateway at Sion. Parties en grand de la porte du chateau de Sion. Plate II.
R. Adam Architect 1769.
[London: 1775.]
Engraving. Plate 610 x 452mm. 24 x 17¾". Some toning, paper chips to left edge.
Designs for the gateway at Syon House; profile and front of the keystone, entablature and capital of the open collonade, order and ornamented pilasters, patera, iron rail, and vases in the niches of the porters lodges. Robert and his brother James Adam forever changed the face of British architecture by introducing innovative Classical design ideas. From 1754-57, Robert lived in Italy where he had a long productive friendship with Piranesi, which was inspirational for both men. Upon his return, the brothers launched their career by building the Adelphi from the Thames to the Strand in London, which although not a commercial success at the time, included one of London's most cherished buildings, the Adlephi Theatre. Together, the Adam brothers designed and built some of the most famous buildings in England, including such bastions of English architecture as Kenwood House, Keddlestone Manor, and Syon House. To the interiors of their English country houses, the Adams brought wonderful ornamental elements in niches, lunettes, festoons and reliefs. Their classically designed buildings were so numerous in London that they changed the prevailing feel of the city and established their brand of neo-Classicism as the model of elegance and importance. It is asserted that the brothers originated the concept of the uniform facade attached to the typical English row house, an architectural device that distinguishes London buildings. This monumental contribution is evidenced in the Adams' designs for Portland Place and Fitzroy Square, and these were used as architectural models for the whole city. The brothers brought their talents into other areas by designing furniture to complement their beautiful interiors and by creating and publishing a treatise of design entitled 'Works in Architecture'. The work was published in three volumes over an extended span of time, beginning in 1773, with the final volume being published posthumously in 1822.
[Ref: 27574]   £280.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

Design of a painted Ceiling executed in the Room called the Japanned Room, in the Queen’s House. Plâfond peint, executé dans une Chambre nommée la Japonnaise, dans le Palais de la Reine.
Design of a painted Ceiling executed in the Room called the Japanned Room, in the Queen’s House. Plâfond peint, executé dans une Chambre nommée la Japonnaise, dans le Palais de la Reine. Plate VII.
R. Adam Architect 1762. B. Pastorini Sculp.
Published as the Act directs 1775.
Engraving with small margins. Plate 590 x 437mm. 23¼ x 17¼". Creasing.
Ceiling designs for the Japanese room in the Queen's Palace; Volume I, part 5, "Works in Architecture". Robert and his brother James Adam forever changed the face of British architecture by introducing innovative Classical design ideas. From 1754-57, Robert lived in Italy where he had a long productive friendship with Piranesi, which was inspirational for both men. Upon his return, the brothers launched their career by building the Adelphi from the Thames to the Strand in London, which although not a commercial success at the time, included one of London's most cherished buildings, the Adlephi Theatre. Together, the Adam brothers designed and built some of the most famous buildings in England, including such bastions of English architecture as Kenwood House, Keddlestone Manor, and Syon House. To the interiors of their English country houses, the Adams brought wonderful ornamental elements in niches, lunettes, festoons and reliefs. Their classically designed buildings were so numerous in London that they changed the prevailing feel of the city and established their brand of neo-Classicism as the model of elegance and importance. It is asserted that the brothers originated the concept of the uniform facade attached to the typical English row house, an architectural device that distinguishes London buildings. This monumental contribution is evidenced in the Adams' designs for Portland Place and Fitzroy Square, and these were used as architectural models for the whole city. The brothers brought their talents into other areas by designing furniture to complement their beautiful interiors and by creating and publishing a treatise of design entitled 'Works in Architecture'. The work was published in three volumes over an extended span of time, beginning in 1773, with the final volume being published posthumously in 1822.
[Ref: 27735]   £260.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

Design of the Ceiling of the Library or Great Room, at Kenwood. Dessein du plafond de la Biblioteque de la Villa de Kenwood.
Design of the Ceiling of the Library or Great Room, at Kenwood. Dessein du plafond de la Biblioteque de la Villa de Kenwood. Plate VII.
R. Adam Architect, 1767. B. Pastorini, Sculp.
Published as the Act directs 5.th February 1774.
Original coloured engraving with small margins. Plate 439 x 590mm. 17¼ x 23¾". Very fine 18th century coloured print. Slightly cut at top.
Kenwood: the stucco work, and other decorations, where executed by Joseph Rose with paintings by Antonio Zucchi.; Volume I, part 2, "Works in Architecture". Robert and his brother James Adam forever changed the face of British architecture by introducing innovative Classical design ideas. From 1754-57, Robert lived in Italy where he had a long productive friendship with Piranesi, which was inspirational for both men. Upon his return, the brothers launched their career by building the Adelphi from the Thames to the Strand in London, which although not a commercial success at the time, included one of London's most cherished buildings, the Adlephi Theatre. Together, the Adam brothers designed and built some of the most famous buildings in England, including such bastions of English architecture as Kenwood House, Keddlestone Manor, and Syon House. To the interiors of their English country houses, the Adams brought wonderful ornamental elements in niches, lunettes, festoons and reliefs. Their classically designed buildings were so numerous in London that they changed the prevailing feel of the city and established their brand of neo-Classicism as the model of elegance and importance. It is asserted that the brothers originated the concept of the uniform facade attached to the typical English row house, an architectural device that distinguishes London buildings. This monumental contribution is evidenced in the Adams' designs for Portland Place and Fitzroy Square, and these were used as architectural models for the whole city. The brothers brought their talents into other areas by designing furniture to complement their beautiful interiors and by creating and publishing a treatise of design entitled 'Works in Architecture'. The work was published in three volumes over an extended span of time, beginning in 1773, with the final volume being published posthumously in 1822.
[Ref: 27744]   £450.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

[Designs of different pieces of furniture done for this House.]
[Designs of different pieces of furniture done for this House.] Plate VIII.
R. Adam Architect. B. Pastorini Sculp.
Published as the Act directs 1774.
Engraving with small margins. Plate 444 x 590mm. 17½ x 23¾".
Luton House with designs for the stove-grate, cornices for window-curtain, and brass candelabra designs; Volume I, part 3, "Works in Architecture". Robert and his brother James Adam forever changed the face of British architecture by introducing innovative Classical design ideas. From 1754-57, Robert lived in Italy where he had a long productive friendship with Piranesi, which was inspirational for both men. Upon his return, the brothers launched their career by building the Adelphi from the Thames to the Strand in London, which although not a commercial success at the time, included one of London's most cherished buildings, the Adlephi Theatre. Together, the Adam brothers designed and built some of the most famous buildings in England, including such bastions of English architecture as Kenwood House, Keddlestone Manor, and Syon House. To the interiors of their English country houses, the Adams brought wonderful ornamental elements in niches, lunettes, festoons and reliefs. Their classically designed buildings were so numerous in London that they changed the prevailing feel of the city and established their brand of neo-Classicism as the model of elegance and importance. It is asserted that the brothers originated the concept of the uniform facade attached to the typical English row house, an architectural device that distinguishes London buildings. This monumental contribution is evidenced in the Adams' designs for Portland Place and Fitzroy Square, and these were used as architectural models for the whole city. The brothers brought their talents into other areas by designing furniture to complement their beautiful interiors and by creating and publishing a treatise of design entitled 'Works in Architecture'. The work was published in three volumes over an extended span of time, beginning in 1773, with the final volume being published posthumously in 1822.
[Ref: 27740]   £330.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

[Various Clocks & Pieces of Ornamental Furniture.]
[Various Clocks & Pieces of Ornamental Furniture.] Plate VIII.
R. Adam Architect. P. Begbie Sculp.
Published as the Act directs 1773.
Engraving with small margins. Plate 599 x 464mm. 23½ x18¼".
Various ornamental pieces designed and executed for different persons, including 3 clocks, a watch case, executed for Lady Aspley's dressing room; Volume I, part 4, "Works in Architecture". Robert and his brother James Adam forever changed the face of British architecture by introducing innovative Classical design ideas. From 1754-57, Robert lived in Italy where he had a long productive friendship with Piranesi, which was inspirational for both men. Upon his return, the brothers launched their career by building the Adelphi from the Thames to the Strand in London, which although not a commercial success at the time, included one of London's most cherished buildings, the Adlephi Theatre. Together, the Adam brothers designed and built some of the most famous buildings in England, including such bastions of English architecture as Kenwood House, Keddlestone Manor, and Syon House. To the interiors of their English country houses, the Adams brought wonderful ornamental elements in niches, lunettes, festoons and reliefs. Their classically designed buildings were so numerous in London that they changed the prevailing feel of the city and established their brand of neo-Classicism as the model of elegance and importance. It is asserted that the brothers originated the concept of the uniform facade attached to the typical English row house, an architectural device that distinguishes London buildings. This monumental contribution is evidenced in the Adams' designs for Portland Place and Fitzroy Square, and these were used as architectural models for the whole city. The brothers brought their talents into other areas by designing furniture to complement their beautiful interiors and by creating and publishing a treatise of design entitled 'Works in Architecture'. The work was published in three volumes over an extended span of time, beginning in 1773, with the final volume being published posthumously in 1822.
[Ref: 27739]   £330.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

Design of a Sedan Chair as executed for Her Majesty. Dessein d’une Chaise à Porteur executée pour la Reine.
Design of a Sedan Chair as executed for Her Majesty. Dessein d’une Chaise à Porteur executée pour la Reine. Plate VI.
R. Adam Architect 1771. P. Begbie sculp.
Published as the Act directs 1773.
Engraving with small margins. Plate 444 x 591mm. 17½ x 23¼".
Design for a sedan chair; Volume I, part 5, "Works in Architecture". Robert and his brother James Adam forever changed the face of British architecture by introducing innovative Classical design ideas. From 1754-57, Robert lived in Italy where he had a long productive friendship with Piranesi, which was inspirational for both men. Upon his return, the brothers launched their career by building the Adelphi from the Thames to the Strand in London, which although not a commercial success at the time, included one of London's most cherished buildings, the Adlephi Theatre. Together, the Adam brothers designed and built some of the most famous buildings in England, including such bastions of English architecture as Kenwood House, Keddlestone Manor, and Syon House. To the interiors of their English country houses, the Adams brought wonderful ornamental elements in niches, lunettes, festoons and reliefs. Their classically designed buildings were so numerous in London that they changed the prevailing feel of the city and established their brand of neo-Classicism as the model of elegance and importance. It is asserted that the brothers originated the concept of the uniform facade attached to the typical English row house, an architectural device that distinguishes London buildings. This monumental contribution is evidenced in the Adams' designs for Portland Place and Fitzroy Square, and these were used as architectural models for the whole city. The brothers brought their talents into other areas by designing furniture to complement their beautiful interiors and by creating and publishing a treatise of design entitled 'Works in Architecture'. The work was published in three volumes over an extended span of time, beginning in 1773, with the final volume being published posthumously in 1822.
[Ref: 27736]   £350.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist

Perspective View of the Bridge at Sion.
Perspective View of the Bridge at Sion.
R. Adam Architect 1768 / E. Rooker Sculp.t
[London: Printed for the Authors; And sold by Peter Elmsly [....] MDCCLXXVII]
Engraving with very large margins, platemark 455 x 600mm (18 x 23½"). Repaired tears.
Robert Adam's unrealized plan for a bridge at Syon House. Plate from the Adam brothers' "Works in Architecture". At the time the work was published, Adam was presumably confident that the plan would go ahead, as his accompanying text ('the whole is new and is reckoned fanciful and picturesque') suggests that the bridge in fact already existed. Robert and his brother James Adam forever changed the face of British architecture by introducing innovative Classical design ideas. Together, they designed and built some of the most famous buildings in England, including Kenwood House, Keddlestone Manor, and Syon House. The brothers diversified by designing furniture to complement their beautiful interiors and by creating and publishing their 'Works' as a treatise on design, in three volumes beginning in 1773 and concluding with a posthumous volume of 1822.
[Ref: 31969]   £360.00  
enquire about this item add to your wishlist